An Educational Summer: Voices from the West Wing

Posted on September 12th, 2017 by

This summer we asked our summer interns to team up and create their very own podcast episodes. Over the course of ten weeks they needed to pitch a concept, draft a script, and record and edit their podcasts. We’re going to share those podcasts here with you on the blog over the course of the next few weeks! You can see all of their podcasts by clicking on the intern podcast tag.


 

Education interns Erin Penn and Sara Philippe.

Education interns Erin Penn and Sara Philippe.

Summer education interns Erin Penn and Sara Philippe review their summer at the Jewish Museum of Maryland!

>>Listen to the Podcast<<


Winners of fabulous prizes at Intern Night trivia!

Winners of fabulous prizes at Intern Night trivia!

Campers hard at work on the Just Married! scavenger hunt.

Campers hard at work on the Just Married! scavenger hunt.


 

Listen to our “Henrietta Szold Favorites” playlist!

Henrietta Szold’s Baltimore from 1860-1902: an izi.travel mobile tour!


Eating Jewish: Iraqi Purim Delicacies: Sambusak el Tawa (Iraqi chickpea turnovers)

Zengoula with Lemon Syrup (Iraqi Funnel Cakes)


 


 

Detail of Tik (Torah case) and Glass Panel from Baghdad, 19th-20th centuries. In Jewish communities throughout the Middle East, the Torah scroll is generally housed in a rigid “tik” or case made of wood or metal.

Detail of Tik (Torah case) and Glass Panel from Baghdad, 19th-20th centuries. In Jewish communities throughout the Middle East, the Torah scroll is generally housed in a rigid “tik” or case made of wood or metal.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Quiet on Set…Now Recording in the West Wing of the JMM!

Posted on July 24th, 2017 by

Blog post by education intern Sara Philippe. To read more posts from JMM interns, past and present, click here.

When I began interning at the JMM this summer, I never expected to find myself in the recording studio during my time here, but this past week co-intern Erin and I became the voices of the JMM’s new, soon-to-be downloadable Henrietta Szold audio guide. Erin and I spent time, under Museum Educator Alex’s leadership, recording a script that outlines Henrietta Szold’s Baltimore for people interested in exploring this fascinating historical figure and the city when it was her home in the late 19th century. The audio guide describes Szold and other characters in a manner that emphasizes their humanity, bringing them to life as real-life people, while maintaining a focus on the larger events and movements that influenced her.

Our signed tour scripts

Our signed tour scripts

Szold is known as the founder of the global women’s organization Hadassah, and for her role in laying the groundwork for the founding of the state of Israel, and the tour acknowledges this, while making the choice not to stray from her formative years in Baltimore. As you listen, you will discover how Szold’s experiences observing Eastern European Jewish immigrants arrive on Baltimore’s shores and providing services to these people, was a major influence on the Zionist ideology she would grow to devote herself to. But you will also get snippets of insight into her relationship with her sisters and her unfailing dedication to her father Rabbi Benjamin Szold. It is through these detailed, honest portrayals that each stop of the tour becomes alive and personal, maintaining the important historical significance of the diverse locations on the tour’s thirteen stops.

The once Eutaw Place Temple, a stop on the tour

The once Eutaw Place Temple, a stop on the tour

By releasing this audio tour, the JMM is expanding to new media, areas, and audiences, participating in an effort to make the vital work it does in preserving and teaching history and culture accessible in new and exciting ways. The museum prides itself on its particular focus on Jewish history in the state of Maryland, and by creating a tour such as this one, it does an excellent job of extending its efforts at preservation beyond the walls of the museum. As most of the buildings included as stops on the tour no longer serve the purposes they did in Szold’s lifetime, the tour does the important work of reviving old meanings and forgotten histories. The audio guide is a perfect opportunity not only to learn about Szold’s early life in Baltimore, but also to explore the city itself in a new way, gaining knowledge about other important figures and events in Baltimore Jewish history. Ranging from the harbor where Szold’s family and many other immigrants first arrived in Baltimore, to locations that once housed synagogues and department stores, to the JMM itself, the audio tour will take you on a unique tour of Baltimore that will leave you hungry to know more.

Download the izi.TRAVEL app and be sure to check out the JMM’s new audio tour! You won’t want to miss hearing rising vocal stars Sara and Erin’s debut!

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Renewal and Revival: Indecent and the Education Department

Posted on July 5th, 2017 by

Blog post by Education Intern Sara Philippe. To read more posts from JMM interns, past and present, click here.

 

This past weekend, I saw the Broadway show Indecent in New York City. It is a play about God of Vengeance, a Yiddish play written by Polish Jewish writer Sholem Asch in 1907 that was performed across Europe in Yiddish, and eventually in the United States where it was translated into English and performed on Broadway, and then again in Poland during World War II where it was performed in an attic in the Lodz ghetto. The show is a powerful testament to the power of art and theatre, especially in its capacity to preserve history and make it relevant in the present. It is proof that what may seem a mere remnant or artifact, is in reality, a leaving, breathing thing. Among other things, Indecent brings to life the Yiddish language and its near-extinction as a result of assimilation of Jews in the US and the Holocaust in Europe.

The opening scene of Indecent. Captions are written in English and Yiddish or Hebrew throughout.

The opening scene of Indecent. Captions are written in English and Yiddish or Hebrew throughout.

It is in this effort to tell stories that are in danger of being lost that Indecent reminds me of my work at the JMM. As Education interns, Erin and I have been working on an educational resource for the upcoming exhibit Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage, which involves us in work guided by the same overarching principle that values history and heritage for its perpetual importance. In designing activities that will allow students of all ages to have more enjoyable and meaningful experiences of the exhibit, we have endeavored to treat every aspect of the contents of the exhibit as a reflection of living people and traditions as well as of people and traditions that existed in the past. Indecent’s writer Paul Vogel, and its director Rebecca Taichman, emphasize their desire to connect the material of the play to ongoing questions of xenophobia and immigration, for example, that pertain to the present day just as much as they did in early 20th century America. They tackle these issues in explicit terms and make no attempt to tell the story of God of Vengeance as if it has ended.

As we work towards a comprehensive education reference, our goal is always to encourage the future users of the resource to see the artifacts displayed in the exhibit as more than artifacts. A badly damaged schoolbook written in Arabic and used in Iraqi Jewish schools is not a collation of pages, but rather an opportunity to discuss efforts to ensure the survival of Judeo-Arabic, spoken by Iraqi Jews, and other minority languages that may be under threat. A tik, the Torah holder used in Iraqi Jewish communities becomes an opportunity to marvel at the evolution and varied uses of language, as we create an activity that asks students to re-interpret the word “tik” through actually making their own tik inspired by what they have learned about the word’s modern-day uses in Hebrew.  The story of the anti-Jewish pogroms in Baghdad in 1941 that led many to flee their native country, are an opportunity to consider minority persecution and displacement of peoples around the world and in Iraq today.

A tik from the Iraqi Jewish Archive.

A tik from the Iraqi Jewish Archive.

The stories of the past that animate Indecent as well as the Iraqi Jewish Archive offer us so much more than just a look at a time and people gone by. They are evidence of the resiliency of any people and the continuing desire we have to discover and recover, and to turn a richness that could have been lost and relegated solely to the past, into art and education. What I am learning in the Education department is the importance of turning everything behind a glass wall in an exhibit into a living creature with meanings and implications that must not be forgotten. Though it is often impossible to bring back to life what has been lost or destroyed, it is possible to enrich the lives of people today using the creations of the people of the past.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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