Become an Upstander!


Volunteer Opportunities
in partnership with
Jewish Volunteer Connection


Staying Connected with JMM: Opportunity to Showcase Student Art

Posted on May 21st, 2020 by

We are inviting young Marylanders to participate in an art project for a chance to have their work displayed during our Jews in Space exhibit.

Dear Educators,

Though you’re physically apart, you and your students are still working hard under one sky. Together you can all look up at the stars with wonder, imagination, and dreams. From the Hubble Space Telescope to the NASA Goddard Flight Center, Maryland is home to countless people who have dreamed, and continue to dream, of the wonders of space.

Join JMM this fall as we explore the lives of people who have studied, imagined, and even traveled into the cosmos. Jews in Space: Members of the Tribe in Orbit will share not only the contributions of the Jewish community to space-facing science and culture, but also how Marylanders have impacted space travel, study, and innovation.

In addition to offering engaging field trip experiences (digitally and in-person), we want your students to be a part of the exhibit.

Please share your students’ artwork so that we can highlight how Maryland children imagine space today. Inspired by the Personal Preference Kits packed by astronauts traveling to the International Space Station, we invite your students to ponder traveling to space and creatively respond to the question “What would you bring with you to space?” Your students’ contribution might be featured in our upcoming exhibit!


Share

Share your students’ artwork with us!
Please submit artwork by August 30, 2020.

Mail artwork to:

The Jewish Museum of Maryland
15 Lloyd Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Attn: Paige Woodhouse

Or email photos to Paige at pwoodhouse@jewishmuseummd.org

*Make sure to include your name, age, and list of items (and why) with your artwork.


Find Inspiration 

Encourage Creativity! Students can draw, paint, photograph, or cut and paste their responses to the question “What would you bring to space?” Using this downloadable template, students can work independently, or collaborate with others, to create their artwork.

For inspiration, check out some submissions below:

Tucker, Age 7

Tucker wanted to bring things from his bedroom that would make him feel comfortable. He chose his blanket and pillow, stuffed dog, Spiderman alarm clock, and slippers.

With the help of his mom, Tucker took a photo with his items. He cut and glued shapes to make the sky for his rocketship.

 

Aliceanna, Age 4

Aliceanna chose to bring her favorite noodles, swirly noodles; a beautiful dancing dress because she likes to be fancy; and a glue stick. She also packed her best friend Monsieur Croc and the bear, Aloysius, “to keep Monsieur Croc company.”

She (with a little help from her mom) used glue, construction paper, and crayons.

Azreal, Age 10

“I would want to bring my blanket and my stuffed animal to keep me comfortable. I would bring my camera, diary, and music player.”

Azreal used lot of materials in creating her packing list. She used markers, glitter, yarn, paint, and pencil.


Plan For Next Year!
Jews in Space: Members of the Tribe in Orbit 
Coming this Fall to JMM

This exhibit explores the lives of people who have studied, imagined, and even traveled to the cosmos with an emphasis on the contributions of the Jewish community to those efforts.


For more posts from Paige Woodhouse, click here.

For more education newsletters, click here.


Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Staying Connected with JMM: History is Now

Posted on May 14th, 2020 by

JMM Collects Stories of the Pandemic

Dear Educators,

Take a breath and reflect for a moment. You are an educator teaching and supporting students during a pandemic. History is happening now. You are a part of it and your story is a meaningful one. Have you had a similar conversation with your students recently?

At JMM, we believe in the importance of gathering and preserving personal stories. As a museum, we collect materials related to events, past and present, that impact our communities. This pandemic, which has affected nearly every aspect of daily life, including education, definitely qualifies as one of those events.

We hope that collecting these stories will not only to help the historians of the future understand this moment in time, but also to help people today realize the many different ways the pandemic is affecting our family, classmates, coworkers, neighbors, and ourselves.

We hope you will submit your experiences and stories – through words, images, or objects – to help us preserve our community’s memories and experiences for future generations.


 

History if Now: JMM Collections Stories of the Pandemic

JMM tells the stories of everyday people – that includes you and your students! There’s no pressure to come up with a unique, Pulitzer Prize-worthy tale, we would just love to hear your memories and experiences. From the students you are missing, to what your workspace at home looks like, to what has surprised you the most about living through our current events, your stories are worth telling and sharing.

We’ve come up with a few ideas to get you started that may help your students reflect and foster conversations with them:

What are some differences between learning in a classroom versus learning at home?

How has your school day routine changed?

What do you miss the most about your school?

What do you like the most about learning at home?

What was the most fun you have had since you’ve been home?

You and your students might be inspired to write a poem, journal entry, letter, an essay, or just some scribbled thoughts. Maybe make a recording (on your phone, with a fancy camera, or maybe through your laptop or tablet) or share photos and drawings to illustrate your experiences.

What else can you think of? We can’t wait to see, hear, and share your stories.

Use this form to easily share your stories with us!

You can also mail your stories, photos, offers of objects to us (we love getting mail!). Please do not send actual objects in the mail. Address your mail to:

Joanna Church, Director of Collections & Exhibits
The Jewish Museum of Maryland
15 Lloyd Street
Baltimore, MD 21202.

Or email Joanna at at jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org!

*Make sure to include your name, hometown or location, and age in your email or letter to us, and let us know how you would like us to attribute and share your work – use the questions on the form as guidance.


Storysharing in Practice

An Afternoon of Storyfinding and Storysharing
Sunday, May 31st at 3:30pmWe’re also hosting some events to help you share your stories! Our first confirmed live program is for the youngest in our community — more information and how to register here.

Hannah Salyer Presents PACKS: Strength in Numbers

Virtual Author Visit
Hannah Salyer Presents:
PACKS: Strength in Numbers
Sunday, May 17, 2020 at 3:30pm

We’re thrilled to host author and illustrator Hannah Salyer for this special live stream reading of her book PACKS, an inspiring celebration of how togetherness helps many creatures thrive, including people! Hannah will also lead a drawing demonstration and share about learning from the togetherness we see in the animal kingdom.

Recommended for ages 5 – 9, or any young artist with a love of animals.

Register for this Live Stream Event here!


We want to support the important work that you do in our community. Invite a JMM Educator into your virtual classroom to facilitate a presentation with your students on topics like:

Jewish Immigration to Baltimore through our Voices of Lombard Street exhibit

Environmentalism through our Scrap Yard: Innovators of Recycling exhibit

Holocaust Education in our Holocaust Memory Project

Introduction to Judaism with information about our Lloyd Street Synagogue, the oldest synagogue in Maryland.

To book a virtual visit, complete our Virtual Visit Request Form. 


NASA’s Space Tourism Posters. Credit: https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/resources/682/space-tourism-posters/

Vacation Destination: Pluto
Pluto was once the ninth planet from the sun. It was also the smallest planet in our Solar System. But Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet. Blast off into the future where dwarf planet Pluto is a popular vacation destination!

Looking for other hands-on activities related to space? Check out our Wondernauts website.


For more posts from Paige Woodhouse, click here.

For more education newsletters, click here.


Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Staying Connected with JMM: Teacher Appreciation Week

Posted on May 7th, 2020 by

JMM loves educators!

Dear Educators,

You play a pivotal role in young people’s lives. Your work with youth fosters a love for learning, inspires curiosity, builds empathy, and facilitates the long-term success of your students. During teacher appreciation week we want to pause and thank you for all that you do. JMM’s Director of Education, Ilene, shared a special thanks here.

The month of May is Jewish American Heritage Month and we are here to help you and your students to learn about and celebrate Jewish contributions to American culture, history, innovation, and more.

We want to support the important work that you do in our community. Invite a JMM Educator into your virtual classroom to facilitate a presentation with your students on topics like Jewish immigration to Baltimore.

To book a virtual visit, complete our Virtual Visit Request Form. 

If you have thoughts on more ways we can support you, please reach out at any time!


Online Resources 

American Jewish women matching card game.

Explore this activity package our program team put together that celebrates Jewish American women’s history, featuring stories of women from the 1800s and 1900s.

Image from The Synagogue Speaks, Jewish Museum of Maryland

Explore our online resources on the Education Programs page of our website.

Make sure to check out our recent additions:

The Synagogue Speaks Digital Book 
This original JMM book is a great way to introduce students to Baltimore’s historic Jewish community. Our Introduction to Judaism Educator’s Guide includes an accompanying activity.

The A-Mazing Mendes Cohen
Mendes Cohen was born in Richmond in 1796, moved to Baltimore with his family when he was 12 years old, and died at age 84 in 1879. As students explore this website, they will learn about the world of Mendes Cohen, meet Mendes’ family and join him in many adventures. Educator resources here. 

The Holocaust Memory Project
The 91 stories presented here put human faces on one of the most tragic chapters in modern history, the Holocaust. Each post is dedicated to a single story that has been told through the medium of collage. Educator resources here.


While a space probe may not have a human pilot, it takes a whole team of people to make one!

While a space probe may not have a human pilot, it takes a whole team of people to make one! This Wondernauts activity of building a space probe is a great one to share with families looking for something to do together.

Looking for other hands-on activities related to space? Check out our Wondernauts website.


For more posts from Paige Woodhouse, School Program Coordinator, click here.

For more education newsletters, click here.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Next Page »