Once Upon a Time…05.15.2015

Posted on February 2nd, 2016 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church at 410.732.6400 x236 or email jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

 

2010020130Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  May 15, 2015

 

PastPerfect Accession #:  2010.020.130

 

Status:  Partially Identified – do you know any of the unidentified nurses? Sinai Nursing School alumnae banquet, 1969. Left to right: 1) Sonia Goodman 2) no ID 3) Beverly Fine Serpick 4) no ID 5) no ID 6) Toby Mower 7) no ID 8) possibly Melba Flores 9) Sue (?) 10) no ID.  Interestingly, two people in this photo were positivey ID’d by themselves, though other respondents gave different IDs.

 

Special Thanks To: Elizabeth Karpa, Sonia Goodman, Toby Mower

 

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Winter Weather vs. Wedding, 1928

Posted on January 29th, 2016 by

This cute, spring-like little chiffon dress seems like an unlikely avenue for talking about a snowstorm, but a search of our collections for the word “blizzard” offered it up nonetheless.

Flower girl dress, donated by Bernice Weinstein. JMM 2003.63.1

Flower girl dress, donated by Bernice Weinstein. JMM 2003.63.1

The dress was made by Etta Cohen Adelberg for her young daughter, Eva, to wear in Etta’s brother Ben Cohen ’s wedding to Zelda Greenberg.  The ceremony was held at Shaarei Zion on Park Heights Avenue on January 29, 1928 … in the aftermath of a city-crippling blizzard that had hit the day before.

Though it does not appear in “Worst Storms” lists today, the January 28, 1928 blizzard was a major one for Baltimore.  The summary article in the Sun, published on the 29th, was dramatically headlined:

SNOW BLOCKS ALL ROADS BUT 2 OUT OF CITY

Only Annapolis and Frederick Arteries Open After Blizzard.

STORM HEAVIEST HERE IN SIX YEARS

15-Inch Fall Recorded, Autos Stranded, Cars Delayed, Ships Halted.

It was the first big storm of the season for the east coast, with the Washington-Baltimore area being the worst hit; the infamous Knickerbocker Storm of 1922, in which 98 Washingtonians died when the roof of the Knickerbocker Theater collapsed, was fresh in the minds of Maryland residents.  Thankfully, though the 1928 storm was “rather unexpected,” the Sun reported only one death in the area, an elderly woman in Frederick.

“A hundred snow plows sent out by the State Roads Commission were unable to cope with the drifts which in some paces rose to a height of ten feet,” the Sun reported on the 29th, and automobile traffic was essentially halted – but streetcars and buses were able to operate by the next day, and the city directed some post-storm efforts toward  “[blocking off] some roads through Baltimore’s parks … to allow children to sled in safety.”

And in the meantime, some events went on as planned – like a wedding in Park Heights.

Though Ben and Zelda Cohen were well-known in Baltimore society in the 20th century, in part because of their involvement with Pimlico Raceway (Ben was a co-owner of the track, and they both owned and raced thoroughbreds), I’ve not found any info about the wedding itself, other than the story about the blizzard that came with little Eva’s flower girl dress. I’m dying to know more – were most guests able to get in, thanks to cleared sidewalks and the still-running Park Heights streetcar?  How did Zelda and Ben feel on the 28th, watching the progress of nature’s wedding present?  And was Eva warm enough??

JoannaA blog post by Collections Manager Joanna Church. To read more posts by Joanna click HERE.

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Snowmageddon, Again???

Posted on January 27th, 2016 by

Snow – it’s all everyone is talking about this week. You can’t turn on the radio without nonstop coverage of school closings (never mind that a flake has yet to fall) and updated forecasts.

So instead of joining the fray and creating yet more pandemonium, I thought it might be fun to take a more lighthearted look at how Marylanders have historically coped with snow by taking a look through our photograph collection.

One of our earliest collection of snow filled photos is actually not a local scene but was taken by members of the Friedenwald Family (yes, the same family who is a subject of our upcoming Beyond Chicken Soup exhibit) while they were visiting Switzerland for the VII Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzerland.

1984.023.016 – Snow covered mountain in Switzerland

1984.023.016 – Snow covered mountain in Switzerland

1984.023.049 – I especially love this photo of men with their simple gear. Amazing to think they were able to mountain climb without stocking up on an array of fancy gear from REI or LL Bean!

1984.023.049 – I especially love this photo of men with their simple gear. Amazing to think they were able to mountain climb without stocking up on an array of fancy gear from REI or LL Bean!

Apparently playing in the snow is something that Marylanders – young and old – have always enjoyed as seen in these photos going back to the early 1900s. It is especially delightful to see a snow storm through the eyes of children.

1996.050.027i.004 – Ruth Weinberg, 1908

1996.050.027i.004 – Ruth Weinberg, 1908

1991.065.001.028c - boy in snow

1991.065.001.028c – boy in snow

CP.42.2012.001 – Charlotte and Michael Weiner, 1954/55

CP.42.2012.001 – Charlotte and Michael Weiner, 1954/55

Finding creative ways to enjoy the snow is also a timeless pursuit.

1996.163.064 – Fred and Walter Groebel playing in the snow

1996.163.064 – Fred and Walter Groebel playing in the snow

2009.026.199 – This could be my favorite photo of all

2009.026.199 – This could be my favorite photo of all

2010.020.283 – Sinai Nurses enjoying the snow, March 1942

2010.020.283 – Sinai Nurses enjoying the snow, March 1942

2009.014.005 – John Marsiglia with his dog, Mickey in Pikesville, 1992/1993 – Of course, not everything about the snow is fun but I’m sure the work goes much quicker when you have a pet by your side.

2009.014.005 – John Marsiglia with his dog, Mickey in Pikesville, 1992/1993 – Of course, not everything about the snow is fun but I’m sure the work goes much quicker when you have a pet by your side.

So good luck braving out our first epic storm of 2016. Be sure to take some photos to remember it by!

deborahA blog post by Deputy Director Deborah Cardin. To read more posts from Deborah click HERE.

 

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