Discovery and Recovery:By The Numbers

Posted on January 12th, 2018 by

This month’s edition of Performance Counts comes to us from Deputy Director Tracie Guy-Decker.


For this month’s Performance Counts, it seemed like a good time to take a closer look at our current exhibit, Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.

Performance Counts is all about looking at numbers and data, so I’ll start with the most important number for you to remember about this exhibit: 3. That’s the number of days (including today) you have left to see this important exhibition while it’s at JMM. Monday will be the last day the public will be able to tour the exhibit while it’s here, since National Archives staff will be joining us on Tuesday, to start the de-installation.

Here are some other important numbers and metrics of interest regarding this exhibition:

Exhibition Content

Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage details the dramatic recovery of historic materials relating to the Jewish community in Iraq from a flooded basement in Saddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters, and the National Archives’ ongoing work in support of U.S. Government efforts to preserve these materials–over 2,700 Jewish books and tens of thousands of documents.

In both English and Arabic, the 2,000 square foot exhibit features 23 recovered items and one “behind the scenes” video of the fascinating yet painstaking preservation process. This exhibit was created by the National Archives and Records Administration, with generous support from the U.S. Department of State.

Exhibition Metrics

Since it’s been with us, more than 3,200 visitors have come to JMM to see it. This includes more than 500 students from 18 distinct school visits, including public, independent and religious schools.

While the exhibit has been in our gallery, we’ve been open to the public 62 days (with 2 left after today), and have hosted 10 public programs related to the exhibit (with one more to come this Sunday), and two that didn’t directly relate to the exhibit, but whose participants still had a chance to see it!

While the exhibit has been in our gallery, we’ve been open to the public 62 days (with 2 left after today), and have hosted 10 public programs related to the exhibit (with one more to come this Sunday), and two that didn’t directly relate to the exhibit, but whose participants still had a chance to see it!

Exhibition Logistics

JMM is the eighth venue for this important exhibit, and its installation was made possible here through the generous support of eight donors, including 2 individuals and 6 foundations or philanthropic funds.

The Herbert Bearman Foundation (Lead Sponsor)

Alfred Moses

The David B. Liebman Philanthropic Fund

The Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Fund for the Enrichment of Jewish Education

Middendorf Foundation

John J. Leidy Foundation

Lois and Philip Macht Family Philanthropic Fund

Lowell Glazer

If you miss it here, your next option is to grab a flight to Atlanta ($163) and see it at the Breman Museum ($12)*.  So save some money and take advantage of these last two days.

~Tracie

*If you’re a JMM premium member, you get FREE reciprocal admission to the Breman Museum – and 11 more Jewish museums around the country! Consider upgrading your membership today.

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What’s Hot at JMM?: Museum Matters, January 2018

Posted on January 5th, 2018 by

Image of Ready for Winter

Helen, Ruth, and Martin Weinberg bundle up – they won’t let winter keep them in the house, and neither should you! JMM 1996.127.23.55a

The dropping temperature and bitter winds closed JMM on Thursday, but we’ll be open to visitors again on Sunday.  So don’t give in to the temptation to hibernate! The next 30 days are a great time to make your first visit of 2018.

>Hot tickets

You have just 10 more days to see Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage here in Baltimore (on display through Martin Luther King Day, January 15). Don’t miss our January 14 program with Dr. Henry Green as he describes his efforts to create a permanent record of the last generation of Jews to live in the lands of the Middle East (outside Israel) and North Africa.

>Hot topics

Iraq isn’t the only place where a trove of records of the Jewish community was recently discovered. You read the news stories in October about the Yivo Institute’s new finds in Lithuania. Now you can hear directly from the Institute’s director about the context for understanding this legacy.

>Hot off the presses

We’ve had a last minute addition to our exhibit schedule. At the invitation of the Israeli Embassy we will be presenting Beyond Duty: Diplomats Recognized as Righteous Among the Nations, a panel show on the diplomats recognized as “Among the Righteous of the Nations” by Yad Vashem. The exhibit will open to the public at JMM on February 4, just days after its American premiere on Capitol Hill.

Getting warmer? Details below!

~Marvin


Upcoming programs
All programs take place at the Jewish Museum of Maryland unless otherwise noted. Please contact Trillion Attwood at tattwood@jewishmuseummd.org / 443-873-5177 with any questions or for more information.

JANUARY

Iraqi Jewish Voices

Iraqi Jewish Voices: Narratives of Memory and Identity
Sadie B. Feldman Family Lecture
Sunday, January 14th, 1pm
Speaker: Dr. Henry Green
Included with Museum Admission – Get Tickets Now

Iraqi Jewish Voices tells the story of the last generation of Iraqi Jews displaced in the wake of the Holocaust and the establishment of the State of Israel through dramatic contemporary and historical photography, film, and personal narrative.

Digitized by Smooth Solutions at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York.

YIVO and the Lost Jewish Library of Vilna
Sunday, January 21st, 1pm
Speaker: Jonathan Brent, YIVO Executive Director
Included with Museum Admission – Get Tickets Now

Learn about a collection of 170,000 pages saved from the Nazis and recently found in the basement of a LIthuanian church. The collection includes works by Yiddish novelist Chaim Grande, Sholem Aleichem, and Marc Chagall

Members Only

I Missed My Train
Sunday, January 28th, 3:30pm
Film Screening and Talk with Filmmakers
MEMBERS ONLY – Reserve Your Seats

A special preview screening and behind-the-scenes discussion of the documentary film, I Missed My Train featuring Dutch Holocaust survivor Ernst Van Gelderen on a journey to revisit his experiences as a hidden child during the war.


Over the course of six weeks, our lobby will be transformed into a theatre as we host staged readings, living history dramatic shows, musical performances, movies and author talks that explore a variety of topics and genres – from Yiddish Theatre to punk – and are designed to appeal to visitors of all ages and backgrounds.

FEBRUARY & MARCH

You can view all the programs in the JMM Live! series HERE.


>>View the full JMM calendar of events here.<<


Also of Interest
The JMM is pleased to share our campus with B’nai Israel Congregation. For additional information about B’nai Israel events and services for Shabbat, please visit bnaiisraelcongregation.org.  For more of this month’s events from BIYA, please visit biyabaltimore.org or check out BIYA on Facebook.

Soul to Soul
Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 3:00 pm
Tickets: $26 in advance, $31 at the door
Location: The Gordon Center for the Performing Arts

Zalmen Mlotek, an internationally recognized Yiddish folk music expert and Artistic Director of the National Yiddish Theater-Folksbiene, teams up with Broadway veterans and a klezmer jazz band for this memorable evening. More info.


Esther’s Place

We are constantly getting new and interesting merchandise at Esther’s Place!

This month, our newest arrivals include a series of products featuring our bespoke image of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and new work from acclaimed designer Michael Aram. Stop by and check it out!


Ongoing at the JMM

Exhibits

Exhibits on display include Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage (don’t delay, exhibit closes January 15th!), Voices of Lombard Street: A Century of Change in East Baltimore, and The Synagogue Speaks.

Hours and Tour Times

Combination tours of the 1845 Lloyd Street Synagogue and the 1876 Synagogue Building now home to B’nai Israel are offered: Sunday through Thursday at 11:00am, 1:00pm and 2:00pm.

Click Here for complete hours and tour times


Membership

Make it official! Become a Member of the JMM.
Learn More about membership.
Already ready? Join Here.


Get Involved

The JMM is always looking for volunteers!

Click Here to learn more.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Diving into the Associated Scrapbooks

Posted on December 22nd, 2017 by

This month’s JMM Insights comes from our archivist, Lorie Rombro. You can read more posts by Lorie here.

In the last few months I have begun working on a collection of scrapbooks from The Associated Jewish Charities. The books date back to 1919 and I have been recently investigating the late 1940’s and 1950’s scrapbooks of the publicity and campaign work of the Women’s Division. These books are incredibly interesting, giving a peek into a large, organized group of women working to help not only the Jewish community of Baltimore but people throughout the world. Reading and processing the scrapbooks has been a history lesson of the time period, here and abroad.

Scrapbooks have long been a way to preserve photographs, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, documents, and other assorted items.

The problem with scrapbooks is that they are often put together with materials that are detrimental to long-term preservation. In the past, scrapbook pages where made of poor-quality, highly acidic paper that deteriorates rapidly and discolors. The pages would also become brittle over time and then tear easily and crumble. Often, the binding of the album was not made for the increase in size caused by the materials placed in the scrapbook, causing the spine to break and pages to come out. Papers are attached to the scrapbook with harmful tapes and/or glue. Multi- paged letters or pamphlets may be fastened only by the last sheet, causing rips and tears, or folding and crushing of documents.

For all of these reasons I have been carefully cataloging, photographing and taking apart the scrapbooks. Archivists like me always struggle with the decision whether a scrapbook should stay together or be taken apart. If possible, we try to leave a scrapbook together, since it tells a story not only with the information inside of it but how someone chose to put it together. That is why if I do dismantle a scrapbook, I carefully document its original form for future researchers. To some, these scrapbooks may only seem to contain old bits of paper, but to us they are full of important historical information.

I wanted to share some of what I have found in the scrapbooks. Not only does it give a picture of the time it was made, but some of the pieces could be produced and used today.

The two images above are from the 1949 Women’s Division scrapbook.

We hope you laugh a little at these two postcards that went out to the husbands of the women volunteering! In 1950 over 1200 women participated in the campaign.

This picture is from the 1951 G-day handbook – check out all the do’s and don’t’s they’ve got listed!

Last is my very favorite which I believe could be used today – babies are always a good tug on the heartstrings. These are images from the publicity and booklets for the 1955 Women’s Division campaign.

Making a Scrapbook to Last

Today, making a scrapbook which will stand up to the test of time is easier. Choose a book which is made with acid free paper and pH neutral adhesives for the binding. Use acid free photo corners or other type of binding, make sure all the corners are carefully attached but do not use glue.

In this picture you can see how tape discolors and negatively affects paper.

You want to be able to remove anything placed in a scrapbook, you never know when you might need it again! Scrapbooks are an incredible way to document your family history, a trip, an important event or your organization – they are worth spending a little extra money on good supplies to make sure that future generations can enjoy them.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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