A Valentine’s Day Visit: KSDS Third Graders at the JMM

Posted on February 28th, 2018 by

This post was written by JMM Visitor Services Coordinator Paige Woodhouse. To read more posts from Paige, click here!

On February 14th the Museum was alive with the sounds of students! Krieger Schechter Day School’s third grade class was immersed in the sights, sounds, and stories of Jewish immigrants who called the neighborhood around the Museum home.

It is always refreshing to experience the Voices of Lombard Street exhibit through the eyes and voices of students. An immigrant is “someone who moves from one country to another.” Immigrants might have brought different things with them when they moved, like “pots and pans,” “family photographs,” or they might “wear all their clothes.”

Krieger Schechter Day School’s third grade class in the Voices of Lombard Street Exhibit.

After listening to the hustle and bustle of Lombard Street and counting the chickens in the coop, one students said that “Lombard Street was really busy!” Other students learned that “a pickle was a nickel” and that there were outhouses where “sometimes they used book pages for toilet paper.”

Following their journey through Lombard Street, students discovered the first Synagogue to be built in Maryland, the Lloyd Street Synagogue.

KSDS students standing in front of the Lloyd Street Synagogue.

Putting on their archaeologist hats, students worked together to discover real artifacts found during excavations done for the Museum. Using the same method that archaeologists used, the students learned about the history of the people who worshipped in the Lloyd Street Synagogue.

KSDS students working together to document where pieces of their mystery artifact were located.

It was a delight to have Krieger Schechter Day School’s third grade class visit the Museum! If you are interested in bringing your class to the Museum, please contact me, Paige Woodhouse at pwoodhouse@jewishmuseummd.org to learn more.

Make sure to ask about our educational programs for the special exhibit Amending America: The Bill of Rights, on loan from the National Archives and Records Administration, on display from April 8th to May 28th.

Not a student? After taking a peek in our guest book, here’s what other visitors have to say following their adventure through Voices of Lombard Street:

“Brought back memories. I learned to sew on [a] pedal machine, bought chickens and watched them be killed. My mother, a Christian from Galicia, lit candles for Sabbath. Love it. Well done. Will return.”

“Loved seeing and hearing the Lombard Street.”

“Fantastic exhibit – my children (aged 6 & 9) loved and played with all the child-friendly attractions. Thank you!”

“Thank you for such an interesting exhibit about immigrants to Baltimore. I especially loved all the quotes.”

“Very nice trip down memory lane.”

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Stepping Back in Time

Posted on February 24th, 2016 by

Walking into the Krieger Schechter Day School on a dreary and snowy February day, my colleagues Trillion, Joanna and I felt as though we had traveled back in time. Students wearing poodle skirts and letter jackets roamed the halls and the sounds of rock and roll played in the background. We had come to participate in the middle school’s Learning Festival, a three-day break from normal academics when the entire student body immerses itself in the study of a specific theme through speakers, field trips and a variety of hands-on activities. This year’s theme, “The 1950s: From Prosperity to Protest”, was an especially rich topic, one that was clearly embraced by students and teachers alike.

The JMM was thrilled to be invited to participate. To help shed light on an important 1950s trend, suburbanization, we installed our traveling exhibition, Jews on the Move, which examines the history of the move of Baltimore’s Jewish community from the city to the suburbs from 1945-68. The exhibition was on view for two weeks in a hallway near Chizuk Amuno’s sanctuary where it was enjoyed by both the school community as well as by synagogue congregants.

Jews on the Move was developed as a collaborative project with The Program in Museums and Society at the Johns Hopkins University. It was originally installed in 2012 at the Johns Hopkins University. It has since been featured at many additional venues including the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Library and several synagogues.

Jews on the Move was developed as a collaborative project with The Program in Museums and Society at the Johns Hopkins University. It was originally installed in 2012 at the Johns Hopkins University. It has since been featured at many additional venues including the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Library and several synagogues.

In addition to having the exhibit on view, Trillion and I led two workshops for students during which they had an opportunity to look for photos and stories in the exhibit (bonus points for finding a 1960s photo of Chizuk Amuno!).

Students viewing the exhibit.

Students viewing the exhibit.

Students viewing the exhibit.

Students viewing the exhibit.

They then worked together in groups to review 1950s era advertisements from real estate companies that ran in the Jewish Times that tried to entice suburban home buyers. Students were asked to identify what features were highlighted to appeal to potential buyers (spacious floor plans, new and modern appliances, yards, etc) and how the use of images and typography helped make the case.

Ads like this one from the Jewish Times in 1960 appealed to families looking to move out of crowded homes in the city.

Ads like this one from the Jewish Times in 1960 appealed to families looking to move out of crowded homes in the city.

After they had analyzed their photos, students then designed their own ad for a 1950s-era suburban development that they shared with classmates.  We loved the enthusiasm with which the students tackled this assignment and were even treated to an advertising jingle and dance by one of the groups.

deborahA blog post by Deputy Director Deborah Cardin. To read more posts from Deborah click HERE.

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