Once Upon a Time…12.26.2015

Posted on August 25th, 2015 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church at 410.732.6400 x236 or email jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

1997134529Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  December 26, 2014

 

PastPerfect Accession #:  1997.134.529

 

Status:  Potential Identification – The gentleman in the wheelchair might be Daniel Becker (resident of Concord House, next door to Levindale).

 

Special Thanks To: Jack Becker

 

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Recognizing and Responding to Injustice: Using the Lessons of the Holocaust as a Tool for Combating Contemporary Intolerance in Our Communities Today

Posted on August 24th, 2015 by

During my summer internship at the JMM, I had the opportunity to work on a pop-up exhibit in connection with the JMM’s Annual Summer Teachers Institute that focuses on best practices in Holocaust Education. After I learned how to use the museum software Past Perfect and learned about the JMM’s extensive collections, I was inspired to develop an exhibit.  The exhibit focuses on recognizing and responding to injustices in our community. It relates to the 2015 Summer Teachers Institute’s theme: Auschwitz 70 Years Later, What have we Learned? I wanted to put some of the JMM’s collections on display and give teachers an opportunity to see what objects and materials we have in the collections that relate to topics they are teaching about the Holocaust in their classrooms.

Falicia stands in front of the lobby display she created.

Telling the teachers about my exhibit.

In recent years there have been many instances of injustices in our communities: locally, nationally, and worldwide. My hope is that by examining injustices during the Holocaust we can be inspired to recognize and respond to injustices in our communities today. I encouraged the teachers to reflect on this question: How can we teach our students to recognize and become “upstanders” or activists against injustices in our communities and society?

The exhibit consisted of photographs, objects, and documents about the Holocaust. Preparing for the exhibit was a lot more complex than I originally thought it would be. Some of the objects in the exhibit include: pieces of a chandelier from a desecrated synagogue during Kristallnacht, and an uncut Star of David.  The exhibit also included archival materials…

Mass Meeting Flyer

This is a Mass Meeting flyer announcing a meeting for Jewish people in Baltimore to learn about what was happening to the European Jews.

Baltimore Jewish Council booklet

The Baltimore Jewish Council booklet was established in 1939 to create a united front against Anti-semitism during World War II and provide resources on Jewish issues.

These are pictures of the Nazi and Confederate flags to show how flags represent different things to people, and can have painful associations and connections to injustices.

These are pictures of the Nazi and Confederate flags to show how flags represent different things to people, and can have painful associations and connections to injustices.

I had a lot of support from several staff members and interns including: Ilene, Joanna, Deborah, Karen, and collections intern Kaleigh who helped me pick appropriate objects, reviewed my labels, and helped me with the installation process. I really felt like I had the support of the staff in developing my first exhibit.

Falicia and Collections Manager Joanna in the library cutting out exhibit text.

Joanna and I are cutting out texts for the exhibit.

Falicia arranging the objects in the display case.

And here I am arranging the objects in the display case.

When I installed the exhibit I was not sure how many people would be able to see it and what they would think. On Monday August 3rd over 30 teachers came to the museum for the Summer Teachers Institute. Ilene told them about my exhibit and in between workshops educators came and looked at my exhibit.

Page of handwritten comments about the display.

Teachers wrote comments about the exhibit.

I enjoyed telling the teachers about my exhibit. It was also great to hear some of the conversations they had about the exhibit and the connections they were making about injustices of the Holocaust and forms of injustice they see today. It was great to hear comments and dialogue between the teachers about what was in the exhibit and many of them were interested in seeing what else we had in our collections.

Falicia EddyA blog post by Education and Programs Intern Falicia Eddy. To read  more posts from interns click HERE.

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JMM Insights: Here Comes Rhymin’ Simon

Posted on August 21st, 2015 by

Raised in Queens. Enshrined in Cleveland. Loved in Baltimore.

It’s official.  This October the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s exhibit, Paul Simon: Words and Music, which celebrates the life of one of America’s greatest singer/songwriters, will make Baltimore its first stop on a nationwide tour.  READ THIS ARTICLE TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN RESERVE A SPOT AT OUR EXCLUSIVE MEMBERS’ PREVIEW AND CONCERT ON SATURDAY NIGHT, OCTOBER 10.

Paul Simon

Paul Simon

Paul Simon: Words and Music features autobiographical films, videos of select performances and more than 80 artifacts, chronicling the life, career and creative inspiration of two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Paul Simon. Included is original narration by the artist, recorded specifically for the exhibit and unavailable elsewhere, as well as costumes, film clips, letters and memorabilia associated with his career.

“We wanted to give Paul Simon the opportunity to tell his own story. We interviewed him for hours and asked him how he got started, his creative process, and how he came up with some of his songs,” said Karen L. Herman, Vice President of Curatorial Affairs for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “His stories provide context to the places where his music intersected with our culture, from Simon & Garfunkel to Saturday Night Live. We used that to really define how the exhibit would work, with much of the footage used to guide visitors through his life and career.”

Simon's guitar

Simon’s guitar

Among the exhibits artifacts are guitars like Simon’s 1967 Guild F-30-NT-Spec, used to write and record most of Simon & Garfunkel’s canon, and Simon’s first guitar, personal summer camp correspondence between Paul and Art, jackets, rare photos, and handwritten lyrics to songs like The Boxer (starting with notes made on an in-flight magazine) and the album Graceland (scratched out on a yellow pad). It covers all the genres of Simon’s work – folk, rock and world music.

And the main exhibit is just the beginning:

> We are also preparing a small pop-up exhibit “An American Tune:  Jews and Folk and Folk-Rock”.  Did you know that Arlo Guthrie was trained for his bar mitzvah by Rabbi Meir Kahane?  Find this and other surprises in our special lobby exhibit.

> Both exhibits will be used as platforms for an outstanding series of JMM programs including:

Scott Bernarde speaking on Jewish rock stars on Oct. 11; Cantor Solomon and Cantor Klepper in a performance/lecture on folk music and Jewish liturgy on Oct. 18; Nora Guthrie talks about Woody’s Hanukah songs on Nov.22;  a film festival on Tuesday nights in November, featuring Under African Skies, A Mighty Wind, Inside Llewyn Davis and Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune;  Joanie Leeds returning for a special Hanukah performance and a dozen other lectures and performances.

You will find a full list of events and program details in our Sept. 4 edition of Museum Matters.

> In November, we’ll be adding a “Sounds of the Synagogue” Tour to our menu of special Lloyd Street Synagogue adventures.  The tours will be on Sundays at 3pm.

> The education team has also prepared a curriculum for school groups at grade levels from elementary school to high school to go with the Paul Simon exhibit that combines humanities and the arts.  At upper levels students will be asked to compare the America of the 1960s that Simon wrote about, with Baltimore today.  They will be asked to prepare their own topical lyrics about the challenges of our times.  If you know of a teacher that wants to take advantage of this opportunity, please connect them with our Visitor Services manager, Graham Humphrey (ghumphrey@jewishmuseummd.org) and he’ll make all the arrangements.

AND NOW THE MAIN EVENT

Most of the people who receive this newsletter are JMM members.  One of the benefits of JMM membership are invitations to exclusive member previews for all our exhibits.  And the preview for Paul Simon on October 10 is so special that we’re asking members to make advance reservations.

The Guthrie Bros.

The Guthrie Bros.

In addition to being among the first to see this great new exhibit, we have arranged a Simon & Garfunkel Tribute Concert by the Guthrie Bros. (no relation to Woody, but great musicians – see more here: The Guthrie Bros.  To maximize the number of people who can see this concert, we’ve moved it into the Lloyd Street Synagogue.  Overflow and accessible seating will be in the JMM building with live remote video.  Doors will open at 7:30, and the concert begins at 7:45pm

Because we anticipate high demand for this member’s only event, we’ve set up a special reservations mailbox:

reservations@jewishmuseummd.org

Total capacity in the Lloyd Street Synagogue is 220 seats, so you will want to reserve early.  Tickets will be distributed on a first come, first served basis so we request that you only make reservations via the special reservation mailbox.  Individual members will be able to reserve one ticket, “senior couple” members will be able to reserve two, and family members can reserve up to five tickets. For more information please contact Trillion Attwood at tattwood@jewishmuseummd.org or 410.732.640 ext.215.

 

 

 

 

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