Performances Counts: We Missed You at Lunch

Posted on September 15th, 2017 by

Most of us reading this month’s newsletter were not at today’s “Get Discovered” volunteer recruitment lunch (but we’ve managed to discover you anyway!)

While it’s too late to send you a tuna sandwich, it’s not too late to think about how you (or your friends) can become engaged in one of the most exciting volunteer opportunities in Baltimore.

Leading a school group through Remembering Auschwitz: History, Holocaust Humanity

Leading a school group through Remembering Auschwitz: History, Holocaust Humanity

Since this is “Performance Counts”, let me share just a few stats.  Our volunteers last year included 7 front desk aides, 23 docents, 7 shop assistants, 13 library and archives aides, 28 special projects volunteers and 28 JMM Board members.  These 106 volunteers worked a total of 7557 hours.

>Front desk volunteers meet and greet visitors—including hundreds of teachers and chaperones on field trips to the JMM as they pass by on their way to Esther’s Place, the exhibit galleries and our historic synagogues.

>Docents conducted over 350 synagogue tours last year.

>Library and Archival volunteers scanned and uploaded more than 7,000 photos from the Baltimore Jewish Times, wrote folder lists for 24  boxes, just over 4,000 folders, in JMM’s institutional archives and processed two major new archival accessions, cataloguing them and creating finding aids.

>Other volunteers worked with Holocaust survivors or their families on 91 collages created for the Remembering Auschwitz exhibit.

>Still even more volunteers judged 93 projects for the My Family Story competition.

Even with these impressive stats, we still can do better and that’s why we held a lunch today to let new prospects learn more about the work we have available.

Welcome Wendy!

Welcome Wendy!

It was also a chance to introduce folks to our Volunteer Coordinator, Wendy Davis!  So since most of us weren’t there today, I’m going to let Wendy introduce herself:

I am excited and honored to be the new volunteer coordinator at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  My awareness of the Lloyd Street synagogue began way back in the 1960s.  As a teenager, I went with a group of fellow teens to see the synagogue at the beginning of the renovation process. And my father, Gordon Salganik, has been supportive of the Museum almost since its inception.  Now it is my turn to support the JMM.

For the past four years I have thoroughly enjoyed being a volunteer docent at JMM. Before my retirement and volunteering at JMM, I was a speech language pathologist in Baltimore City Public Schools. Now, I have a long wish list of things I would like to accomplish as the volunteer coordinator beyond monthly scheduling of the volunteers.  Establishing a lending library for the volunteers, improving our knowledge of the museum’s neighbors, dealing with fellow volunteers’ concerns and addressing their wish lists, and increasing our volunteer corps are at the top of my list!  The best way all this can be accomplished is with the collaboration and support of the wonderful JMM staff and volunteers that are my privilege to call colleagues.

I invite you to drop by to welcome Wendy.  Better yet, make her day by asking her how you can become a colleague at JMM.  Get discovered.

~Marvin

Testing out educational activities for the upcoming Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage exhibit!

Testing out educational activities for the upcoming Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage exhibit!

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Back To School

Posted on September 14th, 2017 by

A blog post by Deputy Director Deborah Cardin. To read more posts from Deborah click HERE.

Yes, it’s true. Summer is over. While the official end of the season is not for another week, as we move past Labor Day, our thoughts turn from planning outings to the pool and beach to endless trips to Staples and Target for school supplies and uniforms. In honor of the back to school season, I thought I’d take the opportunity to share with you photos from our collections. Just a quick peruse through our database demonstrates the sheer volume of pictures from both secular and religious schools. I especially loved the photos from earlier generations and was delighted to find some from as far back as the 1890s. As we all come to terms with the loss of summer, I hope you will enjoy these photos as much as I do (perhaps in between another dash to the supermarket for lunch supplies!)

Elementary School #3, C. 1890. JMM 1991.35.20d

Elementary School #3, C. 1890. JMM 1991.35.20d

Talmud Torah, Jackson Place, c. 1911. JMM 1983.19.4

Talmud Torah, Jackson Place, c. 1911. JMM 1983.19.4

Beloved teacher, Hyman Saye, teaches at the Talmud Torah, 1928. JMM 1991.7.13

Beloved teacher, Hyman Saye, teaches at the Talmud Torah, 1928. JMM 1991.7.13

Baltimore Hebrew Congregation’s religious school, 1916. JMM 1991.6.1

Baltimore Hebrew Congregation’s religious school, 1916. JMM 1991.6.1

Isaac Davison High School graduation class, 1942. JMM 1997.196.3

Isaac Davison High School graduation class, 1942. JMM 1997.196.3

Students participating in the school orchestra, Florence Nightingale School. JMM 1992.27.1

Students participating in the school orchestra, Florence Nightingale School. JMM 1992.27.1

I was delighted to find a photo of graduating high school students from my alma mater, The Park School, 1927. JMM 1991.126.12

I was delighted to find a photo of graduating high school students from my alma mater, The Park School, 1927. JMM 1991.126.12

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The American Delegate(s)* at the First Zionist Congress Part 4

Posted on September 13th, 2017 by

Written by Avi Y. Decter. Originally published in Generations 2007-2008: Maryland and Israel

Sidebar I: The Other Americans: Rosa Sonneschein (1847 – 1935)

Missed the beginning? Start here.

Rosa Sonnenschein, from The American Jewess. Courtesy of the University of Michigan.

Rosa Sonnenschein, from The American Jewess. Courtesy of the University of Michigan.

Rosa Sonneschein was a pioneering journalist, the founder of the first English-language magazine for Jewish women in the United States. In the pages of her magazine, The American Jewess, she promoted the National Council of Jewish Women and the Zionist movement. She had the distinction of attending both the first and second Zionist Congresses, reporting on the Congress in the pages of her journal.

Rosa Fassel was born in Moravia and grew up in Hungary, where she received excellent secular and Judaic educations, IN 1864 she married Solomon Hirsch Sonneschein, a radical Reform rabbi with a congregation in Croatia. After several moves the couple settled in St. Louis, where Mrs. Sonneschein was active in Jewish and German cultural life. By the mid-1880s Sonneschein had begun to publish stories in Jewish periodicals and in the German-language press.

In 1891 she separated from her husband; their divorce was finalized in 1893. Shortly after, Sonneschein participated in the Jewish Women’s Congress, which created the National Council of Jewish Women. In April 1895 she began editing The American Jewish. During the next four years she advocated for the expansion of women’s roles in the Synagogue and the Jewish community. She was also a staunch supporter of the Zionist idea, of Theodor Herzl, and of the Zionist Congress.

When financial difficulties forced the closing of The American Jewess in 1899, Sonneschein continued to write and travel, but was never again publicly active in Jewish women’s organizations or the Zionist movement. She died in St. Louis, where she had resided intermittently in her daughter’s home.[1]

Continue to Sidebar II: The Other Americans: Davis Treitsch (1870 – 1935)

[1] Jane H. Rothstein, “Sonneschein, Rosa,” in Jewish Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia (New York: Rutledge, 1997), 1289-1291.

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