HENDLERS: The Velvet Kind, An Image Gallery Part 2

Posted on July 16th, 2018 by

Article by Rachel Kassman. Originally published in Generations 2011 – 2012: Jewish Foodways.  Information on how to purchase your own copy here. 


What’s a Kewpie?

These cherubic characters, inspired by the Roman god of desire Cupid, first appeared in the Ladies Home Journal in 1909. Created by illustrator Rose O’Neill, the Kewpie has graced everything from books to pianos to ice cream advertisements.  Hendler Creamery Company used the Kewpie as its mascot for many years – Manuel Hendler even had a few ties with Kewpies hand-painted on the silk by Ms. O’Neill.

Advertising cards featuring Rose O’Neill’s “kewpies” for Hendler’s Ice Cream. All are signed by the artist. Gift of Maxine A. Cohen, 1990.180.01, 4

Rose O’Neill (1874-1944) was a prolific artist, inventor and suffragette. She produced art and illustrations for Harper’sLife, Collier’s, and Puck, among many others, published four novels and a poetry collection (all of which she illustrated) and exhibited her work both in the United States and abroad. She even inspired a song, “Rose of Washington Square! You can learn more about Rose HERE and HERE.

Left: Rose O’Neill, photo by Gertrude Kasebier, c. 1907. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, CP 65.2012.001. Right: Illustration by Rose O’Neill. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, CP 65.2012.002.

Pint box with Kewpie.  Anonymous Gift, 1998.47.15.2.

Billboards with Kewpies. Anonymous Gift, 1998.47.4.114, 163.

Sennett Bathing Beauties

Mack Sennett girls promoting Hendler’s – their holiday-themed costumes let viewers know that Hendler’s Ice Cream is for every season! Museum purchase with assistance from Jack and Ellen Kahan Zager, 1996.148.7.

These Sennett Bathing Beauties demonstrate that ice cream is for all seasons, from Christmas to the Fourth of July! Beginning in 1915, Mack Sennett, the “innovator of slapstick comedy in film,” brought together a group of girls known as the Sennett Bathing Beauties to appear in comedy shorts, promotional material, and at promotional events. The somewhat risqué nature of the group – being photographed in bathing costumes – proved a popular marketing device. Hendler Creamery Company clearly decided to capitalize on the phenomenon.

Mack Sennet, 1910. CP 66.2012.001. The Sennett Girls at work. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, CP 65.2012.006

Continue to Part III of HENDLERS: The Velvet Kind, An Image Gallery

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#ColorOurCollections

Posted on February 3rd, 2016 by

Here’s our second entry for this week’s #ColorOurCollections extravaganza – and we’re pretty sure we couldn’t have gone cuter!

A truly sweet bunch!

A truly sweet bunch! JMM 1998.47.4.156

Enjoy this kewpie-themed coloring book with our compliments: Download A Cutie Kewpie Coloring Book

And remember to share your creations with us on twitter @jewishmuseummd and facebook, using the hashtag #ColorOurCollections.

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