Hanukkah Clean-Up 2017/2018: The Oven Method

Posted on December 28, 2017 by

A blog post by Associate Director Tracie Guy-Decker. Read more posts from Tracie by clicking HERE.

I know people overuse the phrase “it changed my life,” especially at this resolution-time of the year, but I can honestly say that when I learned the oven-method of hanukkiah wax removal, it greatly increased my enjoyment of the festival of lights! Before I learned this method, I used to spend hours with a fork or a toothpick or sometimes a chopstick chipping away at wax our menorahs. I would scrape and poke and curse and then start the cycle over again. It was as far from Hanukkah joy as you could get. Now that I use the oven method, even the clean-up of the holiday feels like a blessing.

To share the added joy, I wanted to walk you through it.

First, a glimpse of my house on the final night of Hanukkah:

We light 9 menorahs at the Guy-Decker household each year. Why? Because we can.  On the final night, the heat off of the 81 candles is palpable, and the light is truly joyous.

The wax is a bi-product of the joy. The greater the joy, the higher the wax build-up.

For this demonstration, I’m going to show you the oven-method on this brass menorah that belonged to my husband’s grandfather. Its “before” picture is particularly intimidating with that thick barrier of blue and white wax build up.

To remove this build-up I followed these steps:

1. Pre-heat the oven to between 180 and 200 degrees.

2. Break off any wax that will come off easily and discard. Do not work at this: if it doesn’t come off easily, leave it.

3. Cover a cookie sheet in aluminum foil. Make sure the foil overlaps the edges of the sheet so you don’t end up with waxy cookie sheets.

Place the menorah face down (or as face-down as you can manage—the key is that the candle cups are oriented downward so that liquefied wax will poor out).

4. Place the cookie sheet into the oven for approximately 20 minutes

5. Remove the cookie sheet from the oven and carefully (it’s hot!) remove the menorah from the cookie sheet (you might want to have prepared another piece of foil if you’re worried about removing wax from the counters, too). You should be leaving a puddle of wax on the foil on the cookie sheet.

If you’re not, and the wax is still mostly on the menorah, put it all back into the oven for another 5 minutes, or until you have puddling.

6. Carefully (it’s still hot!) wipe the liquid wax from the menorah with a clean rag. (Use a thicker rag so the heat doesn’t bother your hands.)

a. Fold the rag after each wipe so that you’re not just moving wax around.

b. If your menorah has small nooks and crannies, you can use a q-tip or other small tool to wipe out the liquid wax (I used my rag around a kabob skewer to get into the openings in the star points).

c. If you have a very ornate menorah, you might need to put it back into the oven for a few minutes if your detail work in one area allows the wax to cool too much in another area.

7. Discard the foil and the rag.

8. Voila! You’re ready for next Hanukkah.

So, what do you think? Life changing? Ok, so maybe it’s not on par with falling in love or finding your dream home, but I hope that it does make your dream menorah more of a possibility for you. Come down and see us at Esther’s Place. I bet you’ll be looking at our fancy and fanciful hannukiot in a new light now that you know the oven method!

P.S. Even with the oven method, I recommend sticking with white and/or beeswax candles for the really ornate menorahs out there. I would also note that in my experience, cheaper candles make more wax.

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2 Comments

  1. Anne King says:

    You can also spray your menorah with a product called Wax Off or Pam cooking spray before you put the candles in.

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