Jewish Educational Alliance: The Countryside

Posted on December 28, 2016 by

Article by Jennifer Vess. Originally published in Generations 2009-2010: 50th Anniversary Double Issue: The Search for Social Justice.

Side Bar 3: The Countryside

Missed parts 1 – 7? Start from the Beginning.

”Paradise Home” in Catonsville. It was purchased by the Hebrew Benevolent Society to provide mothers and babies with country vacations. This was the earliest forerunner of Camp Woodlands, and later, New Camp Milldale. In the background is Dr. Harry Lindeu, medical student, who served as camp doctor. JMM 1995.98.30

”Paradise Home” in Catonsville. It was purchased by the Hebrew Benevolent Society to provide mothers and babies with country vacations. Dr. Harry Lindeu, medical student, who served as camp doctor, stands in the background. JMM 1995.98.30

Reformers blamed industrialization for many of society’s woes, including the dirt and pollution of the city. While the wealthy could flee the heat and disease of the urban summer for homes in the country, the poor did not have the choice to leave their homes and their work in the “dirty city” for more open, green spaces in the rural areas surrounding Baltimore.

Maccabean House: vacation house

Maccabean House: vacation house

Charitable organizations and settlement houses strove to give at least some respite to the women and children of Baltimore. Both the Daughters in Israel and the Maccabeans set up summer homes for their clientele. At as low a cost as possible, young women and boys could spend a few days on farms or in the mountains beyond the city limits. The JEA continued this effort. In 1910 a summer home was set up in Catonsville (then a rural area) for women and children. The JEA also worked with the Children’s Fresh Air Society, a national charity that sponsored trips for children to area farms.[1] Later, Sigmund Sonneborn offered his property on the Severn River as a camp for boys. Eventually a separate organization established a camp in the area of Catonsville known as “Paradise,” which became Camp Woodlands. Camp Woodlands served the Jewish children of Baltimore until 1952 when it merged with the JEA, the Young Men’s Hebrew Association and the Young Women’s Hebrew Association into the new Jewish Community Center.

~The End~

Notes:

[1] JEA meeting minutes, May 3, 1910 and June 2, 1910, MS 170, Folder 212, JMM.

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3 Comments

  1. ROBERT TUCKER says:

    seeking INFO ON A JEWISH SPONSORED CAMP FOR CHILDREN BEING RESETTLED FROM THE HOLOCAUST ..CIR, 1945…CATONSVILLE, MD

  2. ROBERT TUCKER says:

    ANY INFO ON CAMP WOODLAND BEING USED AS A REFUGEE CAMP 1945

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