Upcoming Events

May 2nd

No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank’s Story

Tuesday Night Film Series

Tuesday, May 2nd at 6:30pm

Included with Museum Admission – Buy Tickets Now

Members – Reserve Your Seats!

 

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A great treasure trove of history was lost in the mists of time for 70 years, until recently. A volunteer was sorting through boxes of dusty Holocaust manuscripts deep in the archives of YIVO, the Institute for Jewish Research, when she came upon a fragile envelope. She was stunned to find inside lost documents that detailed the desperate efforts of a loving father to save his family from the clutches of the Nazis. They were the letters of Otto Frank, Anne Frank’s father, and reveal his heartbreaking failure to find a safe haven for his daughters, Anne and Margot, and his wife Edith.

 

In No Asylum, Anne’s only surviving family members relate the emotional story of her family’s frantic search for sanctuary – Buddy Elias and Eva Schloss. Buddy, Anne’s cousin and best friend, speaks about their childhood and shares unseen family photographs and letters. He reveals Otto’s last letter before going into hiding, and sheds new light on their struggle for immigration. Read more here.

 

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Additional Films in the Series Include:
 
 

May 7th

Stories of Survival: Golda Kalib

Sunday, May 7th at 1:00pm

Included with museum admission – Get Your Tickets Here

Members – Reserve Your Seats Here

 

We are fortunate to live in a community where many Holocaust survivors have made it their mission to share their stories with both adult and student audiences.  We are privileged to welcome two survivors to JMM while Remembering Auschwitz is on view. Join us to hear the personal testimonies of these extraordinary women.

 

Born in Bodzentyn, Poland, Golda Kalib was very young at time of Nazi invasion. While initially hidden with a Christian family, she experienced the horrors of the Holocaust in a labor camp and Auschwitz.

 

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The public programs for this project were made possible by a grant from Maryland Humanities, through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or Maryland Humanities


May 7th

The Unexpected Generation: Polish Jews Discovering Their Roots, A Personal Story

Sunday, May 7th at 3:00 pm

Speaker Dr. Agi Legutko, Columbia University

Included with Museum Admission – Get Your Tickets Now

Museum Members – Reserve Your Seats

 

Dr. Agi Legutko

Imagine discovering—as a teenager or young adult—that your parents or grandparents hid their identity for their (and your) safety. How would you feel? What would you do? Ever since the fall of Communism in Poland in 1989, when Jewish matters stopped being a taboo subject, more and more people have discovered their Jewish roots. Scholars have named this phenomenon “The Unexpected Generation” or “The Third Generation of Polish Jews” since the Holocaust. This new generation, born mostly in the 1970s and 1980s, learned about their Jewishness as teenagers or young adults and began their journey to embrace their newly-found identity. Dr. Agi Legutko is one of them. Join us as we hear from Dr. Legutko about this fascinating phenomenon and her personal story of discovery.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Beth Tfiloh Sisterhood.

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The public programs for this project were made possible by a grant from Maryland Humanities, through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or Maryland Humanities