MS 46 Sidney D. Cohen Collection

Posted on January 17th, 2013 by

Thanks to JMM archives volunteers we are getting every closer to our goal of having complete finding aids for every one of our 212 manuscript

Sidney D. Cohen, 1896-1987

Collection, n.d., 1911-1987

 MS 46

Jewish Museum of Maryland

Har Sinai Congregation confirmation class, taken by Bachrach & Bro., 1911. Part of the Sidney Cohen Collection. Sourtesy of Audrey Fox. 1994.189.1

 

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Sidney D. Cohen Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland in 1994 as accessions 1994.189 by Audrey Fox. The collection was processed at an unknown date and a finding aid was written by Sidney Rankin in 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Sidney Cohen with the Real Estate Board, Baltimore, c. 1952. Courtesy of Audrey Fox. 1994.189.2

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Sidney D. Cohen was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1896, and was educated in the city public schools and Baltimore City College.  He entered the real estate business in 1924 and subsequently was elected President of B. Howard Richards, Inc in 1933, retiring in 1967.  He was President of the Real Estate Board of Baltimore from 1953-1954.  In addition he served on a number of city committees and commissions and was Chairman of the Downtown and Traffic Committee of the Real Estate Board of Greater Baltimore.  He was appointed by President Eisenhower as a member of the National Committee on Safety as a representative of the real estate industry of the State of Maryland.  Cohen was a member of both the Chizuk Amuno and Oheb Shalom Congregations.  He served on the real estate committee of the Associated Jewish Charities, was a Vice President of the Suburban Club, and also was active in the St. John Lodge of the Masons.

Charles Center Theater Building site, sign describing project, before anything was built, 1960-1965. Courtesy of Audrey Fox. 1994.189.3

SCOPE AND CONTENT
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The collection contains programs, certificates, correspondence, booklets and other documents related to his work with real estate, his participation in Jewish organizations including synagogues and the Suburban Club. The collection is organized alphabetically by folder title.

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Spotlight on Collections

Posted on January 10th, 2013 by

The majority of our archival collection here at the Jewish Museum of Maryland dates after the construction of the Lloyd Street Synagogue (1845).  This isn’t surprising giving the size of the Jewish population in Baltimore before that time.  But we do have some items from the earlier part of the 19th century or even the end of the 18th century.

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and Miriam (daughter of Ezekiel) in Baltimore, 1839. Courtesy of Mabel F. Kraus. 1964.24.2″]

Handwritten ketubah (marriage contract) for Simon [Floss?

Prayer book, in Old German and Hebrew, edited by W. Heidenheim and published in Rodelheim by J. Lehrberger, 1838. This book was used by Rabbi Abraham J. Rice (first rabbi at the Lloyd Street Synagogue) with family information inscribed. Courtesy of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Flehinger. 1963.6.1

Indenture between Daniel Evans and Richard Bell for a piece of ground in Fells Point at Fleet and Ann Streets for $1000.00, 1818. Courtesy of Albert Berney. 1992.232.2

Power of attorney concerning Michael Gratz, his wife Miriam Gratz and Michael’s brother Bernard, 1795. Courtesy of Dr. Joseph Francus. 1983.31.2

A travel diary/itinerary for a trip taken July 9-August 17, 1786. 1988.145.10

Hebrew or Yiddish note with English translations regarding the death of Joshua Cohen in Germany, 6 Tammuz 5539 (1779). Courtesy of Maxwell Whiteman. 1989.1.19

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MS 207 Hebrew Young Men’s Sick Relief Association

Posted on January 3rd, 2013 by

Here is one of our most recent Mansuscript Collections processed in the Spring of 2012.

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Hebrew Young Men’s Sick Relief Association Papers

1888-1978

 MS 207

 The Jewish Museum of Maryland

 

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Hebrew Young Men’s Sick Relief Association Papers were found in the collection of the Jewish Museum of Maryland and given the accession number 2006.48.001 and 1996.164.028.  The collection was processed in May of 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

50th Anniversary committee Hebrew Young Men's Sick Relief Association, 1938. Courtesy of Paul Frankle. 2009.53.1

HISTORICAL NOTE

The Hebrew Young Men’s Sick Relief Association was founded in September 1888 by three recent immigrants; Aaron Grollman, Feivel Kirshner and Samuel Levi.  Its main purpose was to assist immigrant Jews from Russia and Lithuania settling in Baltimore.  They adopted the slogan:  “Love, Brotherhood and Friendship”.  Services included:  assisting members in time of sickness, aiding widows and orphans, and in times of disaster offering aid to all regardless of faith.

The Association established a Chevra Kadisha to properly attend to deceased members.  In 1893 they purchased land and dedicated it for a cemetery. In 1936 a new cemetery was bought on Windsor Mill Road.  The organization next established an endowment fund where, upon the death of a member, $200.00 was paid to the widows and orphans to assist them and prevent them from becoming public charges.

In public disasters the Association did its share and offered aid to the suffering regardless of faith;  in February 1904 when Baltimore had its Big Fire, during World Wars I and II, and after the Balfour Declaration contributed toward the establishment and development of Israel.

The Hebrew Young Men’s Sick and Relief Association celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 1938 when it had nearly a thousand members.  The Association was still in existence as late as 1978.

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The Hebrew Young Men’s Sick Relief Association collection consists of administrative documents records and programs.  Records include constitution and by-laws in English and Yiddish, financial reports, agreements with cemeteries and minutes of meetings.

Minutes include financial statements and rosters with the earliest in Yiddish.  There is information regarding programs and events from 1938 to 1978.

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