Once Upon a Time…

Posted on November 19th, 2013 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Jobi Zink, Senior Collections Manager and Registrar at 410.732.6400 x226 or jzink@jewishmuseummd.org.

 

2009040076Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  This photo actually wasn’t run in the JT! It was helpfully identified when someone saw it on our website!

PastPerfect Accession #:  2009.040.076

Status:  Mingling at the Baltimore Hebrew College commencement exercises, 1975.

Left to Right:  Unidentified woman, Dr. George Berlin, Mr. Aaron Leibtag, Rabbi Levi Smolar, and Dr. Barry Gittlen

Special Thanks To: Susan Liebtag

 

 

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Student Visits to the JMM!

Posted on October 28th, 2013 by

This week, the Jewish Museum of Maryland welcomed students from Mount Washington Middle School and the Jewish Community Center to visit our exhibitions and synagogue.

6th grade students learning about the historic Lloyd Street Synagogue (Photo courtesy of Mr. Kaiser).

6th grade students learning about the historic Lloyd Street Synagogue (Photo courtesy of Mr. Kaiser).

On Monday, students from the 6th grade class at Mt Washington Middle School, along with their wonderful teacher Mr.Kaiser, learned about the American Civil War, American immigration history from here in Baltimore, and toured the Lloyd Street synagogue, the oldest synagogue in our entire state.

While in our new exhibition “Passages Through the Fire: Jews and the Civil War,” the students saw a glimpse of the war that most had not seen, the role of Jewish people in the Civil War. Here the students participated in two hands-on learning activities. First, students read a letter written by a girl to her father who was off in the war and then the students wrote a similar letter of their own. Second, the 6th graders created their own civil war monument just like the many monuments that can be found at battlefields across the country.

Next, the students learned more about the life of a Jewish immigrant right here in Baltimore, Maryland in the Voices of Lombard Street exhibition. While making their way through the exhibition, the students participated in a scavenger hunt to enhance the tour.

Finally, the 6th grade took a tour of the Lloyd Street synagogue, the oldest synagogue in the state of Maryland and the third oldest synagogue in the entire country. On their tour, the students learned about the essential parts of a synagogue, the history of the building, and hidden aspects of the building that have been revealed through archeological work. To go along with the tour, the students participated in an archeological activity in which they did a mock excavation to find artifacts that are in the museum’s collection.

For more information on the 6th grade’s visit to the museum, head over to Mr. Kaiser’s blog.

Searching through the Voices of Lombard Street exhibition while on a scavenger hunt (Photo courtesy of Mr. Kaiser).

Searching through the Voices of Lombard Street exhibition while on a scavenger hunt (Photo courtesy of Mr. Kaiser).

Gettysburg might have over 1200 monuments and markers, but its got nothing on this one made by Mount Washington Middle (Photo courtesy of Mr. Kaiser).

Gettysburg might have over 1200 monuments and markers, but its got nothing on this one made by Mount Washington Middle (Photo courtesy of Mr. Kaiser).

Smile and say "Synagogue!"

Smile and say “Synagogue!”

On Wednesday, kindergartners from the Jewish Community Center (JCC) came to learn about immigration here in Baltimore and tour the historic Lloyd Street synagogue

First, the students toured the upstairs of the synagogue and participated in a scavenger hunt activity. Next, the students went downstairs to the Synagogue Speaks exhibition to learn more about the history of the building and participate in hands-on learning activities. The kindergartners built a new synagogue of out blocks, modified the Star of David stained glass window that can be found in the synagogue, and used matching cards to learn more about Jewish religious objects.

After their tour of the synagogue, the students explored the Voices of Lombard Street exhibition to learn more about life of Jewish immigrants here in Baltimore, Maryland. In the exhibit, the kindergartners played dress up with historic clothes and partook in another scavenger hunt.

Students viewing a copy of the Torah.

Students viewing a copy of the Torah.

Redesigning a new version of the Lloyd Street Synagogue out of blocks.

Redesigning a new version of the Lloyd Street Synagogue out of blocks.

Students making their own version of the Star of David stained glass window found in the upstairs of the synagogue.

Students making their own version of the Star of David stained glass window found in the upstairs of the synagogue.

Looking into the chicken cage in the market section of Voices of Lombard Street.

Looking into the chicken cage in the market section of Voices of Lombard Street.

Both groups of students seemed to have a great time exploring and learning at the museum this week. It was truly a pleasure to have both groups at the museum and we can’t wait for them to come back again soon!

A blog post by fall education intern Andrew Hallman. To read more posts by interns, click here.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Another Farewell to Zap! Pow! Bam!

Posted on August 26th, 2013 by

Baltimore Hebrew Day School 03.12 (2)

Getting a little reading in at the exhibit.

There are many times that the development and education departments work together to write grant proposals to seek funding for various education initiatives.   As a thank you to the funder, we usually write a final report detailing how many students came to the Museum, and where the students resided in the state of Maryland.   We also like to report about the educational activities that students participated in.  In addition, to these statistics we like to include the comments that teachers included in their evaluation of their field trip experience.

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Going onto the moving truck.

Last weekend, we said goodbye to Zap, Pow, Bam- The Superhero: The Golden Age of Comic Books, 1938-1950.  It struck me as I was culling through the evaluations of  Zap, Pow, Bam, that the comments were very interesting- and they surely would provide good fodder for a blog post.

  • “I really liked the set-up of the Superhero exhibit.  It was very spacious and neatly organized.  The students seemed very interested to learn that Superman had parents, the names of the various comic book publishers.”  It was also important for them to learn that by achieving greatness- you also have great responsibilities.”  The students also love seeing the artifacts.
  • “The students really like the diversity of the exhibits, and the hands-on learning they were able to do.
  • “Fascinating, new information!  Great connections between pop culture and history to Judaism.”
  • “They enjoyed discovering new comic heroes. The references to Hitler and WWII were perfect this is what the students are studying now in middle school.”  (pix of students by wall)
  • “It was a wonderful experience, all of the hands-on learning activities and the wealth of knowledge from the guides.”  (pix of students with masks drawing)
  • “It’s important for students to learn about all cultures.  The Museum gives them a unique perspective, and helps the students to recognize the differences as well as the similarities to their own cultures.
  • “Our second graders just finished studying Helen Keller, so seeing the Braille comic book – AMAZING! “  (girl reading reading comic book)
A school group enjoys our hands-on "artist studio."

A school group enjoys our hands-on “artist studio.”

It is wonderful that teachers recognize the Museum as a place for active learning and engagement.  We look forward to reading more informative notes from teachers in the next few months with the opening of our next exhibition, Passages Through the Fire: Jews and the Civil War which opens on October 13, 2013.

Young gentlemen from the Charles E. Smith Jewish Day school enjoy the displays.

Young gentlemen from the Charles E. Smith Jewish Day school enjoy the displays.

ileneA blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more post by Ilene, click here.

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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