Performance Counts: July 2014

Posted on July 11th, 2014 by

We’re Gonna Be A Star!

Lights, camera, action!

Lights, camera, action!

Some of you may remember back in December when we introduced our new collateral material (Performance Counts: December 2013), the beautiful folder and brochure designed by Gallagher & Associates. What you may not remember is that this project, generously made possible by the William G. Baker, Jr. Memorial Fund, has a second part! We at the Museum have been hard at work developing a video calling card – that is, we’re putting together a short film (about 6 minutes long) that will serve as an introduction to the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

Why a video? As you know, the Museum has been expanding its development efforts, particularly in the corporate sphere. We feel that a video is the perfect way to capture the attention and hearts of those we hope will support the Museum and its mission. DVDs containing the video can be included with our brochures and folders whenever we put out a grant proposal. Digital copies of the video will be accessible on our website for those seeking to find out more about the Museum. Shorter clips can be shared with media outlets and on our own social media. This video will serve a variety of purposes and give us another tool to engage others with the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

Living History actress Karen Lyons

Living History actress Karen Lyons

Something you might not know: making a video is hard work! We’ve been working with the fantastic team from Blue Land Media and an extraordinary group of volunteers to gather and film the content we need. For our short, 6 minute video we started with over 12 hours of interview footage! This doesn’t include all the “b-roll” that the team shot. (B-roll is all the shots of buildings, landscapes, close ups of objects and exhibits, etc. Basically, all the material that isn’t a shot of someone talking.) We needed to complete all of our filming over two days. This meant a lot of coordination of schedules (we filmed 13 separate interviews, a school visit and multiple synagogue tours), a lot of equipment moving all around the Museum (we filmed in 4 different locations) and a lot of enthusiasm from everyone involved.

And we can’t thank our volunteer interviewees enough. We gathered board members, staff, teachers, museum volunteers and members of our community to tell the story of JMM. Let me tell you: they were wonderful! We couldn’t have asked for a better group of people – their love for the Museum and our neighborhood came shining through.

Past President Barbara Katz

Past President Barbara Katz

Now we’re in the editing phase – that means watching all the footage, identifying the best pieces and trying to reduce that 12+ hours of video by over 120%! We’re very excited by what we’re seeing and we can’t wait to share the finished product with you.

Rachel KThis month’s Performance Counts was written by Development and Marketing Manager Rachel Kassman. To read past editions of Performance Counts, click HERE.

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Performance Counts May 2014: Planning Ahead

Posted on May 16th, 2014 by

In the past few months you have read quite a bit about our current and upcoming exhibits:  Project Mah Jongg, the Electrified Pickle, The A-Mazing Mendes Cohen and Jews, Health and Healing.  We also are preparing for some wonderful events including the 8th Annual Herbert H. and Irma B. Risch program this Sunday, featuring Rabbi Marvin Tokayer and our June 1 Annual Meeting with Dr. Len Saxe.

Yet even as we busily engage in the business of creating, funding and presenting these exciting current projects, we still keep one eye focused on the road ahead.  You will recall that in the fall of 2012 the Board’s ad hoc “Futures Committee” produced a new vision document for the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  The vision reinforced our focus on some of the attributes that make a museum successful, the so-called “four Ds”:  destination, documentation, discourse and discovery.  This vision has guided us in much of what’s been accomplished in the last eighteen months – the doubling of our public hours, the dramatic growth in our attendance, the strengthened relationship with The Associated, our reaccreditation by the American Alliance of Museums and even the painful decisions that have led us to a balanced budget in FY ’14.

This summer we will enter into a second phase of institutional planning.  A new ad hoc “Planning Committee” will be formed with the goal of diving into the next level of the question “What is the Jewish Museum of Maryland?”.  The concept is to build on the work from 2012.  For example, we have made the commitment to focus on becoming a destination – now we’ll ask the question, “what are the distinguishing features of that destination?”.  How are we similar or different from other Jewish museums?  from other Baltimore museums?  How do we make the most of our unique assets?  This stage of planning will be critical as we look ahead to the way we develop our core environment, the historic synagogues and our permanent or signature exhibit.

Simultaneously with this search for “who we are?”, we are launching a second planning process this summer that seeks to answer the question “how do we fit in?”.  This neighborhood vision/plan is being conducted in partnership with The Associated and in conjunction with the Jonestown Planning Council.  As an anchor institution of historic Jonestown, JMM is a key stakeholder in the future development of our community.  The success of the museum is ultimately dependent on what is built around us, not just on what we build.  JMM has contracted with the firm of Mahan Rykiel to serve as our consultant for a planning process that will attempt to understand the needs and interests of current residents and businesses, the downtown Jewish community, and the potential museum audience to craft a compelling vision of what this area might become.  Mahan Rykiel will also work with JMM, The Associated and the community to give some thought to the “branding” of Jonestown and its identity as a great place to live, work, play and visit.

Both planning processes are open to your thoughts.  We will speak to many people over the next few months, but you don’t have to wait for us to call, you can hit the “reply” button to share your ideas.

Marvin Pinkert

This month’s Performance Counts was written by Executive Director Marvin Pinkert. To read more posts by Marvin, click here. To read past issues of Performance Counts, click here.

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JMM Insights May 2014: Project Mah Jongg & Education

Posted on May 9th, 2014 by

Since the successful opening of Project Mah Jongg, The Education and Programs Department has planned some wonderful programming for adults in connection with the exhibit.  We’re particularly excited for our Mother’s Day Mah Jongg Madness event this Sunday and our upcoming “The Art of Mah Jongg” talk with Robert Mintz, chief curator at The Walters Art Gallery on Sunday June 8th.
In addition to our Sunday programs we have been delighted to welcome a charming stream of mah jongg mavens to the Museum. These groups of ladies are coming down to the JMM during our early morning opening hours; often armed with their  own mahj sets and accoutrements for play (if you’re looking for a few mah jongg themed items yourself, don’t worry, our museum shop has got you covered!).  It seems that the ladies are making the JMM a destination for the day (something we highly recommend).  The first order of the day, of course, is visiting our special exhibit Project Mah Jongg; then it’s a leisurely browse through the Museum shop and a visit to the neighborhood for lunch only to head back to the lobby for some intense game play, and then finish up the day taking advantage of the synagogue tours – a full day indeed!

Talmudic Academy 2014

Talmudic Academy 2014

While these lovely ladies are a natural audience for all things mah jongg, the challenge of the exhibit for our department was how to present Project Mah Jongg to school groups? Learning to play mah jongg can be challenging and we couldn’t actually teach a group of students how to play the game in twenty minutes. Mah jongg takes practice to really understand the strategies and even just learning the different symbols on the tiles takes time. We knew we needed to develop an experiential learning opportunity – a way for students to engage and apply academic understandings through hands-on experience, while simultaneously learning new information about the world around them.

Younger students learning at play.

Younger students learning at play.

For inspiration, we turned to the mah jongg handbook. We started by looking for key words that described the game, keeping in mind that students from third to twelfth grade would need to understand.  Success! First we had to familiarize students with the building blocks of the game: the tiles! So we concentrated on the basic symbols – bams, craks, dots and jokers.  Then we tackled math concepts: doubles, triples, quads and quints, consecutive, sequence – a perfect way to fuse classroom learning with the basics of how to win at mah jongg.  From there we developed a hands-on experience where the students could actually play a modified version of the game and apply simple math strategies.  Younger students were given Mah Jongg Mats where players take turns picking tiles, working to complete their mats using the new math concepts that were introduced earlier.  Older students were given a modified card for mah jongg play and used rules similar to the card game “rummy,” using the mah jongg tiles to mimic the different types of hands for play on the “card.” In this way we elevated game playing into an exercise in set theory and critical thinking skills.

Our older students are equally fascinated!

Our older students are equally fascinated!

Project Mah Jongg really pushed us to think creatively with our educational activities and we were nervous – would the students understand?  Would they be engaged and enjoy playing the modified version of the game?  Well, we are excited to report that the students and their teachers have all commented how much fun Mah Jongg is!  Both versions of the game are proving to be popular – most students really seem to enjoy playing with their friends. All of our teacher evaluations have indicated a positive feedback for the exhibits and the engaging learning activities connected to our exhibits.  The teachers for both the younger and older grades have even inquired as to where they can obtain sets to bring back to the classroom!

ileneA blog post by Ilene Dackman-Alon, Education Director. To read more posts from Ilene, click here.

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