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Event:
Eavesdropping On Hell
Start:
August 10, 2014 3:00 pm
End:
August 10, 2014 4:30 pm
enigma

Sunday, August 10, 3:00pm

 

Speaker Dr. David Hatch

 

 

From James Bond to Bletchley Circle, Code Makers and Breakers Inspire the Imagination

Hear the Real Stories Behind 4 Jewish Code Breakers

From Navajo Windtalkers to the women of Bletchley Circle, the mysterious world of codes, ciphers and those who make and break them has proven fertile ground for the imagination, inspiring authors, filmmakers, and television producers to tell their stories. This Sunday join us at the Jewish Museum of Maryland as Dr. David Hatch shares some of the true stories about the minds behind America’s efforts in cryptology surrounding World War II.

 

 

On loan from the National Cryptologic Museum, Dr. Hatch will focus on four Jewish men working for the U.S. Army. They, along with others, developed techniques and technology vital to breaking Axis codes and ciphers – and even created a cipher of their own for the United States. For national security reasons the contributions of these men and their colleagues were kept secret for decades after the war. Now is your chance to hear those secrets. As a bonus the National Cryptologic Museum has loaned an original enigma machine to the Jewish Museum of Maryland, which will be on display for one day only.

 

 

Dr. Hatch’s presentation, Eavesdropping From Hell, takes place at 3:00pm on Sunday, August 10th at the Jewish Museum of Maryland at the Herbert Bearman Campus. The program is included with museum admission. Check our website (www.jewishmuseummd.org) or contact Trillion Attwood, tattwood@jewishmuseummd.org/ 410-732-6400 x215 for more program information.

 

 

About Dr. David Hatch

 

 

Dr. David A. Hatch has a master’s degree in East Asian Studies from Indiana University, Bloomington, and a Ph.D. in International Relations from American University in the District of Columbia.  After service with the U.S. Army, he took a position with the National Security Agency in 1973.  He spent nearly two decades as an analyst, staff officer, and supervisor.  In 1990, he transferred to NSA’s Center for Cryptologic History; following a convoluted series of retirements and reorganizations, he became the Agency’s Historian.  He is the author of a number of classified and unclassified histories about cryptology and NSA.