Let’s Hit the Beach

Posted on August 24th, 2016 by

Julia Friedenwald making sand castles, Atlantic City, circa 1911. Gift of Julia Friedenwald Straus Potts. JMM 1984.23.789

Julia Friedenwald making sand castles, Atlantic City, circa 1911. Gift of Julia Friedenwald Straus Potts. JMM 1984.23.789

Late August means back-to-school sales, county fairs, friends posting on social media about how much they’re looking forward to fall, and – in my case – last-minute vacations. I myself grew up going to Bethany Beach, Delaware, but us mid-Atlantic residents are lucky in that we have many beaches and resorts to which we can pledge our loyalties.  A highly unscientific survey of our photo collections shows that Atlantic City, New Jersey, was a favorite for many Jewish Marylanders in the early 20th century.  I enjoy holiday snaps like these because, though the bathing costumes and boardwalks change, in some ways they don’t look all that different from the photos we might take on vacation today. If you, like me, will be going down the ocean* one last time before the summer ends, try recreating some of these views at your beach of choice.

Rosa and Pereth Cohen of Baltimore on the beach, Atlantic City, August 20, 1924.  Gift of Milford Siegel. JMM 1987.97.1

Rosa and Pereth Cohen of Baltimore on the beach, Atlantic City, August 20, 1924. Gift of Milford Siegel. JMM 1987.97.1

Members of the Jewish Educational Alliance clearly enjoying their time on the beach, Atlantic City, circa 1920. Gift of Jack Chandler. JMM 1992.231.247

Members of the Jewish Educational Alliance clearly enjoying their time on the beach, Atlantic City, circa 1920. Gift of Jack Chandler. JMM 1992.231.247

A page of the Weinberg family scrapbook, showing a variety of beach and boardwalk activities from a 1911 trip to Atlantic City.  Gift of Jan L. Weinberg. JMM 1996.50.27o

A page of the Weinberg family scrapbook, showing a variety of beach and boardwalk activities from a 1911 trip to Atlantic City. Gift of Jan L. Weinberg. JMM 1996.50.27o

Leonard Weinberg poses in front of the Steel Pier, Atlantic City, July 1918.  Gift of Jan L. Weinberg. JMM 1996.127.35

Leonard Weinberg poses in front of the Steel Pier, Atlantic City, July 1918. Gift of Jan L. Weinberg. JMM 1996.127.35

Hopefully these kids had fun during their beach day, but they look like they’re kind of over it now.  From a Friedenwald family trip to Atlantic City, circa 1925.  Gift of Julia Friedenwald Straus Potts. JMM 1984.23.631

Hopefully these kids had fun during their beach day, but they look like they’re kind of over it now. From a Friedenwald family trip to Atlantic City, circa 1925. Gift of Julia Friedenwald Straus Potts. JMM 1984.23.631

And finally, what may be my favorite beach snap in the collection – Harry Friedenwald asleep on the beach, under his straw hat. Unfortunately it’s not clear whether or not he requested that someone bury him in the sand. Atlantic City, circa 1911.  Gift of Julia Friedenwald Straus Potts. JMM 1984.23.807

And finally, what may be my favorite beach snap in the collection – Harry Friedenwald asleep on the beach, under his straw hat. Unfortunately it’s not clear whether or not he requested that someone bury him in the sand. Atlantic City, circa 1911. Gift of Julia Friedenwald Straus Potts. JMM 1984.23.807

*Confession: this is not a phrase that I grew up with (though I am a native Marylander, I promise!) – apologies if I am using it incorrectly.

JoannaA blog post by Collections Manager Joanna Church. To read more posts by Joanna click HERE.

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Once Upon a Time…12.18.2015

Posted on August 23rd, 2016 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church by email at jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

 

20060132466Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  December 18, 2015

 

PastPerfect Accession #:  2006.013.2466

 

Status:  Unidentified – A young girl learns how to sew at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, circa 1960

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Summer Teachers Institute Redux

Posted on August 22nd, 2016 by

Last week, the JMM held its 11th Annual Summer Teachers Institute (STI) in partnership with the Baltimore Jewish Council and the Maryland State Department of Education.  STI is a professional development opportunity for teachers in the area of Holocaust Education.  The goal of the program is to give educators the opportunity to meet with scholars and experts who are in the trenches of teaching best practices of Holocaust education.   The topic of the Holocaust is so vast, and over the years we have touched on topics of Persecution to Liberation, Rescue and Resistance and Propaganda.  This year’s topic was Art and Remembrance-and teachers learned how the Arts were such an integral part of how many survived through the dark period of WWII and the reign of the Nazis.

Summer Teachers Institute 2016

Summer Teachers Institute 2016

We had phenomenal presenters this year at STI.  Our last day of the seminar included a presentation by Bernice Steinhardt, Executive Director of Art and Remembrance, who spoke about the beautiful tapestries made by her mother Esther Nisenthal Krinitz.  We heard testimony from Mrs. Golda Kalib and we had master teachers in area schools share lessons on the Holocaust they use in their own classrooms.

My favorite presentation on Wednesday was from Gail Prensky and Sarah Baumgarten,  and The Jüdische Kulturbund Project.  From 1933-1941, the Jewish Kulturbund (Jüdischer Kulturbund), consisting of thousands of members at its peak, performed in 42 theatres across Germany. When the Kulturbund closed, some members emigrated or went into hiding; most were sent to the camps. This is a little-known story of the power of music, resiliency of the human spirit, and will to survive. The  Jüdische Kulturbund Project work with educators and music specialists to produce materials and engaging experiences for the classroom.

STI participants

STI participants

Gail and Sarah facilitated a very engaging session for teachers. The mood and scene that these educators set for teachers was tremendous.  For more than 30 minutes, the JMM sounded like a classroom of students, engaged and having fun exploring their environment.  The intention of the program was  to explore issues resulting from the choice artists make everyday living under oppression.  The goals of the program was to encourage discussion amongst the teachers about social and cultural history, theatre, and music- and encouraging educators to think of  how the story the Jüdische Kulturbund is relevant today.

Following the session, Gail shared the video that she took of the teachers having a terrific time engaged in learning.  Enjoy.

ileneA blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more posts by Ilene click HERE.

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