MS 207 Hebrew Young Men’s Sick Relief Association

Posted on January 3rd, 2013 by

Here is one of our most recent Mansuscript Collections processed in the Spring of 2012.

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Hebrew Young Men?s Sick Relief Association Papers

1888-1978

?MS 207

?The Jewish Museum of Maryland

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ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Hebrew Young Men?s Sick Relief Association Papers were found in the collection of the Jewish Museum of Maryland and given the accession number 2006.48.001 and 1996.164.028.? The collection was processed in May of 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.? Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.? Papers may be copied in accordance with the library?s usual procedures.

50th Anniversary committee Hebrew Young Men's Sick Relief Association, 1938. Courtesy of Paul Frankle. 2009.53.1

HISTORICAL NOTE

The Hebrew Young Men?s Sick Relief Association was founded in September 1888 by three recent immigrants; Aaron Grollman, Feivel Kirshner and Samuel Levi.? Its main purpose was to assist immigrant Jews from Russia and Lithuania settling in Baltimore.? They adopted the slogan:? ?Love, Brotherhood and Friendship?.? Services included:? assisting members in time of sickness, aiding widows and orphans, and in times of disaster offering aid to all regardless of faith.

The Association established a Chevra Kadisha to properly attend to deceased members.? In 1893 they purchased land and dedicated it for a cemetery. In 1936 a new cemetery was bought on Windsor Mill Road.? The organization next established an endowment fund where, upon the death of a member, $200.00 was paid to the widows and orphans to assist them and prevent them from becoming public charges.

In public disasters the Association did its share and offered aid to the suffering regardless of faith;? in February 1904 when Baltimore had its Big Fire, during World Wars I and II, and after the Balfour Declaration contributed toward the establishment and development of Israel.

The Hebrew Young Men?s Sick and Relief Association celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 1938 when it had nearly a thousand members.? The Association was still in existence as late as 1978.

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The Hebrew Young Men?s Sick Relief Association collection consists of administrative documents records and programs.? Records include constitution and by-laws in English and Yiddish, financial reports, agreements with cemeteries and minutes of meetings.

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Minutes include financial statements and rosters with the earliest in Yiddish.? There is information regarding programs and events from 1938 to 1978.

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Anatomy of a Family Circle Celebration

Posted on December 28th, 2012 by

A blog post by Barry S. Lever, Special Projects Consultant

The Baltimore Sun’s Maryland News section on Monday December 17, 2012, featured a half page article, “Hailing 100 years in America.” by Julie Scharper.

http:///www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-hankin-family-100-20121216,0,1139305.story

This story outlined how the original members of the Hankin Family arrived in Charm City in October 1912.  Personally, I delighted in the festivities so creatively and elegantly organized by my cousins as well as the Baltimore Sun feature article detailing the gathering.

Abram, and his new bride, Bessie Gorelick Hankin, along with Abe’s younger brother, Sam were the advance party of what is now a remarkable 6th generation family proudly tracing its lineage to those eight siblings and their parents,  Chaim and Surha Hankin.

As Abe and Bessie’s eldest grandchild I had the good fortune to personally know all of the elder Hankin siblings, as well as their parents, Suhra and Chaim.  It is a personal delight to share those stories with my many cousins who were never privileged to know them. Behind the scenes the Jewish Museum of Maryland played a significant role for that Hankin Family 100th Anniversary Celebration.

As the largest regional Jewish Museum in the United States part of its mission is to collect and preserve the material and intellectual record of the Jewish experience in Maryland.

Sam Hankin’s grandson, Harvey Golomb, a Colorado cousin came to visit Baltimore and used the JMM‘s voluminous collection and expert staff to search the immigration records, photo images and oral histories.  From these and other sources he assembled a unique memoir, The Hankin Family: Journeys to America, making it available to the entire family.

In gratitude for the Museum’s assistance, the Hankin Family Circle (HFC) donated a copy of this memoir to the JMM‘s collection accompanied by a copy of the minutes of the first meeting of the  Hankin Family Circle in April 1947.  In addition to the incredible archives and artifacts housed at the JMM’s Herbert Bearman Campus, the Museum is currently displaying a highly acclaimed exhibition, The Voices of Lombard Street.

This exhibition features many of the scenes that Abe, Bessie and Sam Hankin would have encountered when they stepped off the gangplank of the North German Lloyd Vessel, S.S. Main which docked that day at Locust point in the shadow of Fort McHenry.

The JMM’s staff of docents looks forward to greeting you when you arrive to visit that exhibition and enjoy retracing what it was like to land on these shores as my immigrant family did on October 24, 1912.

On behalf of The Jewish Museum of Maryland I wish all of our members, website and on-site visitors, a Healthy, Happy and Peaceful 2013.

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MS 203 Borden Family Collection

Posted on June 21st, 2012 by

Borden Family Collection

n.d, 1895-1953

 MS 203

The Jewish Museum of Maryland

ACCESION AND PROVENANCE

The Borden Family Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Neal Borden in 2009 as accession 2009.051.  Jennifer Vess processed the collection in March 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Ketubah for Nathan Bordensky and Sadie Nachlas Bordensky, June 29, 1911. 2009.51.20

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Nathan Bordensky (also spelled Bordenski) was born July 15, 1885 (or possibly 1887) in Eastern Europe (possibly Polandor, Ukraine).  He graduated from the Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons (later merged with the University of Maryland Medical School) in 1907.  Bordensky practiced in southwest Baltimore at offices on Pulaski Highway and Wilkens Ave. In 1911 he married Sadie Nachlas, born in Maryland in July 1893.  Their oldest son, Melvin was born June 16, 1913 and a second son, Jesse, followed about three years later.  Nathan died in 1926.  After he died the family changed the name from Bordesnky to Borden and for a time lived with Sadie's mother, Rose.  Sadie died in 1976.

Sadie’s father Harris Nachlas (born 1867) and mother Rose (born c. 1877) immigrated to the United States from Russia some time before October of 1892.  Harris and Rose had several children and Sadie may have been the oldest.

Melvin Borden married Edith Silberg (born c. 1915), the daughter of Abraham Silberg (a tailor born c. 1884 in Russia) and Lena Silver Silberg (born c. 1888 inRussia).  Melvin became a doctor and the couple had two sons Neal D. Borden and John S. Borden.  Melvin served in the military during World War II.  He died in 1984 and Edith died in 2003.

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Sources: Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929 – http:///www.mdhistoryonline.net/mdmedicine/index.cfm?action=search; US Census 1900-1930

Melvin N. Borden seated at a desk during World War II. 2009.51.14

Uniform jacket worn by Melvin Borden during World War II. 2009.51.8a

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The Borden Family Collection consists of documents, photographs and objects related to multiple generations and branches of the Borden family.  The archival collection consists of certificates, diplomas, books, booklets, etc. related to Harris Nachlas, Nathan Bordensky, Sadie Nachlas Bordensky (Borden), Melvin Borden, and Edith Silberg Borden.  The documents are organized chronologically.
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Melvin N. Borden after he retired from being a doctor. 2009.51.15

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