Dear Abby 1.3

Posted on November 21st, 2013 by

Dear Abby gives some solid advice for what to do with the family on Thanksgiving weekend in this installment!

 

Dear Abby,

Because of “Thanksgivvukah”, the entire family is descending on our house for the holiday this year for a whole five days. Don’t get me wrong, I love my family, and I’ll be happy to see them on Thursday, and maybe Friday. But by Sunday, there’s no doubt that our house will be a wreck and my husband and I will be certifiably insane! Please tell me that your museum will be open the Sunday after Thanksgiving and that there will be things to interest all ages! My daugher-in-law doesn’t think this is a good idea because she thinks her kids are too young to learn about the Holocaust. I reminded her that this is not the Holocaust Museum, but she insisted that I write to you to ask—just in case. That’s mechotenem for you, right?

Anyway, it’d be great to know that, any time the family comes for a too-long visit, we have a place to which we can reliably turn for entertainment.

Sincerely,

B-more Bubby Gone Bonkers

 

Dear B-more Bubby,

A Bubby gone bonkers can’t make the batches and batches of latkes that are needed for Chanukkah, and we can’t have that! It’s exactly for that reason that the JMM is always open on the Sunday following Thanksgiving. In fact, it’s usually a special Family Day Sunday, with activities for kids and adults. This year is no different; we will be having a “Civil War Photography Family Day” in honor of our Civil War exhibit. For the kids, we’ll have hands-on activities that will allow them to learn about photographic processes that don’t involve pixels—including making their own stereoscopes to view 3D images! For the adults, there will be a lecture at 1:00pm by Russ Kelbaugh, an expert on early photography and Jewish photographers during the Civil War. To find more information about these and upcoming programs, you can always check out our events calendar online here: http://jewishmuseummd.org/calendar-event/upcoming/.

Just one of the many child friendly activities in our exhibits!

Just one of the many child friendly activities in our exhibits!

Although we don’t have Family Day every day, we do always have activities for all ages. Each of our exhibits—besides being fascinating in and of themselves—contain stations that provide hands-on engagement for children as well as those who want an immersive experience of the exhibits. From listening in on conversations through the ages in “Attman’s Deli”, to understanding the physical evolution of the Lloyd Street Synagogue through movable wooden blocks, to creating your own care package for a wounded Civil War soldier, there are so many ways for people of all ages to learn together and to partake in the Jewish Museum of Maryland experience!

I hope this is enough information to convince your daughter-in-law that it is always a good idea to bring the family to the Jewish Museum of Maryland, no matter the age or occasion!

Yours Truly,

Abby

Have a question of your own for Abby? Click HERE to email her! Make sure to put “Dear Abby” in the subject line! 

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Dear Abby 1.3

Posted on November 21st, 2013 by

The newest installment of “Dear Abby!”

 

Dear Abby,

My wife and I live in the North Pole, but every so often, we take the reindeer down to Baltimore to eat some good crabs and maybe catch a Raven’s game. At our last visit, we saw your brochure at the Visitors’ Center, and we tried to visit your museum. I say tried because we came across two problems. The first was that we couldn’t find a parking space! A sleigh is not exactly a compact vehicle, so street parking was out of the question, and your lot was full. We finally decided to give up and come another time when we saw a large group of schoolchildren walking into the museum. As much as we love children, due to the delicate nature of my occupation, it would simply be disastrous if I visited a museum while large numbers of children were present. We were also worried that the level of noise that generally comes with schoolchildren would startle our reindeer.

I don’t suppose you have any “adult only” hours at the museum?

Signed, Kriss

 

Dear Mr. Kriss,

I’m sorry to hear that you had such a frustrating time trying to visit us! The lot that you saw across the street from us does not actually belong to the museum, unfortunately. That is a city lot, and it does often get filled up during the work week, as you saw. On Sundays, it is much easier to find a spot there, and on the street—which is free on Sundays too. There’s also a garage nearby where you can park. The entrance to the garage is on Baltimore St., just before crossing East St. To make it even better, we have a deal with that garage! The regular price for parking there is $5 for the day, but if you let us know that you parked there, we’ll give you a coupon that takes $2 off of that. You can also find information about parking at the museum on our website, here: http://jewishmuseummd.org/visiting/parking-and-transportation/.

School children discovering the Lloyd Street Synagogue.

School children discovering the Lloyd Street Synagogue.

As for not wanting to share the museum with a school group, that is an understandable dilemna. Schoolchildren can be very exuberant in their quest for knowledge (and in their excitement to be out of the classroom), and while some people might enjoy the energy that those kinds of fellow visitors bring to the museum experience, others might prefer a more peaceful, maybe even zen-like quality. If you (or your reindeer, in this case) are the latter kind of visitor, than I would recommend that you visit on a weekday afternoon. Most of our school groups come in the mornings, and our busiest day, in terms of any type of visitorship, is Sunday.

And don’t forget that, unlike many other museums, we are open on Mondays! You can extend that relaxing weekend feeling by visiting us on a Monday afternoon.

I hope this helped you and that we will be seeing you and the Mrs. very soon!

Yours Truly,

Abby

abby krolik copyHave a question of your own for Abby? Click HERE to email her! Make sure to put “Dear Abby” in the subject line! 

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Dear Abby 1.2

Posted on November 18th, 2013 by

It’s our second installment in the “Dear Abby” series!

Dear Abby,

My long-time friend from New York City—let’s call her “Flo”—is coming to visit, and I really want to show her a good time! I’m always hearing about life in the Big City, so this is my chance to show her that Baltimore has great things too. My very first thought was that the JMM would be the perfect place to take her! Flo volunteers at the Tenement Museum, so I think she’ll really enjoy seeing the synagogues and the exhibits. Flo can also be a bit of a snob when it comes to food—everything, it seems, tastes better in New York. I’d like to have the time to see the museum and also take her to a nice place for lunch. How long does it take to go through the whole museum, and are there any good places to eat that are nearby? Later on, we will meet up with her daughter, “Sarah,” who keeps kosher. Is there a kosher Starbucks nearby where we can meet her?

Sincerely,

“Tired of hearing about the Big Apple”

 

Dear “Tired”,

Your friend probably talks so much about how great New York is because she’s jealous that you get to live in “Charm City.” This visit is your chance to show her a true Baltimore experience, so she can have that memory to take home with her and shout her love for Baltimore from the top of the Empire State Building. You are absolutely correct that the best way to do this is to take her to the JMM!

I would say you should allow yourself about 20-30 minutes in each exhibit—so that’s 60-90 minutes total for all three exhibits. Of course, a lot of it depends on the individual visitor. For example, I’m a compulsive reader, so I drive my friends and family nuts by making them wait for me as I take over an hour to go through one exhibit! However, I’ve seen that most visitor find that 20 minutes is the perfect amount of time to absorb what the exhibit is trying to say without experiencing the dreaded “museum fatigue.” The synagogue tour takes between 45 minutes to an hour—it depends on how many questions you ask the docent! The docents try to aim for 45 minutes, but if you get them started on their favorite topic within Jewish-American history, we can’t be held accountable for how long your tour will take! I can, however, promise that it will be enlightening.

Exploring "Voices of Lombard Street"

Exploring “Voices of Lombard Street”

And, of course, you have to make time for the gift shop! What better way to impress your friend then by showing her the many wonderful things she can buy as a keepsake or as a thoughtful gift for a loved one at our museum shop? All together, I’d allow 2.5 to 3 hours for your visit.

To answer your question about feeding your friend, I will tell you that you are in luck! We happen to be located within easy walking distance of a great number of excellent eateries. Just on the block of Lombard Street that is diagonally across from the museum, there are not one, not two, but three delicatessens—Attman’s, Weiss’s, and Lenny’s—and, if you walk a few blocks south from us on Exeter St. or High St., you will find yourself in the heart of Baltimore’s charming Little Italy (which, I might add, is larger than what is left of NYC’s Little Italy). If you walk a little further south from there, you will enter the trendy Harbor East neighborhood, where there is everything from high quality fast food to fancy, white-cloth restaurants.

As for kosher food, that’s a little more difficult to find in downtown Baltimore. The only kosher restaurant downtown is a cute little café (dairy) called the Van Gough Café. It’s about a half-mile to three-quarters of a mile from the museum, on the corner of Ann St. and—you guessed it—Gough St.

Yours Truly,

Abby

abby krolik copyHave a question of your own for Abby? Click HERE to email her! Make sure to put “Dear Abby” in the subject line! 

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