JMM Out and About

Posted on April 16th, 2014 by

Part of my role at the museum is to handle the reservations of one of our travelling exhibits, Jews on the Move: Baltimore and the Suburban Exodus, 1945 – 1968. The exhibit has been in storage for several months but is currently on display until April 14th at Beth Israel Synagogue.

In addition to displaying Jews on the Move, we also had an evening lecture there last week about some of the themes it highlights. The lecture, titled Jews on the move: A Conversation, was led by Dean Krimmel, a museum consultant who was a member of the team that developed the exhibit. The talk gathered a great audience and created a huge amount of conversation.

Dean Krimmel at Beth Israel

Dean Krimmel at Beth Israel

Dean started the lecture by asking a few questions, and he asked those who answered “yes” to stand. We were asked:

  • Were you part of the suburban exodus?
  • Were you born here in Baltimore?
  • Have you lived here for your adult life?
  • Are you a newcomer?
Getting some exercise at Beth Israel!

Getting some exercise at Beth Israel!

Unsurprisingly, the first two questions had a huge response, with most of the room standing. The final question, received a much smaller response, but it was interesting to see what people considered a newcomer to be. I knew I certainly would fit within this category, having only been here for a year. What surprised me was that people who had lived here their entire adult life still considered themselves newcomers! However, I quickly learned that, unless you went to high school in Baltimore, some will consider you a lifelong newcomer. This also led to another interesting point: this city is unique in that, when asked “what school did you attend?” you are not being asked about college but rather about high school.

The high point of the evening was hearing all of the conversations that were inspired by the program, both during the lecture and after, around the exhibit. People discussed their memories of moving to the suburbs, the reasons for doing so and some of the restrictions that they faced. Many people had similar experiences with regards to their suburban exodus, especially relating to their experiences with real estate agents.

We were also treated to a little of the history of Beth Israel and its movements by Bernie Raynor.

We were also treated to a little of the history of Beth Israel and its movements by Bernie Raynor.

There was also plenty of reminiscing prompted by images in the exhibit, especially regarding schools and shopping centers.

There was also plenty of reminiscing prompted by images in the exhibit, especially regarding schools and shopping centers.

 We also looked at some of the original advertisements for the newly built homes during the suburban exodus.

We also looked at some of the original advertisements for the newly built homes during the suburban exodus.

Overall, everyone had a lovely evening. The chatting continued for an hour after the lecture finished. Everyone shared memories and even remembered some things thought long forgotten.

Trillion BremenBlog post by Program Manager Trillion Attwood. To read more posts from Trillion, click here.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Once Upon a Time…10.04.2013

Posted on April 15th, 2014 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Jobi Zink, Senior Collections Manager and Registrar at 410.732.6400 x226 or jzink@jewishmuseummd.org.

 

2003035046Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  October 4, 2013

PastPerfect Accession #:  2003.035.046

Status:  Partially identified! B’nai B’rith Scholarship Breakfast at the state office in Pikesville, MD, n.d. 1. Unidentified 2. Unidentified 3. Unidentified 4. Ted Levin 5. Rose Hellman, Chair of the Baltimore County Board of Education. Do you recognize anyone else in this photo?

Special Thanks To: Stan Levin

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




THE SEARCH IS ON!

Posted on April 14th, 2014 by

Part 1 of a 3 part series on using the JMM On-line Database!

Q: What is the first step in conducting research on Jewish history in Maryland?

A: Checking out our free, searchable on-line database, of course! With 74,753 collections records on-line, you can get a good sense of what we have in our collection. Members and non-members currently have access to the database at jmm.pastperfect-online.com or from the collections-research page on our website.

We have just shy of 11,000 three-dimensional objects in the database, ranging from archaeological sherds in the Lloyd Street Synagogue mikveh, to stained glass windows, track trophies, National Bohemian advertising ephemera, beautiful dresses and military uniforms. I am delighted that nearly 89% of the objects in our collection have been photographed!

One of two stained glass skylights from the Komar Building, Baltimore. The skylights were removed from the balcony of the old theater and from the main stairwell of the building. The design of each skylight contains a central medallion featuring a Star of David. The lights are made of opalescent and cathedral glass. The theater skylight has a cartouche and fan motif surrounding the central medallion, the other skylight medallion is flanked by stylized floral emblems set in a geometric field; both lights c. 1915. 1993.038.002

One of two stained glass skylights from the Komar Building, Baltimore. The skylights were removed from the balcony of the old theater and from the main stairwell of the building. The design of each skylight contains a central medallion featuring a Star of David. The lights are made of opalescent and cathedral glass. The theater skylight has a cartouche and fan motif surrounding the central medallion, the other skylight medallion is flanked by stylized floral emblems set in a geometric field; both lights c. 1915. 1993.038.002

In just one year we have added 11,851 photograph records to our database, bringing us to 60,692 cataloged photographs!  With images attached to 73% of these photographs it’s like going through a gigantic photo album. Hopefully, you will find the images you are looking for.  I would like to thank volunteers Marvin Spector and Dana Willan who have scanned and cataloged the lion’s share of those new photos.

Volunteer Marvin Spector scans photos faster than we can attach them!

Volunteer Marvin Spector scans photos faster than we can attach them!

Our 20,459 archival records, however, pose a little bit more of a challenge to researchers looking for immediate (and complete visual) results. That is because our archival records are not digitized. Further, a single catalog record might describe one piece of paper or an entire manuscript collection filled with hundreds of folders filled with information. Don’t despair!  Our finding aids can help you narrow down your archival search. Once you’ve identified which records you are interested in looking at in person, you can contact research@jewishmuseummd.org or call 410-732-6402 ext.213 and set up a research appointment. Researching at the JMM is free for members and $8/visit for non-members.

Some of our collections are rather extensive! Become a member of the JMM and your research fees are waived.

Some of our collections are rather extensive! Become a member of the JMM and your research fees are waived.

Q: What if the first step of your research project hasn’t yielded the results you were hoping for?

A: This doesn’t necessarily mean that we don’t have what you are looking for, especially if you are searching for specialized biographical information.  While they aren’t in our collections database, we do have birth and death records, cemetery records, ship manifests, genealogies (family trees) and vertical files for many Jewish Marylanders who are not listed in our database.

A researcher works in our library.

A researcher works in our library.

The family history resource page of the JMM website has many sources that can help you out. We’ve just updated the links to the spreadsheets, so the information is current.  You can also contact our volunteer genealogist at familyhistory@jewishmuseummd.org  or call 410-732-6402 ext.224. Please have patience as it may take up to two weeks for someone to respond to your inquiry (remember, they are volunteers)!

 

Q: Still having trouble finding what you are looking for?

A:  Think about the specific question you are looking to answer. Write it down and read it to yourself.  If the question doesn’t make sense when you read it aloud, try to refine the question.  Once you’ve formulated your question – or maybe broken down your question into several components—give it a try. You can always send the question to research@jewishmuseummd.org or call 410-732-6402 ext.213, but it may take us a while to get back to you.

 

Happy searching!

A blog post by Senior Collections Manager Jobi Zink. To read more posts from Jobi, click here.

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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