JMM Insights: Welcome to the Team

Posted on August 18th, 2017 by

This month’s JMM Insights is from our newest team member, Lorie Rombro.

Hi! My name is Lorie Rombro and I am the JMM’s brand new archivist.

Hi! My name is Lorie Rombro and I am the JMM’s brand new archivist.

I have always enjoyed museums and, after college where I studied Archaeology and Anthropology, I went for a Masters in Museum Studies from George Washington University. That was an incredible experience; many of our classes were at the Smithsonian. Getting a chance to explore behind the scenes in the museums after they closed to the public really sparked my love of collections and archives.

I have spent the majority of my career until now working in historic house museums as well as assisting a donor in starting a museum in San Antonio, Texas.  My free time is spent with my husband, my two boys and our dog, Bowzer, which keeps me very busy!

The JMM Archives Room, where I've been spending a lot of my time!

The JMM Archives Room, where I’ve been spending a lot of my time!

This is my third week as the Archivist at the Jewish Museum of Maryland and so far this has been an amazing experience. I didn’t have a chance to physically see the JMM archives before I accepted the job, and now that I’ve had a chance to dive in I’m overwhelmed by just how much information is housed here! Our archives cover the rich and vibrant history of the Jews in Maryland, and there is a lot of it.

So I am exploring, which has always been one of my favorite parts of working in a museum. I am from Baltimore and, although I think I know my own history, I have been learning so much about the Jewish history of Maryland and the institutions, organizations and people who built our community.

So many things to see in our online collections!

So many things to see in our online collections!

As an explorer, of course I had to look up my own last name in the Past Perfect Collection Database (which is available online).   I wasn’t expecting to find anything, so I was pretty excited when a Bluefeld Caterers receipt from my father’s Bar Mitzvah in 1958 came up!  It seems like such a small thing but that one piece of paper led to an amazing conversation with my father.

A humble receipt leads to so much more!

A humble receipt leads to so much more!

My father showed me his Bar Mitzvah photo album, which I had never seen before. It was the first time I had ever seen a photo of his great grandmother and some of my own great grandparents. I learned more about my history from a catering receipt then I thought possible. It’s why preserving the past is so important and shows how much one piece of paper may mean to future generations. (Also as a parent of a 12 year old boy and planning a Bar Mitzvah myself I was really impressed with the $4 dollar a person catering price.)

I can’t wait to see what else I will discover as the archivist at the Jewish Museum of Maryland!

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Can’t Touch This: Voices from the Basement Part 1

Posted on August 17th, 2017 by

This summer we asked our summer interns to team up and create their very own podcast episodes. Over the course of ten weeks they needed to pitch a concept, draft a script, and record and edit their podcasts. We’re going to share those podcasts here with you on the blog over the course of the next few weeks! You can see all of their podcasts by clicking on the intern podcast tag.


 

Interns Joelle and Amy posing with one of the many historic dresses they worked with this summer.

Interns Joelle and Amy posing with one of the many historic dresses they worked with this summer.

The first podcast episodes in this special series were created by collections interns Joelle Paull and Amy Swartz to focus on the care and handling of museum collections. They had so much to talk about that they elected to create three episodes – the first is focused on textiles, a subject they got first hand experience with as they assisted with the installation of our Just Married! Wedding Stories from Jewish Maryland exhibit. Below are some images and resources related to their podcast Can’t Touch This, episode 1.

>>Listen to the Podcast<<


 

Wedding dress made of silk with beadwork on bodice and skirt, worn by Bessie Grossman when she married Louis Paymer, Jan. 3, 1911. Gift of Zelda Paymer Salkin and Lenore Paymer Snyder. JMM 1986.109.1

Wedding dress made of silk with beadwork on bodice and skirt, worn by Bessie Grossman when she married Louis Paymer, Jan. 3, 1911. Gift of Zelda Paymer Salkin and Lenore Paymer Snyder. JMM 1986.109.1

Many hours were spent carefully steaming out wrinkles.

Many hours were spent carefully steaming out wrinkles.


Resources on how to handle textiles:

How to Handle Antique Textiles and Costumes from the Smithsoniam Museum Conservation Institute

Curatorial Care of Textile Objects from the National Park Service

Care of Historic Clothing and Textiles from the University of Georgia

Caring for Your Treasures: Textiles from the American Institute for Conservation


 

Each of these mannequins has their own name and were used for displaying textiles in the Just Married! exhibit.

Each of these mannequins has their own name and were used for displaying textiles in the Just Married! exhibit.


Why you shouldn’t use blue tissue paper to store your wedding dress!

 

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Once Upon a Time…11.18.2016

Posted on August 15th, 2017 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church by email at jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

JMM 2000.144.51

JMM 2000.144.51

Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  November 18, 2016

PastPerfect Accession #:  2000.144.51

Status: Identified! Joan Diskin, Marcella Glickstein, Nathan Mash, unknown, and Margit Spitzer receiving a check.

Thanks To: Sharon Wolfe, Sileen Frank, Honey Littman, Layne Herman, Bud Koback, Alvin Lapides, Barbara Stadd, and anonymous

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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