Calendar of Events

May 16th

Destination Unknown

Tuesday Night Film Series

Tuesday, May 16th at 6:30pm

Included with Museum Admission – Get Your Tickets Now

JMM Members – Reserve Your Seat!

 

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Twelve survivors, twelve families torn apart by the Holocaust, twelve people striving to build a new future after the war.

 

Blending unique and intimate testimony with immersive archive, DESTINATION UNKNOWN  unveils the human stories underlying the events of the Holocaust. These include one of the few escapees from the terror of Treblinka, and an exclusive interview with Mietek Pemper, who helped Oskar Schindler compile his List.

 

The film traces the narrow paths to survival, whether in hiding, fighting as partisans, or through enduring the camps such as Kraków-Płaszow, Mauthausen and Auschwitz-Birkenau. While a few managed to escape, most had to try to find a way to stay alive until the end of the war.

 

Their stories do not end with liberation. We see how they had to survive the chaos that came afterwards, and their attempts to build new lives. Read More.

 

Additional Films in the Series Include:
 
 

May 9th

Steven

Tuesday Night Film Series

Tuesday, May 9th at 6:30pm

Included with Museum Admission – Get Your Ticket Now

JMM Members – Reserve Your Seat!

 

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Steven is a video documentary  of the life of Steven Vogel, as narrated by Steven himself.  The video recollections describe life growing up in Budapest, Hungary in a religious Jewish home,  the experience of  seeing Nazi troops enter Budapest, Gestapo coming  to his home to arrest him and his mother and being taken to Auschwitz  in a cattle car where he and his mother  came face to face with Joseph Mengele.  The video describes his liberation and the  cunning maneuvers that lead to Steven Vogel being the first Hungarian citizen to receive a US immigration visa  following the war .

 

This video documentary  was created by Steven Vogel’s son,  Jim, not only as a  loving tribute to his father but also as a memory for grandchildren and generations that follow .    The video is a compilation of 17 years interviews and discussions between  Steven and Jim as well as an interview with the Steven Spielberg Shoah Project .  The video contains original  family photos and video from Budapest.

 

Following the screening join us for a talk back with filmmaker Jim Vogel.

 

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Additional Films in the Series Include:
 
 

May 7th

The Unexpected Generation: Polish Jews Discovering Their Roots, A Personal Story

Sunday, May 7th at 3:00 pm

Speaker Dr. Agi Legutko, Columbia University

Included with Museum Admission – Get Your Tickets Now

Museum Members – Reserve Your Seats

 

Dr. Agi Legutko

Imagine discovering—as a teenager or young adult—that your parents or grandparents hid their identity for their (and your) safety. How would you feel? What would you do? Ever since the fall of Communism in Poland in 1989, when Jewish matters stopped being a taboo subject, more and more people have discovered their Jewish roots. Scholars have named this phenomenon “The Unexpected Generation” or “The Third Generation of Polish Jews” since the Holocaust. This new generation, born mostly in the 1970s and 1980s, learned about their Jewishness as teenagers or young adults and began their journey to embrace their newly-found identity. Dr. Agi Legutko is one of them. Join us as we hear from Dr. Legutko about this fascinating phenomenon and her personal story of discovery.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Beth Tfiloh Sisterhood.

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The public programs for this project were made possible by a grant from Maryland Humanities, through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or Maryland Humanities