This chicken soup is definitely bigger than a breadbox!

Posted on March 9th, 2016 by

When Beyond Chicken Soup: Jews and Medicine in America opens, I will have been with the Museum for 10 months and three weeks.

I started on the day of the April board meeting last year, and even on that, my very first day, I was already hearing about this amazing health exhibit we had coming. I learned quickly that we’d won two prestigious and competitive grants from the Federal government; that the fundraising goals and achievements for the exhibit had blown all previous records out of the water; that we’d been working on this ambitious project already for nearly three years.

When we say immersive environments, we really mean it!

When we say immersive environments, we really mean it!

Fast forward several months, and I was delighted to accept the challenge when Marvin and Deborah asked if I’d take the baton from Deborah as project manager once we transitioned into the fabrication stage of the project.

I had no idea what I was getting into!

I have considerable experience project managing the creation of physical deliverables, but the largest deliverable I’ve ever managed was about the size of a magazine.

Yup, that's a REAL ambulance (well, the back of one anyway).

Yup, that’s a REAL ambulance (well, the back of one anyway).

Beyond Chicken Soup boasts the last five inches of an ambulance, an almost-full-sized pharmacy entrance, and recreated gymnastic wall bars, just to name three bigger-than-a-breadbox deliverables. It has literally hundreds of components that had to be designed and printed or configured and programmed or fabricated and painted. And that doesn’t even account for all of the artifacts!

This really is a remarkably ambitious undertaking. It forced me to stretch my project-management muscles, and required the assistance of the extended Museum team, from my colleagues on staff to our partners at The Associated to our wonderful vendors, too numerous to mention.

Anyone have these in their childhood school gyms?

Anyone have these in their childhood school gyms?

I really enjoy project management. I find it remarkably satisfying to look at a finished project and say “I helped make that happen.” That satisfaction is immeasurably more intense when that final product is interesting, smart, funny, or in some way arresting. Lucky for all of us, Beyond Chicken Soup is all those things and more. It tells a fascinating story that resonates with issues that remain key issues in American culture. I am gratified to no end to see this huge undertaking—one I’ve been imagining since my first day on the job—coming together in this last week before the opening.

Make sure to take (and share!) your own #ChickenSoupSelfie when you visit.

Make sure to take (and share!) your own #ChickenSoupSelfie when you visit.

I hope you’ll join us this weekend to see for yourself!

Tracie Guy-DeckerA blog post by Associate Director Tracie Guy-Decker. Read more posts from Tracie by clicking HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Stepping Back in Time

Posted on February 24th, 2016 by

Walking into the Krieger Schechter Day School on a dreary and snowy February day, my colleagues Trillion, Joanna and I felt as though we had traveled back in time. Students wearing poodle skirts and letter jackets roamed the halls and the sounds of rock and roll played in the background. We had come to participate in the middle school’s Learning Festival, a three-day break from normal academics when the entire student body immerses itself in the study of a specific theme through speakers, field trips and a variety of hands-on activities. This year’s theme, “The 1950s: From Prosperity to Protest”, was an especially rich topic, one that was clearly embraced by students and teachers alike.

The JMM was thrilled to be invited to participate. To help shed light on an important 1950s trend, suburbanization, we installed our traveling exhibition, Jews on the Move, which examines the history of the move of Baltimore’s Jewish community from the city to the suburbs from 1945-68. The exhibition was on view for two weeks in a hallway near Chizuk Amuno’s sanctuary where it was enjoyed by both the school community as well as by synagogue congregants.

Jews on the Move was developed as a collaborative project with The Program in Museums and Society at the Johns Hopkins University. It was originally installed in 2012 at the Johns Hopkins University. It has since been featured at many additional venues including the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Library and several synagogues.

Jews on the Move was developed as a collaborative project with The Program in Museums and Society at the Johns Hopkins University. It was originally installed in 2012 at the Johns Hopkins University. It has since been featured at many additional venues including the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Library and several synagogues.

In addition to having the exhibit on view, Trillion and I led two workshops for students during which they had an opportunity to look for photos and stories in the exhibit (bonus points for finding a 1960s photo of Chizuk Amuno!).

Students viewing the exhibit.

Students viewing the exhibit.

Students viewing the exhibit.

Students viewing the exhibit.

They then worked together in groups to review 1950s era advertisements from real estate companies that ran in the Jewish Times that tried to entice suburban home buyers. Students were asked to identify what features were highlighted to appeal to potential buyers (spacious floor plans, new and modern appliances, yards, etc) and how the use of images and typography helped make the case.

Ads like this one from the Jewish Times in 1960 appealed to families looking to move out of crowded homes in the city.

Ads like this one from the Jewish Times in 1960 appealed to families looking to move out of crowded homes in the city.

After they had analyzed their photos, students then designed their own ad for a 1950s-era suburban development that they shared with classmates.  We loved the enthusiasm with which the students tackled this assignment and were even treated to an advertising jingle and dance by one of the groups.

deborahA blog post by Deputy Director Deborah Cardin. To read more posts from Deborah click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Transforming the Gallery

Posted on February 22nd, 2016 by

In its natural state, the Feldman Gallery is a nice big open space, with high walls and a wide expanse of floor – but of course the point of an exhibit gallery is to show off the contents, not admire the walls, and every exhibition fills the room a little differently.  With each exhibit we get used to that particular configuration, the feel of the space, the color scheme and the visual focal points: The gallery looks like this. Then that exhibit closes and the cases and temporary walls are removed, and we think, “Oh, wow! What a nice big open space!”

Joanna Church taking down a poster in the gallery.

Deinstalling Cinema Judaica, fall 2015. So much space!

Soon enough, though, it’s time to put up the next exhibit.  The gallery’s open floor plan is versatile, but almost always requires some additional structures to create more vertical space. In the case of our upcoming Beyond Chicken Soup: Jews and Medicine in America exhibition (opening March 13), we need a LOT of additional vertical space.  Thanks to the exhibit fabrication team at Precision Plastics, the Feldman Gallery is being transformed into a series of small galleries, each custom-designed to highlight a particular aspect of the exhibit’s theme through images, documents, and a variety of artifacts. And every day, at least one staff member sneaks into the room (careful not to disturb the people doing the work) to admire the progress.

Framing out the new walls.

Framing out the new walls.

Plywood and drywall - these walls mean business.

Plywood and drywall – these walls mean business.

Some finishing touches: baseboards and paint.

Some finishing touches: baseboards and paint.

Not all the walls are purely functional; here’s the pharmacy window, almost finished (with the movie screen from Paul Simon: Words and Music behind it, waiting to be painted).

Not all the walls are purely functional; here’s the pharmacy window, almost finished (with the movie screen from Paul Simon: Words and Music behind it, waiting to be painted).

The view from the top. Goodbye, one-giant-room: Welcome Beyond Chicken Soup!

The view from the top. Goodbye, one-giant-room: Welcome Beyond Chicken Soup!

Once the walls are ready, it’ll be time for the installation of cases, furniture, and graphics – and then my favorite part, the artifacts.  Then the transformation of the Feldman Gallery will be complete!

JoannaA blog post by Collections Manager Joanna Church. To read more posts by Joanna click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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