Generations 2007-2008: Bridges to Zion: Maryland and Israel

Posted on November 9th, 2016 by

Generations 2007-2008: Bridges to Zion: Maryland and Israel

Table of Contents

Introduction by Avi Y. Decter and Deborah R. Weiner – download as pdf

An American in Palestine: Mendes I. Cohen Tours the Holy Land by Deborah R. Weiner – download as pdf

The American Delegate(s)* at the First Zionist Conference by Avi Y. Decter – download as pdf

Revolutionizing Experiences: Henrietta Szold’s First Visit to the Holy Land by Henrietta Szold – download as pdf

Why I was a Zionist and Why I Now Am Not by Rabbi Morris S. Lazaron

“Israel” by Karl Schapiro

Mahal Days by Raphael Ben-Yosef

Photo Gallery: Maryland Philanthropy and Israel by Rachel Kassman

The Blaustein-Ben-Gurion Agreement: A Milestone in Israel-Diaspora Relations by Mark K. Bauman

The Comeback Kid: Leon Uris Returns to City College, 1995 by Rona Hirsch

“Who is a Jew” by Shoshana S. Cardin

Book Review: A Dream of Zion: American Jews Reflect on Why Israel Matters to Them by Melvin I. Urofsky

Field Notes: The Jewish Journey: The Jewish Museum in New York by Fred Wasserman

Chronology: Maryland and Israel

Cost: $10

To order a print copy of Generations 2007-2008, please contact Esther’s Place, the JMM Museum Shop at 443-873-5179 or email Devan Southerland, Museum Shop Assistant at dsoutherland@jewishmuseummd.org.

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Graham Goes to Washington!

Posted on May 30th, 2016 by

Over the past few days, I (along with most of the staff at the JMM), attended the American Alliance of Museum’s (AAM) annual conference in DC. This is my third AAM conference and I am always amazed by the scale of the event. Roughly 6,000 museum professionals from around the world attended. Throughout my time at the conference, I sat in on sessions on volunteer management, accessibility, audience engagement, docent training and how to effectively supervise college interns. I also socialized with present and former colleagues and made lots of new contacts in the museum community.

The first session I went on to on Thursday was titled “Embracing the Power of Older Adult Volunteers.”

The first session I went on to on Thursday was titled “Embracing the Power of Older Adult Volunteers.”

As Ilene Cohen, our current volunteer coordinator will be leaving us shortly and I’ll be taking over some of her responsibilities, I thought it would be a good idea to get some tips about how to advocate for our fabulous volunteer corp. At the session, I learned techniques for training older adult volunteers on technology and got some suggestions of places to recruit for new volunteers.

I then went to the MuseumExpo exhibit hall where I browsed through exhibitors relating to audio tours, admissions, educational programs and regional museum associations. I met with a representative from Blackbaud to get some tips about the new Altru ticketing/donor management system which we will be implementing soon at the Museum.

I also tried out a virtual reality station about the Wright Brothers flight and bought two books to help me in my current position.

I also tried out a virtual reality station about the Wright Brothers flight and bought two books to help me in my current position.

I then went to a session called “Museums for All,” which was about an initiative developed by the Institute of Museum of Library Services. This program offers free or reduced admission to museums across the country to low-income families. I discovered that this is a great way to broaden our visitor base, reach out to under-served audiences, and perhaps most importantly, to be socially conscious and inclusive. In the coming weeks, I hope to implement it at the JMM.

In the evening, I went to a Happy Hour from the Museum Education Roundtable and another one sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Museum Studies program, which I graduated from a few years ago.

In the evening, I went to a Happy Hour from the Museum Education Roundtable and another one sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Museum Studies program, which I graduated from a few years ago.

On Friday, I went to a session called “60 Great Ideas for Historic Sites and Historic Homes” where I got lots of ideas ranging from improving the visitor experience to forming new partnerships and increasing attendance at special events.

I then went to the General Session where Robert Edsel, author of the Monuments Men, spoke about the legacy of the Monuments Men, the unsung heroes (both men and women), who saved the world’s greatest art and cultural treasures during World War II. He challenged all of us to become advocates for the return of artwork to their rightful owners and reminded us that modern day monuments men and women are still working to safeguard our cultural heritage in war torn-places like Iraq and Syria.

A packed general session!

A packed general session!

In the afternoon, I went to the Marketplace of Ideas “Small Museums Talk Volunteers and Sustainability,” where I got to brainstorm with other volunteer managers about issues that we have been facing at JMM.

On Saturday, I went to a session on “Training 21st century Docents” where I learned the importance of encouraging more participation and discussion into tours and sharing best practices among the docents. I also got ideas such as field trip exchanges to other museums to see how they do their tours and ways to incorporate direct feedback at the end of each tour.

I then had lunch with an intern from a prior position, visited “Crosslines,” a two day exhibit featuring  artists and scholars at the newly restored Arts and Industries Building, and met up with a former boss and mentor.

I concluded my experience with a stop by the Party “Inside the Great American Outdoors” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. I felt privileged to be able to explore the museum after-hours with many of my colleagues.

I concluded my experience with a stop by the Party “Inside the Great American Outdoors” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. I felt privileged to be able to explore the museum after-hours with many of my colleagues.

To sum up, I had a jam-packed time at the conference and came away with many takeaways which I hope to implement at the JMM.

GrahamA blog post by Graham Humphrey, Visitor Services Coordinator. To read more posts by Graham click HERE.

 

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Fancy Conference Badges, 1909-1937

Posted on May 25th, 2016 by

Tomorrow is the first day of the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Alliance of Museums, held this year in Washington, D.C.  Many of us are planning to attend, and in the upcoming days you’ll see plenty of social media updates as we enjoy several days of camaraderie, learning, and swag from the Expo Hall.

When we register tomorrow, we’ll get our nametags, printed clearly on heavy paper and perhaps strung on a nice branded lanyard. Now, I know that organizing several thousand badges is neither simple nor inexpensive, but for a meeting related to museums – many of which include historical collections – it always seems a shame that there’s no nod to the substantial, and considerably more glam, name badges of the past.

I do like an artifact that conveniently provides its own history, and convention badges of the late 19th to mid 20th century fit that bill. Granted, so do most badges from modern conferences, since the point is to state your name and location regardless of the materials of which it’s made. But while we’ll most likely get a piece of paper slipped into a clear plastic sleeve (which one is, rightfully, encouraged to recycle at the end of the event), our predecessors received a thing, meant to be saved: Satin ribbons with shiny printing, bright colors proclaiming one’s regional or professional allegiance, elaborate metal badges, gold fringe, and other embellishments, usually topped off with a small, discreet slot for the attendee’s name. Many cities had companies devoted to the production of these badges, and a big convention coming to town meant money for them as well as for the associated venues, caterers, and hotels.

Badge manufacturers in Baltimore, from the 1909-1910 Baltimore Business Directory (R.L. Polk).  Gift of Peppy Zulver. JMM 1990.168.2

Badge manufacturers in Baltimore, from the 1909-1910 Baltimore Business Directory (R.L. Polk). Gift of Peppy Zulver. JMM 1990.168.2

Since I’m not likely to get my wish this weekend, here are a few examples from our collection. I hope you’ll never be quite satisfied with your flimsy conference name tags again!

Satin ribbon with safety pin, made by G.N. Meyer Mfg., Washington, D.C. “Conference on the Care of Dependent Children, Called by President Theodore Roosevelt, Jan. 25-26 1909, Washington, D.C.”  Gift of Judge Jacob M. Moses. JMM 1963.42.13c

Satin ribbon with safety pin, made by G.N. Meyer Mfg., Washington, D.C. “Conference on the Care of Dependent Children, Called by President Theodore Roosevelt, Jan. 25-26 1909, Washington, D.C.” Gift of Judge Jacob M. Moses. JMM 1963.42.13c

Baltimore’s Jacob Moses, then Judge of the Juvenile Court of Maryland, was invited to speak at this conference in D.C. In his opening address, President Roosevelt urged attendees to “take a progressive stand, so as to establish a goal toward which the whole country can work.” Judge Moses’s speech – which a pencil notation on the top indicates was only to be “five minutes” – was entitled “How the Juvenile Court May Protect the Young Child.”

Left: Satin ribbon with metal badges, including the skyline of Milwaukee. “Nathan Trupp – Baltimore. Delegate 34th Annual Convention, July 6-7-8-9 1931. National Association of Retail Grocers.” Right: Satin ribbon with enamel and metal badges. “Maryland at the Chicago Convention 1934. National Association of Retail Grocers. Nathan Trupp, Baltimore, Md.”

Left: Satin ribbon with metal badges, including the skyline of Milwaukee. “Nathan Trupp – Baltimore. Delegate 34th Annual Convention, July 6-7-8-9 1931. National Association of Retail Grocers.”
Right: Satin ribbon with enamel and metal badges. “Maryland at the Chicago Convention 1934. National Association of Retail Grocers. Nathan Trupp, Baltimore, Md.”  Both gift of Irwin Kramer. JMM 2006.31.12, .15

 

Nathan Trupp of Baltimore served as President of the Maryland Grocer’s Association in the 1930s. He attended several National Association conferences across the U.S.  In 1931, in Milwaukee, President Hoover sent greetings to the foreign attendees on behalf of U.S. delegates; in 1934 in Chicago, attendees were able to enjoy the Century of Progress International Exhibition.

Satin badge with metal and enamel badges, and metallic fringe. “Member, The Royal Sisters Society of Baltimore, Inc.”  Gift of Helen Glaser. JMM 1998.114.9a

Satin badge with metal and enamel badges, and metallic fringe. “Member, The Royal Sisters Society of Baltimore, Inc.” Gift of Helen Glaser. JMM 1998.114.9a

The Royal Sisters Society of Baltimore was founded in 1937 by Mollie Gresser, Reba Cooper, and several others.  It was a philanthropic group, raising funds for various worthy causes around the city – but it was also a sisterhood, with formal meetings and regulated membership.  The slip of paper announcing this particular member’s name is gone, unfortunately.

JoannaA blog post by Collections Manager Joanna Church. To read more posts by Joanna click HERE.

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