December Education Highlights

Posted on December 25th, 2015 by

At a quick glance looking at the December school group numbers, the education department was busy engaging with over 550 students (Pre K-Grade 11) from 15 schools throughout the area that took advantage of JMM education programs on site as well as outreach programs.  These students came from Jewish, Catholic and public schools from Frederick County, Harford County, Baltimore County and Baltimore City.

At the beginning of the month, eighth graders from Windsor Hills Middle School (one of the JMM’s museum/school partnership schools) came to the JMM to participate in activities relating to Paul Simon: Words and Music.  The students also helped us pilot a new education program that we recently developed looking at injustices (women’s rights, housing, slavery, civil rights, anti-Semitism etc.)  that have occurred throughout our history.  The students were so engaged in the archival exploration activity and used great critical skills in trying to understand the images and documents.  They enjoyed sharing their finding with their classmates.

A beautifully decorated bulletin board!

A beautifully decorated bulletin board!

The education department went to Matthew A. Henson Elementary School and celebrated the holiday of Hanukkah with over 60 preschoolers.   We were delighted to see the lovely Hanukkah bulletin board in the hallway outside of the classrooms.   The children loved learning about miracle of Hanukkah through puppets and also learned how to spin dreidels.  The students honed their one to one correspondence skills by matching the Hebrew letter on the dreidel to the work mat made by our education department.  The children also loved learning how to play Hanukkah dominoes and matching symbols of the holiday.

Learning the dreidel

Learning the dreidel

Last week, over 55 kindergartners from Highlandtown Elementary School visited the JMM in connection with their study of World Cultures and celebrations.  Students learned about the life of Ida Rehr and the Preschool Immigrant’s Trunk program.  Students loved learning about Ida’s brave voyage to ‘The Golden Land” and spent time role playing how Ida might have lived on Lombard Street during the 1920’s in the Voices of Lombard Street exhibit.  The students also loved exploring the Lloyd Street Synagogue.

Yesterday, students and parents from Bolton Street Synagogue kicked off the My Family Story project that is generously funded by the Hilda & Jacob Blaustein Enrichment Fund for Jewish Education.  My Family Story offers an opportunity for students and their families to delve into their family history and create an art installation that represented their family ancestry.  This year students and their families are participating in the My Family Story project from three local congregational schools, Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Beit Tikvah Congregation and Bolton Street Synagogue.  Bolton Street students and their families gathered and enjoyed an Immigrant’s Trunk performance with Ida Rehr.  We are looking forward to seeing all of the projects that are being made in connection with the My Family Story project later this spring in April.

 

We look forward to working with students from area school after school resumes after New Year’s!

ileneA blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more posts by Ilene click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Once Upon a Time…04.03.2015

Posted on December 22nd, 2015 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Joanna Church at 410.732.6400 x236 or email jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org

 

1992142008Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  April 3, 2015

PastPerfect Accession #:  1992.142.008

Status:  Beth Tfiloh High School class of 1990: The class was fully identified by two classmates. Top row, l to r: Adam Spector, Jason Broth, Abe Finkelstein, Robby Lowenstein, David Mitnick, Josh Karlip, Erik Bleich, Josh Blass, Ezra Lightman, Adam Cohen, Joel Rubenstein. front row l to r: Ruth Rotenberg, Nina Sznajderman, Alicia Katznelson, Batsheva Genut, Dee Dee Macklin, Denise Tanhoff, Liza Hutter, Rhonda Schnitzer, Tanya Bunich, Sharon Fischer, Sherry Ershler.  (originally ID’d, and published in the JT, as 1992, many respondents noted the correct date of 1990.)

Special Thanks To: Linda Crusoe, Helen Mashbaum, Searle Mitnick, Layne Lowenstein, Adam Cohen

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Celebrate Arts Education

Posted on September 17th, 2015 by

Did you know that this week marks the fifth anniversary of National Arts Education Week? This is something that I recently learned by reading the weekly update of the area arts and culture scene distributed by the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.  Study after study highlights the importance of exposing children of all ages to the arts in all its many forms. Local families and schools are fortunate to have access to such an incredible variety of museums where the arts come to life in such dynamic ways.

Given this important anniversary, I thought I’d take the opportunity to promote the JMM’s educational programs and resources and to highlight how they foster multidisciplinary connections between social studies, English language arts and fine arts.  While the JMM is traditionally thought of as a history museum, our education team is exceptionally talented at using our exhibits, collections and historic sites as springboards for activities and resources that integrate the arts.

City Spring students participate in a field trip to the JMM.

City Spring students participate in a field trip to the JMM.

This summer, JMM docent Robyn Hughes created an art program for campers with visual impairments from the Maryland School for the Blind in which students toured Voices of Lombard Street and then built neighborhoods out of art supplies.

This summer, JMM docent Robyn Hughes created an art program for campers with visual impairments from the Maryland School for the Blind in which students toured Voices of Lombard Street and then built neighborhoods out of art supplies.

A good example of this is our Immigrant’s Trunk program that explores immigration history through the lens of personal stories. Each of our Immigrant’s Trunk program brings the experience of a real life Jewish immigrant to life through reproduced photographs, documents and objects. The trunks come with a full set of lesson plans that integrate primary source analysis as well as creative writing assignments, storytelling and art activities. Teachers can also opt to schedule living history performances by professional actors who dramatize significant moments from each immigrant’s life.

Actor Terry Nicholetti brings to life the story of Bessie Bluefeld, a Russian immigrant who established Baltimore’s beloved Bluefeld’s catering business.

Actor Terry Nicholetti brings to life the story of Bessie Bluefeld, a Russian immigrant who established Baltimore’s beloved Bluefeld’s catering business.

Some of our programs have strong visual arts components, including a new initiative that encourages middle school students to interpret family history through multimedia art installations. Last year, JMM education director Ilene Dackman-Alon piloted My Family History Project through a partnership with Beit Hatfutsot in Tel Aviv and the Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School in Baltimore. As part of the program, students immersed themselves in genealogical research. They then went above and beyond the traditional family tree assignment by creating amazing visual representations of some aspect of their family’s experiences. The student artwork was displayed in the JMM as we hosted an evening reception for families. Everyone was amazed by the creativity and diversity of the artwork on display and how the students incorporated a variety of media as they highlighted something unique about their own family’s history. We are delighted to embark on the second year of this project and Ilene is expanding the initiative to work with additional schools.

An example of the art work on display in the My Family History Project.

An example of the art work on display in the My Family History Project.

Another piece of art created for the My Family History Project.

Another piece of art created for the My Family History Project.

Visual arts, drama, creative writing, storytelling…these are all art forms that can easily be integrated into JMM educational resources. The one medium that has not been as easy to incorporate is music, but I am excited to announce an exciting new educational offering this fall in conjunction with the opening of Paul Simon: Words and Music (on display October 11, 2015-January 18, 2016). Our education team has developed a curriculum that ties in with music education standards and exposes students to the worlds of music theory and the history of folk music. For all the educators out there, this is an opportunity not to be missed. Field trips can be scheduled by emailing our visitor services coordinator, Graham Humphrey at ghumphrey@jewishmuseummd.org.

Click here for more information about these and other JMM educational programs.

So take advantage of the wealth of cultural resources available locally and find time to visit a nearby museum. You’ll be glad you did!

deborahA blog post by Deputy Director Deborah Cardin. To read more posts from Deborah click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Next Page »