A Family Adventure to Queens

Posted on August 31st, 2012 by

A blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon.

This time of year always seems so bittersweet for me with the end of summer upon us, the kids going back to school.  The specific date of August 29th has so many meanings for me….. this year would be my mom, Barbara Sue Levy Dackman’s 83rdbirthday.  It was also the day 7 years ago when Hurricane Katrina devastated the city of New Orleans; which coincided with the first day that I started to work at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

My employment at the JMM was not something that I had intended…My connection with the JMM seven  years ago was only that I had made an appointment to meet with the JMM’s family historian, Dr. Deborah Weiner of the Robert L. Weinberg Family History Center to help me in my search for my own family’s past.  My father was always fascinated with his own family genealogy and was quite proud that his father, Zelig Dachmann travelled alone at age 20, to Baltimore from Dvinsk, Latvia on the Munchen, a ship that was a part of the Bremen Lines and arrived in Baltimore in March,  1899. I was delighted that I able to get a copy of the ship’s manifest from the JMM and show it to my father.

I was amazed by the breadth of information that was available for researchers at the Family History Center.  Researchers have access to Baltimore City directories dating from 1752-1963; US census records for Baltimore from 1900-1930; passenger manifests of ships that arrived in the Port of Baltimore; records of Jewish cemeteries in the Greater Baltimore  area; along with the communal records of birth,  circumcisions, marriages and death and so much more…….   I felt like a kid in a candy store- and also thought that I could spend so much time here at the JMM trying to really document my own family’s journey to Baltimore.

Fast forward -Seven years have passed since my first introduction to the Jewish Museum of Maryland and I am sad to say that I have not finished researching all that there is -but every once in awhile something reminds to go back and delve deeper into my own family’s roots.

There are places outside the JMM where you can do research from the confines of your home.  The website of Jewish-Gen which is an affiliate of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York offers access into many databases all over the world.  I was able to locate the surname of Dachmann from Dvinsk and I found the names of my own paternal great grandfather-Jankel Mowscha and his father-Simon Dachmann.  I also noted that Simon had a brother Mordechai.

The internet has really allowed us to have such an easy access to information and I decided to “google” my last name (maiden name)-and I discovered that there were  many people with  names are quite similar to mine, and I started to contact each one…..

Ilene Dackman and Barbara Dachman.

Last weekend-I had the opportunity to meet one of the descendants of Mordechai  Dachmann-my great-great grandfather’s brother.   I met  Barbara Mae Dachman (a similar name to my mother) who grew up in Queens, New York and has lived in Puerto Rico over the past 25 years.  Barbara was here in the US visiting her mom and sister Ileen (so weird that there are two Ilene Dackman/Dachman walking around on this planet).

Ilene and Barbara on the boardwalk – Far Rockaway Beach, Queens, NY.

I travelled to NYC and hopped on the A train to Far Rockaway Beach in Queens.  We had such a delightful visit-one of those moments that you take with you and just smile…..   I found Barbara to be a lovely person-her mom Lorraine was able to give us both an insight to Barbara’s father, Seymour and life living with Barbara’s paternal grandfather  – Samuel Dachman, who was the only son of Mordechai Dachmann-and the nephew to my great-great grandfather, Simon Dachmann. Our visit only lasted for two hours- but I am so grateful to have had this opportunity to meet a new relative- but I also think that I have also made a life-long friend.

Ilene, Lorraine Dachman (Barbara’s mom) and Barbara.

I encourage you to visit the Robert L. Weinberg  Family Research Center-it is so fascinating to touch documents from the past that bear the names of relatives that have lived before us… All of us have an immigration story-past and present. The JMM is a great place to start on your own family adventure.

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MS 203 Borden Family Collection

Posted on June 21st, 2012 by

Borden Family Collection

n.d, 1895-1953

 MS 203

The Jewish Museum of Maryland

ACCESION AND PROVENANCE

The Borden Family Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Neal Borden in 2009 as accession 2009.051.  Jennifer Vess processed the collection in March 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Ketubah for Nathan Bordensky and Sadie Nachlas Bordensky, June 29, 1911. 2009.51.20

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Nathan Bordensky (also spelled Bordenski) was born July 15, 1885 (or possibly 1887) in Eastern Europe (possibly Polandor, Ukraine).  He graduated from the Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons (later merged with the University of Maryland Medical School) in 1907.  Bordensky practiced in southwest Baltimore at offices on Pulaski Highway and Wilkens Ave. In 1911 he married Sadie Nachlas, born in Maryland in July 1893.  Their oldest son, Melvin was born June 16, 1913 and a second son, Jesse, followed about three years later.  Nathan died in 1926.  After he died the family changed the name from Bordesnky to Borden and for a time lived with Sadie's mother, Rose.  Sadie died in 1976.

Sadie’s father Harris Nachlas (born 1867) and mother Rose (born c. 1877) immigrated to the United States from Russia some time before October of 1892.  Harris and Rose had several children and Sadie may have been the oldest.

Melvin Borden married Edith Silberg (born c. 1915), the daughter of Abraham Silberg (a tailor born c. 1884 in Russia) and Lena Silver Silberg (born c. 1888 inRussia).  Melvin became a doctor and the couple had two sons Neal D. Borden and John S. Borden.  Melvin served in the military during World War II.  He died in 1984 and Edith died in 2003.

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Sources: Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929 – http:///www.mdhistoryonline.net/mdmedicine/index.cfm?action=search; US Census 1900-1930

Melvin N. Borden seated at a desk during World War II. 2009.51.14

Uniform jacket worn by Melvin Borden during World War II. 2009.51.8a

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The Borden Family Collection consists of documents, photographs and objects related to multiple generations and branches of the Borden family.  The archival collection consists of certificates, diplomas, books, booklets, etc. related to Harris Nachlas, Nathan Bordensky, Sadie Nachlas Bordensky (Borden), Melvin Borden, and Edith Silberg Borden.  The documents are organized chronologically.
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Melvin N. Borden after he retired from being a doctor. 2009.51.15

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MS 90 Reverend Hersz F. Kinek Circumcision Records, 1940-1967

Posted on June 7th, 2012 by

A few weeks ago I posted the finding aid for one of our midwife records collections.  Midwife records can provide a wealth of information for genealogists and historians.  The following finding aid is for another type of collection that also helps genealogists reconstruct the story of their ancestors – circumcision records. 

Reverend Hersz F. Kinek (1900-1976)

Circumcision Records, 1940-1967

MS 90

  The Jewish Museum of Maryland

Rabbi Hersz F. Kinek lighting the candles for Channukah on the bima at Congregation Beth Hamedrosh Hagadol, Dec. 14, 1947. 1989.2.2

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Board of Jewish Education Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Isaac Kinek in 1990 as accession 1990.50. The collection was processed in Spring 2002 by Ed Schechter and Myrna Siegel.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Bris dress worn by Joseph Kornblatt, c. 1904. Anna Osnot Smotrisky Kornblatt made the gown from her wedding dress train. 1987.130.24

HISTORICAL NOTE

Hersz Kinek was born in Lodz, Poland in 1900.  He lived in Belgium, Switzerland and Austria(where he learned to perform ritual circumcisions) before moving to Milan, Italyto accept a cantorial position with the Tempio Israeletico congregation. The Tempio awarded Kinek a life contract, and he resided there for 15 years. When Mousollini forced all Jews in Italyin 1938 to register as Jews, Kinek prepared his family to leave.  He applied for a visa to Palestine, but was denied entry by the governing British. With the help of an American relative Kinek sent an affadavit and was granted permission to come to the United States.  Kinek and his family were aboard a U.S.-bound ship when World War II broke out in September 1939. 

In Baltimore, Kinek became the cantor of Bais Hamedrash Hagodol Congregation, located then at the corner of Baltimore and Chester streets.  The Kineks moved from East Baltimore to Forest Park, and then to upper Park Heights Avenue, and Reverend Kinek served as the cantor for Shaarei Zion Congregation for approximately ten years before moving to Bnai Brak, Israel, in 1967. Kinek served as Baltimore’s leading mohel (ritual circumciser) during the years he lived there, performing the ceremony on thousands of children.

Circumcision set. 1998.109.1

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The collection contains record books and forms of circumcisions performed by Reverand Kinek for 1940 through 1967.  The records from 1940 until April 12, 1951 are organized chronologically.  Records from April 12, 1951 are organized in reverse chronological order.  Records may contain the following pieces of information: name of the child in English and Hebrew/Yiddish; date of birth; date of circumcision; place of circumcision; name of father; name of mother; address of parents; telephone number.

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