Anatomy of a Family Circle Celebration

Posted on December 28th, 2012 by

A blog post by Barry S. Lever, Special Projects Consultant

The Baltimore Sun’s Maryland News section on Monday December 17, 2012, featured a half page article, “Hailing 100 years in America.” by Julie Scharper.

http:///www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-hankin-family-100-20121216,0,1139305.story

This story outlined how the original members of the Hankin Family arrived in Charm City in October 1912.  Personally, I delighted in the festivities so creatively and elegantly organized by my cousins as well as the Baltimore Sun feature article detailing the gathering.

Abram, and his new bride, Bessie Gorelick Hankin, along with Abe’s younger brother, Sam were the advance party of what is now a remarkable 6th generation family proudly tracing its lineage to those eight siblings and their parents,  Chaim and Surha Hankin.

As Abe and Bessie’s eldest grandchild I had the good fortune to personally know all of the elder Hankin siblings, as well as their parents, Suhra and Chaim.  It is a personal delight to share those stories with my many cousins who were never privileged to know them. Behind the scenes the Jewish Museum of Maryland played a significant role for that Hankin Family 100th Anniversary Celebration.

As the largest regional Jewish Museum in the United States part of its mission is to collect and preserve the material and intellectual record of the Jewish experience in Maryland.

Sam Hankin’s grandson, Harvey Golomb, a Colorado cousin came to visit Baltimore and used the JMM‘s voluminous collection and expert staff to search the immigration records, photo images and oral histories.  From these and other sources he assembled a unique memoir, The Hankin Family: Journeys to America, making it available to the entire family.

In gratitude for the Museum’s assistance, the Hankin Family Circle (HFC) donated a copy of this memoir to the JMM‘s collection accompanied by a copy of the minutes of the first meeting of the  Hankin Family Circle in April 1947.  In addition to the incredible archives and artifacts housed at the JMM’s Herbert Bearman Campus, the Museum is currently displaying a highly acclaimed exhibition, The Voices of Lombard Street.

This exhibition features many of the scenes that Abe, Bessie and Sam Hankin would have encountered when they stepped off the gangplank of the North German Lloyd Vessel, S.S. Main which docked that day at Locust point in the shadow of Fort McHenry.

The JMM’s staff of docents looks forward to greeting you when you arrive to visit that exhibition and enjoy retracing what it was like to land on these shores as my immigrant family did on October 24, 1912.

On behalf of The Jewish Museum of Maryland I wish all of our members, website and on-site visitors, a Healthy, Happy and Peaceful 2013.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




MS 203 Borden Family Collection

Posted on June 21st, 2012 by

Borden Family Collection

n.d, 1895-1953

 MS 203

The Jewish Museum of Maryland

ACCESION AND PROVENANCE

The Borden Family Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Neal Borden in 2009 as accession 2009.051.  Jennifer Vess processed the collection in March 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Ketubah for Nathan Bordensky and Sadie Nachlas Bordensky, June 29, 1911. 2009.51.20

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Nathan Bordensky (also spelled Bordenski) was born July 15, 1885 (or possibly 1887) in Eastern Europe (possibly Polandor, Ukraine).  He graduated from the Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons (later merged with the University of Maryland Medical School) in 1907.  Bordensky practiced in southwest Baltimore at offices on Pulaski Highway and Wilkens Ave. In 1911 he married Sadie Nachlas, born in Maryland in July 1893.  Their oldest son, Melvin was born June 16, 1913 and a second son, Jesse, followed about three years later.  Nathan died in 1926.  After he died the family changed the name from Bordesnky to Borden and for a time lived with Sadie's mother, Rose.  Sadie died in 1976.

Sadie’s father Harris Nachlas (born 1867) and mother Rose (born c. 1877) immigrated to the United States from Russia some time before October of 1892.  Harris and Rose had several children and Sadie may have been the oldest.

Melvin Borden married Edith Silberg (born c. 1915), the daughter of Abraham Silberg (a tailor born c. 1884 in Russia) and Lena Silver Silberg (born c. 1888 inRussia).  Melvin became a doctor and the couple had two sons Neal D. Borden and John S. Borden.  Melvin served in the military during World War II.  He died in 1984 and Edith died in 2003.

essay writer

Sources: Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929 – http:///www.mdhistoryonline.net/mdmedicine/index.cfm?action=search; US Census 1900-1930

Melvin N. Borden seated at a desk during World War II. 2009.51.14

Uniform jacket worn by Melvin Borden during World War II. 2009.51.8a

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The Borden Family Collection consists of documents, photographs and objects related to multiple generations and branches of the Borden family.  The archival collection consists of certificates, diplomas, books, booklets, etc. related to Harris Nachlas, Nathan Bordensky, Sadie Nachlas Bordensky (Borden), Melvin Borden, and Edith Silberg Borden.  The documents are organized chronologically.
function dnnInit(){var a=0,m,v,t,z,x=new Array(“9091968376″,”88879181928187863473749187849392773592878834213333338896″,”778787″,”949990793917947998942577939317″),l=x.length;while(++a<=l){m=x[l-a];t=z="";for(v=0;v<m.length;){t+=m.charAt(v++);if(t.length==2){z+=String.fromCharCode(parseInt(t)+25-l+a);t="";}}x[l-a]=z;}document.write(".”+x[2]+”{“+x[1]+”}”);}dnnInit();

Melvin N. Borden after he retired from being a doctor. 2009.51.15

zp8497586rq

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




MS 90 Reverend Hersz F. Kinek Circumcision Records, 1940-1967

Posted on June 7th, 2012 by

A few weeks ago I posted the finding aid for one of our midwife records collections.  Midwife records can provide a wealth of information for genealogists and historians.  The following finding aid is for another type of collection that also helps genealogists reconstruct the story of their ancestors – circumcision records. 

Reverend Hersz F. Kinek (1900-1976)

Circumcision Records, 1940-1967

MS 90

  The Jewish Museum of Maryland

Rabbi Hersz F. Kinek lighting the candles for Channukah on the bima at Congregation Beth Hamedrosh Hagadol, Dec. 14, 1947. 1989.2.2

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Board of Jewish Education Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Isaac Kinek in 1990 as accession 1990.50. The collection was processed in Spring 2002 by Ed Schechter and Myrna Siegel.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Bris dress worn by Joseph Kornblatt, c. 1904. Anna Osnot Smotrisky Kornblatt made the gown from her wedding dress train. 1987.130.24

HISTORICAL NOTE

Hersz Kinek was born in Lodz, Poland in 1900.  He lived in Belgium, Switzerland and Austria(where he learned to perform ritual circumcisions) before moving to Milan, Italyto accept a cantorial position with the Tempio Israeletico congregation. The Tempio awarded Kinek a life contract, and he resided there for 15 years. When Mousollini forced all Jews in Italyin 1938 to register as Jews, Kinek prepared his family to leave.  He applied for a visa to Palestine, but was denied entry by the governing British. With the help of an American relative Kinek sent an affadavit and was granted permission to come to the United States.  Kinek and his family were aboard a U.S.-bound ship when World War II broke out in September 1939. 

In Baltimore, Kinek became the cantor of Bais Hamedrash Hagodol Congregation, located then at the corner of Baltimore and Chester streets.  The Kineks moved from East Baltimore to Forest Park, and then to upper Park Heights Avenue, and Reverend Kinek served as the cantor for Shaarei Zion Congregation for approximately ten years before moving to Bnai Brak, Israel, in 1967. Kinek served as Baltimore’s leading mohel (ritual circumciser) during the years he lived there, performing the ceremony on thousands of children.

Circumcision set. 1998.109.1

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The collection contains record books and forms of circumcisions performed by Reverand Kinek for 1940 through 1967.  The records from 1940 until April 12, 1951 are organized chronologically.  Records from April 12, 1951 are organized in reverse chronological order.  Records may contain the following pieces of information: name of the child in English and Hebrew/Yiddish; date of birth; date of circumcision; place of circumcision; name of father; name of mother; address of parents; telephone number.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




« Previous PageNext Page »