Once Upon a Time…03.08.2013

Posted on May 21st, 2013 by

The Baltimore Jewish Times publishes unidentified photographs from the collection of Jewish Museum of Maryland each week. If you can identify anyone in these photos and more information about them, contact Jobi Zink, Senior Collections Manager and Registrar at 410.732.6400 x226 or jzink@jewishmuseummd.org.

Date run in Baltimore Jewish Times:  March 8, 20131993173062

PastPerfect Accession #:  1993.173.062

Status:  Unidentified! Do you know these young men at Camp Moshava, a Labor Zionist Camp?

 

 

 

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MS 13 Dr. Herman Seidel Papers

Posted on May 19th, 2011 by

The following finding aid describes one of our early collections.  It is an important record of the work of a single person, but also contains extensive records related to several organizations of the early twentieth century.  Some of our dedicated readers might recognize the name of one of them — the Labor Zionist Organization of America.  Several weeks ago we post the finding aid for MS 21 League Chaper of Labor Zionist Organization of America.  The Jewish Museum of Maryland has collections from individuals as well as organizations, and sometimes the inviduals appear in the archives of the organizations, or the organizations appear in the papers of the individuals.  By looking at multiple manuscript collections researchers can find the details they need to create a full and rich story.

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Herman Seidel in his University of Maryland medical school graduation photo, 1910. 1993.043.070

Dr. Herman Seidel Papers

1945-1991

 MS 13

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

 The Dr. Herman Seidel Papers were donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Dr. Arthur Leslie as accession 1989.82.  Myrna Siegel processed the collection in December 2009.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

 Dr. Herman Seidel was born on April 12, 1884 in Lithuania on the Latvian border.  His education had prepared him to become a teacher of Hebrew, a profession he pursued after arriving in Baltimore in 1903.  He brought his interest in Zionism with him, and in 1905 was chairman of the committee to convene the first Labor Zionist convention in Baltimore.

In 1906 Dr. Seidel entered medical school at the former College of Physicians and Surgeons (affiliated with the University of Maryland), and graduated in 1910. In 1914 Dr. Seidel entered into active medical practice.  While in practice he maintained his interest in community activities.   He was active in Zionist activities on the local and national levels and Jewish education on the local level.

Among his Zionist activities were organizing and recruiting for the Jewish Legion for Palestine in 1917 and 1918; acting as a participant in the organization of the American Jewish congress and as a delegate to its preliminary conference in 1916 and subsequent years; organizing the first National committee for Investments in Israel in 1932; acting as a delegate to the 19th World Zionist Conference in Lucerne, Switzerland in 1935; acting as a participant in the organization of the American Palestine Trading Corporation (AMPAL) in 1940; and acting as President of the League for Labor Palestine of  America from 1940-1947.

Dr. Seidel’s interest in Geriatrics began in the early 1930’s when he read a paper on the problems facing the aged.  In 1948 at Dr. Seidel’s suggestion, the Baltimore City Medical Society organized its first Committee on Geriatrics.  Dr. Seidel was appointed Chairman and remained so until 1961.  He was a fellow of the American Geriatric Society from its inception in 1954 and a member of the American Gerontological Society from 1948.

In 1950, Dr. Seidel organized the first full-day citywide conference on Geriatrics in Baltimore.  Subsequently, Mayor Thomas D’Alessandro of Baltimore appointed a Commission to study the problems of aging in the City of Baltimore to which Dr. Seidel was appointed. Dr. Seidel later served on the Commission appointed by Mayor D’Alessandro to study the problems of aging in Baltimore, on the Maryland Commission for the Aging, and on the Committee on Geriatrics appointed by the Maryland State Medical Association.

Dr. Seidel died in 1969.

Dr. Herman Seidel outside a hotel in Israel, 1957. 1989.82.6

 HISTORICAL NOTE

The Labor Zionist Organization of America-Poale Zion was founded in 1905 and held its first convention in Baltimore.  The national mission of the organization was to support the establishment of Israel.  Once Israel became a county in 1948, the LZOA became active in continuing to support the growth of Israel.  One of the main campaigns that came out of Labor Zionism in America was the Histadrut campaign which sent money to border settlements in Israel as well as helping new immigrants and financing the development of Israel.

In the early 1970s the Labor Zionist Organization of America-Poale Zion merged with two other labor Zionist organizations, Farband, a labor Zionist fraternal order, and the American Habonim Association, a labor Zionist youth organization.  These three groups newly merged together became known as the Labor Zionist Alliance.  The newly formed Alliance continued to work for progress in Israel and in 2004 changed its name to Ameinu which continues to work for the same goals.

The League Chapter, the Baltimore chapter, of the Labor Zionist Organization of America began in 1945.  When it was formed it was called the Zionist Guild but by the end of 1946 it was being called the League Chapter of the LZOA.  While the chapter itself did not begin until then, labor Zionist activities had begun much earlier.  The founder of the national organization, Dr. Herman Seidel, was from Baltimore and did much work in Baltimore and in America to spread the Labor Zionist viewpoint.  In 1934 Jacob Janofsky allowed labor Zionists to use his land as a training farm so that young people could learn agricultural skills to take with them to Israel.  Camp Gordonia, which was also a labor Zionist camp was formed in 1935 but soon merged with Habonim in 1938.  However, an official chapter did not exist until 1945.

In the mid 1950s, the League Chapter changed its name to League for Israel but the change was in name only.  When the organization became Labor Zionist Alliance it seems that a Baltimore chapter still existed however it is unclear if Ameinu still has different chapters.

Dr. Herman Seidel with a Zionist group believed to be Poalei Zion, c. 1905. 1963.9.1

Scope And Content

The Dr. Herman Seidel Papers are comprised primarily of papers relating to Dr. Seidel’s wide ranging Zionist activities as well as his professional activities as a physician.  The papers are divided into three series: Series I. Personal and Professional Life, n.d., 1910-1969; Series II. Major Zionist Activities, n.d., 1932-1962; and Series III. Subject Matter and Correspondence Files, n.d.,

Series I.  Personal and Professional Life, n.d., 1910-1969 includes material relating to Dr. Seidel’s personal life relating to financial activities, celebrations and personal correspondence.  There is also material relating to his medical practice and subsequent interest and actions in the field of gerontology.

Series II. Major Zionist Activities, n.d., 1932-1962 includes material relating to the four Zionist organizations with which Dr. Seidel was primarily involved.  Those four are the Labor Zionist Organization of America – Poale Zion, AMPAL, the American Palestine Trading Co., Heirut Beth and Histadrut.

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Series III. Subject Matter and Correspondence Files, n.d. includes correspondence with individuals and organizations as well clippings of interest to Dr. Seidel.

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MS 21 League Chapter of Labor Zionist Organization of America (LZOA)

Posted on January 6th, 2011 by

This collection while one of our earlier manuscript collections, was not fully processed until recently.  Past archivists had placed the papers into the requisite pH neutral folders and boxes and removed the staples and paperclips.  Someone had also handwritten an inventory of the folders, but no one had written up a finding aid, which provides the basic historical and content information that helps researches find the materials they need.  This collection also came with several objects pictured below.

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Stamp used by the LZOA, 2007.48.2

 League Chapter of Labor Zionist Organization of America (LZOA) Records, 1945-1991

 MS 21

 The Jewish Museum of Maryland

 ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

 The League Chapter of Labor Zionist Organization of American Records was found in the collection (FIC) of the Jewish Museum of Maryland. The Manuscript Collection was given the accession number 2007.048 in 2007. The collection was processed by Jen Pollack in August 2007.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

 HISTORICAL NOTE

 The Labor Zionist Organization of America-Poale Zion (LZOA) was founded in 1905 and held its first convention in Baltimore.  The national mission of the organization was to support the establishment of Israel.  Once Israel became a county in 1948, the LZOA became active in continuing to support the growth of Israel.  One of the main campaigns that came out of Labor Zionism in America was the Histadrut campaign, which sent money to border settlements in Israel, assisted new immigrants, and financed the development of Israel.  As well as helping to support Israel, this Zionist movement supported the labor movement from the belief in economic and social equality in Israel, America and the world.  It was active in funding and establishing of kibbutzim.

In the early 1970s the Labor Zionist Organization of America-Poale Zion merged with two other labor Zionist organizations – Farband, a labor Zionist fraternal order, and the American Habonim Association, a labor Zionist youth organization.  These three groups became known as the Labor Zionist Alliance.  The newly formed Alliance continued to work for progress in Israel and in 2004 changed its name to Ameinu.

The League Chapter (the Baltimore chapter) of the Labor Zionist Organization of America began in 1945.  When formed, the group called itself the Zionist Guild, but by the end of 1946 its name was changed to League Chapter of the LZOA. While the chapter itself did not begin until 1946, labor Zionist activities had begun much earlier.  The founder of the national organization, Dr. Herman Seidel, a Baltimorean, worked to spread the Labor Zionist viewpoint in Baltimore and throughout the United States. In 1934 Jacob Janofsky allowed labor Zionists to use his land as a training farm so that young people could learn agricultural skills to take with them to Israel.  Camp Gordonia, which was also a labor Zionist camp, was formed in 1935 but soon merged with Habonim in 1938.  All of these activities predated the League Chapter’s official founding date of 1945.

In the mid 1950s, the League Chapter changed its name to League for Israel.  The Labor Zionist Alliance, and now Ameinu, maintains an office in the city of Baltimore.

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The League Chapter of Labor Zionist Organization of America (LZOA) Collection contains materials relating to their organizational structure. The collection contains meeting minutes, the constitution and by laws for the organization, event programs and promotional materials, and campaign materials. These records span between the Organization’s founding in 1945 and end in 1991.

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This pin came in with the LZOA collection, 2007.48.1

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