A Look Back: the Ladies’ Auxiliary of Levindale Fall ‘76

Posted on October 25th, 2013 by

For my first project as an intern with the Jewish Museum of Maryland, I have been processing the Ladies Auxiliary of Levindale collection. In working with this collection I have learned a lot about the history of the Levindale Ladies Auxiliary and its members. Some of the most interesting pieces that I have gotten to work with are the issues of the Levindale Light which were released seasonally. Since it is fall, I thought I would take a look back at what the Ladies’ Auxiliary was doing this time of year in 1976.

Levindale Light- Fall 1976 Issue

Levindale Light- Fall 1976 Issue

In the Fall of 1976, Carole Fradkin had just completed her first year of being the President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary. Within that year the auxiliary had achieved several goals including the move of the Volunteer Gift Shop from the Kahn Levy Building into the Goldenberg Building off the main lobby and the necessary installment of sixty air conditioners for the bedrooms of all the residents. This achievement led to new goals for membership and future programs.

Carole Fradkin, President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of Levindale in 1976

Carole Fradkin, President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of Levindale in 1976

With the membership drive taking place, this issue highlighted the “Mother & Daughter Teams” of the Ladies’ Auxiliary. One of those mother daughter teams was the Fradkin family who were a third generation volunteer family. While Carole Fradkin was the president, her mother in law Mrs. I. A. Fradkin was in charge of keeping track of volunteers’ hours, and her daughter was close behind working as a Junior volunteer for several years.  Family was an important aspect of the Auxiliary as the issue states “Throughout the almost 50 years of the Auxiliary’s existence, our volunteers have developed a warm feeling towards the residents- which has generated among members of the volunteer families” (6). In reading through this particular issue and looking at the photographs from the collection, I can definitely say that the Ladies Auxiliary promoted a strong sense of community and family through their volunteer efforts and programs.

Two other mother-daughter teams are photographed volunteering and spending time with Mr. Bain. The mother-daughter teams from left to right are Gail Feinberg, Mrs. Henry Lesser, Jackie Lesser, and Mrs. Gilbert Feinberg.

Two other mother-daughter teams are photographed volunteering and spending time with Mr. Bain. The mother-daughter teams from left to right are Gail Feinberg, Mrs. Henry Lesser, Jackie Lesser, and Mrs. Gilbert Feinberg.

A blog post by Fall Collections Intern Meg Davis. To read additional blog posts by JMM interns, click here.

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Revisiting the JMM 1996 Expansion Part 2: More Bottles

Posted on October 16th, 2013 by

While going through the boxes of artifacts collected from the 1996 expansions, Carlyn and I have gone through a huge variety of glass and ceramic fragments. Some are very small and plain and it seems like there is not much to be said about them, or some fragments only contain small parts of words or designs that we are unable to decode even if we dig through all the resources available to us on the internet. However, when we find bottles or fragments that can provide a lot of interesting information, it’s very exciting!

Cheesebrough Manufacturing Company, Vaseline jar

Cheesebrough Manufacturing Company, Vaseline jar

One of the types of artifacts that I think are the most interesting is nineteenth century apothecary and medicine bottles. Because at this time it was common to have names of products or other propriety information embossed on the glass bottles themselves (as opposed to using paper labels), the designs and words on the glass bottles often contain a lot of information that can allow us to date the bottles very accurately. A small glass jar embossed with “Cheesebrough Mfc Co” and “Vaseline,” for example, obviously contained Vaseline, but we were able compare the exact design that the words are in and the style of the jar (which would have had a cork closure) to databases of other antique Vaseline jars that have been accurately dated, and we found that this exact jar was probably from the late 1880s.

E. W. Hoyt & Co.’s Rubifoam, "teeth cologne"

E. W. Hoyt & Co.’s Rubifoam, “teeth cologne”

Another interesting apothecary bottle we found in our collection was a small flat bottle that would have held E. W. Hoyt & Co.’s Rubifoam (pronounced “ruby-foam;” it was a bright red liquid) for the teeth. This was a “cologne” for the teeth, first introduced in 1887.

My favorite apothecary bottle in the collection is one from the pharmacy of Howard C. Silver, which was just down the street from JMM at the corner of Central Ave. and Fayette St. This bottle was initially difficult to research, since I could not find much information about the pharmacy, but once I tried researching Howard himself, I was able to find loads of information about him and his career in Baltimore. Howard C. Silver was an alumni (class of 1888) of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and apparently operated a pharmacy at N. Central Ave. and E. Fayette St. He is referenced multiple times in “hospital bulletins” from the UMD School of Medicine, which include lists of alumni. He was born in 1861, possibly in West Virginia, and was living in Baltimore by 1910. His wife was Mary M. Silver. He died Oct 22, 1933 of coronary thrombosis at the age of 72. Several memorial funds, fellowships, and scholarships at the School of Medicine exist in his memory or from his donations to the school, including the “Dr. Howard C. Silver Loan Fund” and the “Dr. Howard C. Silver Memorial Student Fellowship in Family Medicine.” It is amazing that a few pieces of a glass bottle found during some construction allow us to find out so much about one man’s life.

bottle fragments from Howard Silver's pharmacy.

bottle fragments from Howard Silver’s pharmacy.

close up of upper fragment

close up of upper fragment

close up of lower right fragment

close up of lower right fragment

A blog post from Collections Intern Molly Greenhouse. To read more posts from JMM interns, click here.

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Revisiting the 1996 JMM Expansion

Posted on October 10th, 2013 by

During the expansion of the Jewish Museum of Maryland in 1996 there were many collected and forgotten artifacts and objects that can from the grounds beneath the land surrounding the museum and synagogues.  My fellow Urban Archaeology intern, Molly, and I have been taking a look at these forgotten objects, cataloging, cleaning and photographing them. Most of the materials we handle are different fragments of bottles, various glass, ceramics and metal, as well as some unidentified objects.

Bottle from the Bartholomay Brewing Company.

Bottle from the Bartholomay Brewing Company.

My favorite finds were the glass beer and soda bottles with embossing on them from various old Baltimore breweries that I dated to 1910 from researching the year of establishment of the name of the brewery. Some names that turned up frequently were the Bauernschmidt Co, American Brewing Co, Global Brewing Co, and Bartholomay Brewing Co. Often, the name would not be embossed, but just a monogram of a letter, and by using various websites we researched what company the particular monogram belonged to. There are also a number of small medicine glass bottles from local pharmacies.

Fragment of a bottle from the Bauernschmidt Brewing Company.

Fragment of a bottle from the Bauernschmidt Brewing Company.

Now that we have successfully assigned accession numbers to every object and added it into our database, and now we have begun the process of washing, labeling and photographing them! Woo!

A blog post by fall collections intern Carlyn Thomas. To read more posts by and about interns, click here.

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