MS 90 Reverend Hersz F. Kinek Circumcision Records, 1940-1967

Posted on June 7th, 2012 by

A few weeks ago I posted the finding aid for one of our midwife records collections.  Midwife records can provide a wealth of information for genealogists and historians.  The following finding aid is for another type of collection that also helps genealogists reconstruct the story of their ancestors – circumcision records. 

Reverend Hersz F. Kinek (1900-1976)

Circumcision Records, 1940-1967

MS 90

  The Jewish Museum of Maryland

Rabbi Hersz F. Kinek lighting the candles for Channukah on the bima at Congregation Beth Hamedrosh Hagadol, Dec. 14, 1947. 1989.2.2

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Board of Jewish Education Collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Isaac Kinek in 1990 as accession 1990.50. The collection was processed in Spring 2002 by Ed Schechter and Myrna Siegel.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Bris dress worn by Joseph Kornblatt, c. 1904. Anna Osnot Smotrisky Kornblatt made the gown from her wedding dress train. 1987.130.24

HISTORICAL NOTE

Hersz Kinek was born in Lodz, Poland in 1900.  He lived in Belgium, Switzerland and Austria(where he learned to perform ritual circumcisions) before moving to Milan, Italyto accept a cantorial position with the Tempio Israeletico congregation. The Tempio awarded Kinek a life contract, and he resided there for 15 years. When Mousollini forced all Jews in Italyin 1938 to register as Jews, Kinek prepared his family to leave.  He applied for a visa to Palestine, but was denied entry by the governing British. With the help of an American relative Kinek sent an affadavit and was granted permission to come to the United States.  Kinek and his family were aboard a U.S.-bound ship when World War II broke out in September 1939. 

In Baltimore, Kinek became the cantor of Bais Hamedrash Hagodol Congregation, located then at the corner of Baltimore and Chester streets.  The Kineks moved from East Baltimore to Forest Park, and then to upper Park Heights Avenue, and Reverend Kinek served as the cantor for Shaarei Zion Congregation for approximately ten years before moving to Bnai Brak, Israel, in 1967. Kinek served as Baltimore’s leading mohel (ritual circumciser) during the years he lived there, performing the ceremony on thousands of children.

Circumcision set. 1998.109.1

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The collection contains record books and forms of circumcisions performed by Reverand Kinek for 1940 through 1967.  The records from 1940 until April 12, 1951 are organized chronologically.  Records from April 12, 1951 are organized in reverse chronological order.  Records may contain the following pieces of information: name of the child in English and Hebrew/Yiddish; date of birth; date of circumcision; place of circumcision; name of father; name of mother; address of parents; telephone number.

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MS 202 Hymen Saye Collection 1922-1989

Posted on May 10th, 2012 by

Hymen Saye (1907-1993) Collection

1992-1989

MS 202

The Jewish Museum of Maryland

Accession and Provenance

The Hymen Saye collection was donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Hymen Saye as accession 1991.7.  The collection was processed byRebeccaLouderback in March 2012.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection.  Papers may be copied in accordance with the library’s usual procedures.

Hymen Saye teaching at Talmud Torah, 1928. 1991.7.13

Biographical Sketch

Hymen Saye was born in Baltimore in 1907.  His father Louis Saye, arrived in Baltimore from Latvia, in 1904.  Once he had a job as a tailor and a place to live, Louis sent for his wife and two daughters.  Growing up in a Yiddish only household, Hymen and his sisters spoke English only to each other and outside the home.  Louis Saye would eventually learn English, however Hymen’s mother never made the attempt.

Saye attended public schools # 73 on Aisquith and Orleans and school # 40.  Saye’s father made sure he attended Talmud Torah (later Talmudical Academy) in the evenings,.  Hymen participated in a junior congregation where he was the chazzan on shabbos.  At 14 or 15 he was given a class to teach at Talmud Torah on the condition that he would attend Baltimore Hebrew College (later Baltimore Hebrew University).  By age twenty four he was teaching forty hours a week.

Baltimore Hebrew College faculty. Featured include: Hymen Saye (6th from left), Harry Teback (5th from left), Bill (William) Furie (8th from left), and Leon Rivkin (far right). n.d. 1991.7.17

While still learning at Baltimore Hebrew College, Hymen attended City College and graduated in 1926. He stayed at City College for five years because he changed his courses from commercial to academic.  He received a teaching degree from Baltimore Hebrew College, which he attended in the evenings.  During the day he attended classes at Johns Hopkins.  In 1931, he became the principle of Chizuk Amuno Congregational School and received his M.A. from Johns Hopkins University.  Hymen retired from Chizuk Amuno in 1971.

Laura S. Saye. 1991.7.36

In 1931 Hymen married Laura Seidman, whom he had met at a picnic when he was about 14 or 15.  She was also interested in education and became a public school teacher after getting her degree at Towson Teacher College(now Towson University).  Early on Laura taught in East Baltimore, but because of her superior performance she was transferred to Mount Washington. She was the first Jewish teacher on the Mt.Washington facility. Laura shared similar interests with her husband, travel, Jewish ceremonial objects, Jewish art, languages, and pro-Israel activities.  Hymen Saye died in 1993.

Sources:

Saye, Hymen. Interviewed by Gertrude Nitzberg , 10 & 16 March 1983.  OH 183, Jewish Museum of Maryland, Baltimore MD.

“Chizuck Amuno School Director Retiring,” The Baltimore Sun, June 28, 1971, B6.

Hymen Saye teaching an Introduction to Hebrew at the College of Jewish Studies, November 1947. 1991.7.30

Scope and Content

The Hymen Saye Collection contains materials related to his personal life and his education.  This collection contains letters, invitations, programs, a bulletin, a yearbook, a manuscript translation, testimonials, speeches, a membership card and a loan contract. This collection is divided into two series: name series. Series I. Personal Papers, 1922-1989 and Series II, Professional Education, 1922-1985.  Series I. Personal Papers, 1922-1989 includes letters to and from Hymen and Laura Saye, as well as correspondence from various familial relations and friends.  The series is organized chronologically. Series II. Professional Education, 1922-1985 consists of materials relating to Hymen’s job as a Jewish educator and professional interests.  The materials have been organized alphabetically by folder.
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MS 76 Baltimore Zionist Federation Records

Posted on April 19th, 2012 by

The following collection is made up entirely of archives – no objects and no photographs.  The images that you will see in this post represent some of the organizations that fell under the Baltimore Zionist Federation, but here at the JMM the activities of the BZF can only be found in the written word.  The written word is, of course, very important, but it can only give us a partial understanding of a person or an organization, just has having a lone photograph can tell us some but not all of the story.  Having written documents, photographs and objects supporting each other can be extremely important in order to understand the past.  It’s also more visually interesting.  I’m an archivist so I love letters and diaries and meeting minutes, but I like putting faces to the names I read, or seeing the object they discuss.  Think about that as you go about your day-to-day life at home and at work – how much are you documenting and in what way?

Tzedakah box issued by Hadassah, 1993. 1993.92.2

Baltimore Zionist Federation

Records, n.d, 1972-1978

MS 76

       The Jewish Museum of Maryland

ACCESS AND PROVENANCE

The Baltimore Zionist Federation Records were donated to the Jewish Museum of Maryland by Mrs. Sylvia Goldman in 1985 as accession 1985.73. The collection was processed in July 2001 by Alisa Rose.

Access to the collection is unrestricted and is available to researchers at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Researchers must obtain the written permission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland before publishing quotations from materials in the collection. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Tzedekah box for the Jewish National Fund. 2000.54.4

HISTORICAL NOTE

The American Zionist Federation was established in 1970 as an “umbrella” organization to unite all American Zionist organizations.  It sponsors and promotes Zionist and Israel-related youth activities, educational programs, and public and communal affairs. The Baltimore branch of the American Zionist Federation, the Baltimore Zionist Federation, was established in 1971 to serve as the “umbrella” organization for many local organizations including Hadassah, the Baltimore District of the Zionist Organization of America, Mizrachi Men, Mizrachi Women, the American Labor Zionist Alliance Pioneer Women, and the Jewish National Fund.  The Baltimore Zionist Federation has implemented many ongoing projects such as Aliyah Conferences, Ulpanim, publications of Zionist interest, and scholar-in- residence programs.  In addition, they offer scholarships to Jewish students for travel and study in Israel.

Possible Baltimore Zionist District gathering. 1996.68.24.

SCOPE AND CONTENT

The Baltimore Zionist Federation Records include correspondence with community leaders, local congregations, government officials, and scholarship applicants, newspaper clippings, articles relating toIsrael, and information relating to Baltimore Zionist Federation fundraisers and events. Folders titled “Baltimore Jewish Council” contain minutes from Baltimore Jewish Council Board Meetings which were attended by representatives from several local organizations including Baltimore Zionist Federation representatives.  Collection also includes a petition that was sent to the Maryland Congressional Delegation requesting that they support H.R. 12203, the Foreign Assistance Contingency Resolution, which was intended to provide funds toIsrael. Folders are arranged alphabetically by folder title.

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