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National Chocolate Ice Cream Day

Posted on June 8th, 2020 by

Blog post by JMM archivist Lorie Rombro. You can read more posts by Lorie HERE.


For the last few years part of my family’s summer routine is celebrating National Food Days, I wanted to make sure that my children had something they associated with summer stay the same this year. It was a beautiful weekend and school ended on Friday, so we decided to start celebrating this weekend, June 7th, which was National Chocolate Ice Cream Day!

Mack Sennett girls promoting Hendler’s Ice Cream, 1919; JMM 1996.148.7.

We headed out to Glen Arm, Maryland to the Prigel Family Creamery (closed on Sundays, so plan in advance), where you can watch the cows while ordering your ice cream. We bought three pints of chocolate and chocolate flavored ice cream and yesterday we had a chocolate ice cream feast out on the back porch. In celebration of summer and ice cream I looked through the collection to share some images from the past with you.

Herbert and Leny Glushakow eating ice cream, c. 1930; JMM 1996.56.9.

Reuben Kramer and unidentified woman eating ice cream on pier, c. 1931-1933; JMM 1994.89.144.

Hendlers Ice Cream truck, 1941; JMM 1995.87.1.

Hendler family and/or the Hendler Creamy, during the ice cream centennial, 1951; JMM 1996.152.26.

“June 7, 1951 Baltimore, Joseph Held, aged 2, (great great grandnephew of Jacob Fussell) who refused to leave Mayor D’Alesandro’s office until he had eaten all of this ice cream;” JMM 1996.152.64.


 

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HENDLERS: The Velvet Kind, An Image Gallery Part 3

Posted on August 13th, 2018 by

Article by Rachel Kassman. Originally published in Generations 2011 – 2012: Jewish Foodways.  Information on how to purchase your own copy here. 


Flavors of the Month!

Vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry were big business for Hendler Creamery, but that didn’t stop them from experimenting! When Chase and Sanborn introduced the concept of dated coffee, Hendler Creamery  gained permission to use the phrase and invented a whole new flavor of ice cream – coffee with dates!  The company also made specialty flavors for particular customers, like ginger and peppermint for Hutzler’s department store and tomato sherbet for the Southern Hotel. But perhaps the best remembered specialty flavor was Hendler’s Egg-Nog ice cream. Hendler’s was the only ice cream company in the United States to have a liquor license (for blending liquor into ice cream) so that the Egg-Nog ice cream could be flavored with pure rum.

A calendar of monthly flavor specialties, provide by Hendler’s to various ice cream vendors.

Anonymous Gift. 1998.47.

This billboard shares Hendler’s preferred recipe for a holiday egg nog! Anonymous Gift, 1998.47.13.17.

Christmas Charity

December wasn’t just a month for Egg-Nog ice cream. L. Manuel Hendler started a company tradition of sending free ice cream to orphanages and to children in hospital wards. Advertisements in the paper invited institutions to participate and the list of beneficiaries grew each year. Hendler’s also sent ice cream to the penitentiary and even once, during World War II, to American prisoner-of-war camps!

 

Billboards advertising the Hendler Christmas donations of ice cream. Photos by Harry B. Leopold. Anonymous Gift, 1998.47.10.1, 11.31, 11.33.

Conclusion

Baltimore has long played an important role in America’s ice cream industry – after all, Mr. Jacob Fussell, the “father of wholesale ice cream manufacturing,” was a Baltimorean. L. Manuel Hendler was the chairman of the Ice Cream Industry’s National Centennial Committee, which celebrated the 100th anniversary of Mr. Fussell’s feat here in Baltimore in 1951. But the Hendler Creamery Company will forever reign supreme as “The Velvet Kind” of Baltimore memory.

Check out the crowd at the Ice Cream Centennial luncheon! Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Boltanksy, 1996.152.3.

~The End~

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HENDLERS: The Velvet Kind, An Image Gallery Part 2

Posted on July 16th, 2018 by

Article by Rachel Kassman. Originally published in Generations 2011 – 2012: Jewish Foodways.  Information on how to purchase your own copy here. 


What’s a Kewpie?

These cherubic characters, inspired by the Roman god of desire Cupid, first appeared in the Ladies Home Journal in 1909. Created by illustrator Rose O’Neill, the Kewpie has graced everything from books to pianos to ice cream advertisements.  Hendler Creamery Company used the Kewpie as its mascot for many years – Manuel Hendler even had a few ties with Kewpies hand-painted on the silk by Ms. O’Neill.

Advertising cards featuring Rose O’Neill’s “kewpies” for Hendler’s Ice Cream. All are signed by the artist. Gift of Maxine A. Cohen, 1990.180.01, 4

Rose O’Neill (1874-1944) was a prolific artist, inventor and suffragette. She produced art and illustrations for Harper’sLife, Collier’s, and Puck, among many others, published four novels and a poetry collection (all of which she illustrated) and exhibited her work both in the United States and abroad. She even inspired a song, “Rose of Washington Square! You can learn more about Rose HERE and HERE.

Left: Rose O’Neill, photo by Gertrude Kasebier, c. 1907. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, CP 65.2012.001. Right: Illustration by Rose O’Neill. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, CP 65.2012.002.

Pint box with Kewpie.  Anonymous Gift, 1998.47.15.2.

Billboards with Kewpies. Anonymous Gift, 1998.47.4.114, 163.

Sennett Bathing Beauties

Mack Sennett girls promoting Hendler’s – their holiday-themed costumes let viewers know that Hendler’s Ice Cream is for every season! Museum purchase with assistance from Jack and Ellen Kahan Zager, 1996.148.7.

These Sennett Bathing Beauties demonstrate that ice cream is for all seasons, from Christmas to the Fourth of July! Beginning in 1915, Mack Sennett, the “innovator of slapstick comedy in film,” brought together a group of girls known as the Sennett Bathing Beauties to appear in comedy shorts, promotional material, and at promotional events. The somewhat risqué nature of the group – being photographed in bathing costumes – proved a popular marketing device. Hendler Creamery Company clearly decided to capitalize on the phenomenon.

Mack Sennet, 1910. CP 66.2012.001. The Sennett Girls at work. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, CP 65.2012.006

Continue to Part III of HENDLERS: The Velvet Kind, An Image Gallery

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