When the Collections Are Not What They Seem

Posted on November 2nd, 2016 by

Researching a new exhibit can have unexpected side benefits, including the opportunity to learn even more about our collections.  The “more product, less process” method of archival work means we do our best to get at least minimal access to our archival collections as quickly as possible, but it also means that researchers – including museum staff ourselves – need to dig a little deeper when our records tell us the collection contains something of interest.  This can be frustrating, in a world where so much content is instantly available at your fingertips… but it’s also very fun.  (And, of course, our further investigations are recorded, so the next person has a slightly easier task.)

As we prepare for next summer’s Just Married! exhibit, it’s been my happy job to delve into the archives and take a closer look at everything wedding-related.  Whenever our previous catalogers noted a “bridal book,” “wedding sermon,” or “engagement card” calling out for more specific description, there am I, like a superhero researcher… okay, that metaphor doesn’t really work.  But nevertheless, thanks to the heavy lifting of the initial catalogers, I know where to look for the goodies, and I can swoop in and finish the job.

There have been lots of great discoveries in this process, and a few disappointments as well.  Here’s one of the latter: a fun piece in itself, but not quite what I was expecting…

Outside:

JMM 1993.63.24

JMM 1993.63.24

Inside:

JMM 1993.62.24

Announcement card, late 1930s. Donated by Sadie B. Feldman, JMM 1993.63.24

Fake-out! It’s not a delightful wedding announcement card, as it appears at first glance; it’s delightful advertisement for the work of Baltimore artist and designer Samson Feldman (1900-1983). So, in a sense, this ad did exactly its job: it drew my attention – promising one thing, then, surprise! it turned out to be something else – and it was memorable, since it was the first thing I thought of when it came time to write this blog.  The work of Samson Feldman (1900-1983) will likely be featured in Just Married!, along with several other Maryland artists who produced ketubahs, invitations, and the like.  But this particular piece is not quite what I was hoping for.

Alos, don’t forget – we want your wedding invitations and photos! Check out our Marrying Maryland” page for more info.

JoannaA blog post by Collections Manager Joanna Church. To read more posts by Joanna click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Once Upon a Time…02.12.2016

Posted on November 1st, 2016 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church by email at jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

 

1994021031Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  February 12, 2016

 

PastPerfect Accession #:  1994.021.031

 

Status: Installation of Independent Order of Brith Sholom officers, including Aaron Friedlander and Irv Ravitz, circa 1970. All others unidentified!

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Once Upon a Time…02.05.2016

Posted on October 25th, 2016 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church by email at jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

 

1988142091Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  February 5, 2016

PastPerfect Accession #:  1988.142.091

Status: Students at Ner Israel Rabbinical College, circa 1965. Left to right: Yitzchok Lowenbraun, Chaim Nachman Gornish of Philadelphia, Zev Beren of Denver, Leonard Oberstein of Alabama, unknown, Meir Schechter, and Avraham Bartfield of Mexico City.

 Thanks to: Rabbi Yitzchok Lowenbraun

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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