YES, MAAM!

Posted on October 30th, 2017 by

A blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more posts by Ilene click HERE.

Last Thursday, I got up early, hopped on my chariot, and headed to Pittsburgh for the Annual Conference for the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums (aka MAAM).   The mission of MAAM is to support and promote excellence, ethics, and accessibility in museum practices; and to make the museums of the Mid-Atlantic region better able to preserve and interpret our diverse cultural, scientific, and aesthetic heritage. I was invited to Pittsburgh as I was recently nominated to serve as a Member at Large on the Board of MAAM to represent the State of Maryland.

The  teeniest of planes!

The teeniest of planes!

The three day conference was jam packed filled with sessions, museum visits, board meetings and just meeting a lot of very nice like-minded museum professionals. On Thursday, we visited the Rivers of Steel National Heritage where we learned about the Carrie Furnaces No. 6 and 7, which are rare examples of pre-World War II iron-making technology. Built in 1907, the furnaces produced iron for the Homestead Works from 1907 to 1978. Since the collapse of the region’s steel industry in the 1970s and 1980s, these are the only non-operative blast furnaces in the Pittsburgh District to remain standing.

The Carrie Furnaces

The Carrie Furnaces

We visited the Frick Pittsburgh where we were treated to a preview of a very fun exhibition on loan from London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, Undressed -The History of Underwear in Fashion. The exhibition illustrates how undergarments reflect society’s changing ideas about the body, morality, and sex, and the intimate relationship between underwear and fashion. Thursday evening we were treated to a reception at the Phipps Conservatory and saw the beautiful glass sculpture and art of Jason Gamrath.

Day Two of the conference was spent in sessions – I was attracted to attending sessions on education and was also treated to the keynote address from Ruth Abram, co-founder of the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and who has also worked on other projects like the Sites of Conscience and Behold, New Lebanon!  On Saturday, I had the opportunity to visit the Heinz History Center and saw the set of Mister Rogers Neighborhood and also celebrated the 100th birthday of Charlie the Tuna!

Happy Birthday Charlie!

Happy Birthday Charlie!

One of things that impressed me most about the MAAM organization is its desire to foster and mentor emerging professionals in the museum field. One of the best moments that I had of the weekend was seeing former JMM intern, Emma Glaser.  Emma interned with the JMM over the summer of 2014 and was instrumental in helping us plan education activities in connection with the Mendes Cohen exhibition. Following Emma’s internship, she contacted me about providing her a letter of recommendation, she wanted to apply to graduate school for museum studies. I was absolutely thrilled to see Emma at the conference and see how learn how happy she is studying in  the Graduate Program for Museum Studies in Cooperstown, New York in her chosen field of study!

 

Hi Emma!

Hi Emma!

YES, MAAM!!!!

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




A Chicken Challenge!

Posted on October 27th, 2017 by

Blog post by JMM archivist Lorie Rombro. You can read more posts by Lorie here.

October 24th was our members event, Feast of Flavors: A Cooking Demo and Tasting for our new exhibit. Vered Guttman, a food writer, came and gave a cooking demo of Iraqi Jewish foods. All the recipes looked incredible but I really wanted to try making Tbeet, a Jewish Iraqi chicken and rice dish. I knew this was something my family would like and was different from what I usually made. We are an adventurous group when it comes to food and my husband and children always like to try something new. The recipe also looked easy, I’m not a bad cook but I really don’t have much time to put into making meals and a one pot recipe is always appreciated.

Vered shows off the ideal chicken at the Feast of Flavors cooking demo.

Vered shows off the ideal chicken at the Feast of Flavors cooking demo.

The audience was told to get a nice big plump bird, a fryer, so the chicken did not dry out. After 7 phone calls with my husband, who I sent out for the chicken, this was finally accomplished. You began by mixing the spices with the dried rice and stuffing the bird with the mixture and then tying the legs and closing the front with toothpicks so the rice doesn’t fall out. That part was a bit easier said than done. After breaking many tooth picks, I gave up and hoped for the best.

Stuffing the chicken with rice.

Stuffing the chicken with rice.

Tying the chicken shut.

Tying the chicken shut.

When the chicken was finally in the pot you cover it with more spices, cumin, cardamon, turmeric, paprika and pepper, add water and cover the chicken with what seemd like a large amount of rice. The eggs are added on top, everything is covered in tinfoil and placed it in the oven overnight at 225.

A well spiced chicken!

A well spiced chicken!

The finished product - delicious!

The finished product – delicious!

The next morning the kitchen smelled wonderful and the chicken was unwrapped and looked delicious. My eggs came out a little weird, but the chicken was moist and falling off the bone. This did make it a bit hard to find the chicken in the mounds of rice, and I think I will use less rice next time. But last night we all enjoyed the Tbeet and I will make this again. It actually was fun; the whole family was involved in our experiment and we not only had a delightful meal but we spent time together trying something new.

Want to give it a try yourself? Here's the recipe Vered shared with us!

Want to give it a try yourself? Here’s the recipe Vered shared with us! 

You can download a PDF of this recipe here.

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Finding Houdini in Scranton

Posted on October 26th, 2017 by

We continue our new blog series, Finding Houdini, from magician and storyteller David London, who will be serving as a guest curator for our upcoming exhibition exploring the life and legacy of Harry Houdini. In this post, David brings us along to his visit to the Houdini Museum in Scranton, PA. To read all the posts in this series, click HERE.


The  Houdini Museum in Scranton, PA

The Houdini Museum in Scranton, PA

The first stop on my “Finding Houdini” tour brought me to the Houdini Museum in Scranton, PA. Throughout his career, Houdini appeared in Scranton numerous times, and performed throughout Pennsylvania. The museum is run by Dorothy Dietrich (The Female Houdini) and Dick Brooks (Bravo The Great). Dorothy and Dick have a long history in the world of magic, working with many of the greats in the world of illusion, previously managing “The Magic Towne House” in New York City. Additionally, Dorothy and Dick restored the bust on Houdini’s grave gravesite, which had been damaged or destroyed numerous times throughout its history. They were also critical in facilitating the re-release of a long-lost Houdini film, The Grim Game, and are currently producing a Houdiniopoly boardgame! These are life-long caretakers of Houdini’s legacy, and it was an honor to arrive at their museum.

I was welcomed to the museum with open arms and open hearts, The amazing tour of the museum, which is offered daily in the summer, and on weekends the rest of the year, is filled with many exciting artifacts and masterfully told stories of Houdini’s life and career. The tour ends with a live show with the entire experience lasting over three hours!

Some great Houdini ephemera. Check out that peek at "Houdini-opoly"!

Some great Houdini ephemera. Check out that peek at “Houdiniopoly”!

Housed in the museum are several pairs Houdini handcuffs, signed books, a reproduction of the Water Torture Cell, and countless photos, posters, and ephemera. Some of the most exciting items at the Houdini Museum in Scranton are objects from Houdini’s apartment at 278 W. 113th Street, which Houdini fans and historians refer to it as simply “278,” including Houdini’s telephone, phonograph, and beautiful gold framed portraits of his parents.

Me with the wonderful museum runners Dorothy Dietrich and Dick Brooks!

Me with the wonderful museum runners Dorothy Dietrich and Dick Brooks!

But truthfully, the best part of my visit was spending time with Dorothy and Dick. After the tour, we went to dinner and shared our passion for Houdini and the strange and wonderful world of magic. We reflected on the unbelievable but real-life story of Houdini and by the time I departed, I had not only seen the first incredible collection on my tour, but also made new friends. And that’s the real magic of magic!

“My brain in the key that sets me free” -Houdini

“My brain in the key that sets me free”
-Houdini

In my upcoming posts, I will be sharing my adventures in Wisconsin, New York, New Jersey, Ohio and Washington, DC, as I continue my search for Houdini. Stay tuned…

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




« Previous PageNext Page »