In Honor of Mother’s Day

Posted on May 11th, 2017 by

I get “geeked out” looking at old things, stuff, history. I could spend hours looking through the JMM’s extensive collection that includes more than 11,000 objects, 55,000 photos and thousands of boxes of archival documents that tell the stories of more than two hundred years of everyday Jewish life in Maryland.

Being that Mother’s Day will be here this weekend, I thought it would be fun to do a search through the collections, and see what kinds of cool stuff I find about mothers.

Sepiatone photograph of Ella Gutman Hutzler with her two sons, Albert D. Hutzler and Joel Hutzler c. 1898, JMM 1991.26.9

Sepiatone photograph of Ella Gutman Hutzler with her two sons, Albert D. Hutzler and Joel Hutzler c. 1898, JMM 1991.26.9

Here is an image of one of the matriarchs of the famed Hutzler family, Ella Gutman Hutzler -wife of David Hutzler. Ella Gutman Hutzler (1855-1942) was the daughter of Joel Gutman, of Joel Gutman and Co., the first downtown department store (1852) located on Eutaw Street. Hutzler Brothers Company was founded in 1858 by Abram G. Hutzler, son of German-Jewish immigrants when he took over a small shop operated by his brother in-law, Elkan Bamberger. The original store dealt mainly in laces, fine fabrics and fancy goods, the majority of which were imported from Europe.

Ruth Greensfelder Frank, JMM 2010.60.12

Ruth Greensfelder Frank, JMM 2010.60.12

This is a lovely photograph taken in 1918 of Ruth Greensfelder Frank with her daughter Carol Jean Frank as a baby. .I was struck by the beauty of the mother and the simplicity of the photograph of mother and baby. How sweet!

JCC Collection, JMM 2006.13.430

JCC Collection, JMM 2006.13.430

This black and white photograph is from the JCC Collection. The photo is taken at a desk in the lobby at the Park Heights JCC in 1972. In this shot, there is a mother, her children, a stroller, along with other people. Our records indicate that there are many unidentified people in the photo. Can we be like the Baltimore Jewish Times- Can You Identify This Picture? If so, please contact Joanna Church, the JMM’s Collections Manage. Joanna’s email – jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

AMIT Women’s Chapter Collection, JMM 2000.128.26

AMIT Women’s Chapter Collection, JMM 2000.128.26

This little gold pendant is has the Hebrew word on it – EMA or mother. The pendant belonged to Sylvia Simmie/Sima Ziegler Schneider and was a symbol for the women’s group AMIT – American Mizrachi Women. AMIT is an American-based religious Zionist organization that was established in 1925. They first created vocational schools for religious girls in Palestine and have helped shape the educational and social welfare landscape in the State of Israel for nine decades.

Small Yellow Pin, JMM 2007.2.5

Small Yellow Pin, JMM 2007.2.5

I thought that this was so perfect for Mother’s Day! What nice Jewish kid does not want to support their own Jewish mother!

Barbara Levy Dackman, JMM 2017.6.1

Barbara Levy Dackman, JMM 2017.6.1

Finally, I could not finish this blogpost without including my own beautiful mother, Barbara Levy Dackman. Here she is posing on her wedding day (February 4, 1951), the portrait was taken by Bachrach Photographers which was founded here in Baltimore in 1868. The studio’s founder, David Bachrach, took the only photograph at Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. This painting of my mother now hangs in my brother’s home.

You can see this beautiful painting along with other things about brides, weddings and marriages starting on June 18th, at the JMM’s next original exhibition, Just Married! Wedding Stories From Jewish Maryland. The exhibit will be on display from June 18th through September 17th.

Happy Mother’s Day!

ileneA blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more posts by Ilene click HERE.

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Family Fare: Baltimore Jewish Food Businesses Part 2

Posted on May 10th, 2017 by

Article by Jennifer Vess. Originally published in Generations 2011 – 2012: Jewish Foodways

Part II: Immigration: “In the United States they would have an opportunity.”[1]

Missed part I? Start here.

The streets of America may not have been paved with gold at the beginning of the twentieth century, but immigrants flooded into the United States looking for opportunities.  A large number of Jewish immigrants chose food as their opportunity.  New arrivals could begin modestly and gradually build a business, supporting their families and even giving a boost to others.

Sol Grossfeld a baker from Radom, Poland immigrated to the United States in the 1920s and established the Warsaw Bakery with partner Solomon Hartman. Courtesy of Mrs. Gertrude Grossfeld Katz. JMM 1992.211.1

Sol Grossfeld a baker from Radom, Poland immigrated to the United States in the 1920s and established the Warsaw Bakery with partner Solomon Hartman. Courtesy of Mrs. Gertrude Grossfeld Katz. JMM 1992.211.1

Immigrants did not often arrive in America with much money, but even so many sought to support themselves rather than relying on employment in someone else’s business.  The Lozinsky family, for example, started as small as anyone could.  They “would take big baskets to the fish market, buy fish, and bring it back. Then they would stand on the sidewalk and sell the fish.”[2]   Others sold out of carts or stalls on the street or out of rooms in their homes.

These small shops supported more than just the immigrants who started them.  The benefits often spilled out to others in the immigrant Jewish community.  Once settled in America, men and women helped to bring over siblings and cousins and other extended family, sometimes giving them jobs until the new arrivals could move out on their own.  As Milton Schwartz of Crystal’s bakery explained, “Everybody that my parents would bring over from Europe, they gave them a job in the bakery. I had several cousins working there. Until they got their start in the New World and could go out on their own, they always had a job in our bakery doing something.”[3]

Nathan London, born in Russia, opened a kosher butcher shop on Lombard Street, c. 1900. Courtesy of George London. JMM 2001.109.1

Nathan London, born in Russia, opened a kosher butcher shop on Lombard Street, c. 1900. Courtesy of George London. JMM 2001.109.1

Some of the more successful businesses with large workforces gave jobs to new immigrants who were not relatives, perhaps remembering their own struggles trying to make a living.  Gustav Brunn (later the creator of Old Bay and owner of his own large company, Baltimore Spice) worked briefly for Wolf Salganik, the meat processor before striking out on his own.[4]  As late as the 1980s, Brunn’s workforce included a large number of recent immigrants from Europe and Asia.

In some cases settled immigrant families offered homes to newcomers.  Charles Bluefeld, whose wife later started Bluefeld catering, came to Baltimore without any connections.  When he immigrated in 1906 he boarded with the Schreiber family, who ran a meat business (and later a supermarket), though he had no connection to the family and did not work for them.  From earning money to providing a home food gave many immigrants a start.

Continue to Part III: Learning the Trade: “Baking was the only trade he knew.”

Notes:

[1] Dora Silber and Kathryn Sollins interview, n.d.,  OH 123, JMM.

[2] ibid.

[3] Milton Schwartz interview, November 9, 2005, OH 676, JMM.

[4] Louis and Philip Bluefeld, interview, August 6, 1979, OH 75, JMM; Gustav and Ralph Brunn interview, May 7, 1980, OH 112, JMM.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Once Upon a Time…08.12.2016

Posted on May 9th, 2017 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church by email at jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

 

2001040045Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  August 12, 2016

 

PastPerfect Accession #:  2001.40.45

 

Status: Unidentified! Do you recognize this woman in a very stylish hat, c. 1940?

 

 

 

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