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Staying Connected with JMM: Opportunity to Showcase Student Art

Posted on May 21st, 2020 by

We are inviting young Marylanders to participate in an art project for a chance to have their work displayed during our Jews in Space exhibit.

Dear Educators,

Though you’re physically apart, you and your students are still working hard under one sky. Together you can all look up at the stars with wonder, imagination, and dreams. From the Hubble Space Telescope to the NASA Goddard Flight Center, Maryland is home to countless people who have dreamed, and continue to dream, of the wonders of space.

Join JMM this fall as we explore the lives of people who have studied, imagined, and even traveled into the cosmos. Jews in Space: Members of the Tribe in Orbit will share not only the contributions of the Jewish community to space-facing science and culture, but also how Marylanders have impacted space travel, study, and innovation.

In addition to offering engaging field trip experiences (digitally and in-person), we want your students to be a part of the exhibit.

Please share your students’ artwork so that we can highlight how Maryland children imagine space today. Inspired by the Personal Preference Kits packed by astronauts traveling to the International Space Station, we invite your students to ponder traveling to space and creatively respond to the question “What would you bring with you to space?” Your students’ contribution might be featured in our upcoming exhibit!


Share

Share your students’ artwork with us!
Please submit artwork by August 30, 2020.

Mail artwork to:

The Jewish Museum of Maryland
15 Lloyd Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
Attn: Paige Woodhouse

Or email photos to Paige at pwoodhouse@jewishmuseummd.org

*Make sure to include your name, age, and list of items (and why) with your artwork.


Find Inspiration 

Encourage Creativity! Students can draw, paint, photograph, or cut and paste their responses to the question “What would you bring to space?” Using this downloadable template, students can work independently, or collaborate with others, to create their artwork.

For inspiration, check out some submissions below:

Tucker, Age 7

Tucker wanted to bring things from his bedroom that would make him feel comfortable. He chose his blanket and pillow, stuffed dog, Spiderman alarm clock, and slippers.

With the help of his mom, Tucker took a photo with his items. He cut and glued shapes to make the sky for his rocketship.

 

Aliceanna, Age 4

Aliceanna chose to bring her favorite noodles, swirly noodles; a beautiful dancing dress because she likes to be fancy; and a glue stick. She also packed her best friend Monsieur Croc and the bear, Aloysius, “to keep Monsieur Croc company.”

She (with a little help from her mom) used glue, construction paper, and crayons.

Azreal, Age 10

“I would want to bring my blanket and my stuffed animal to keep me comfortable. I would bring my camera, diary, and music player.”

Azreal used lot of materials in creating her packing list. She used markers, glitter, yarn, paint, and pencil.


Plan For Next Year!
Jews in Space: Members of the Tribe in Orbit 
Coming this Fall to JMM

This exhibit explores the lives of people who have studied, imagined, and even traveled to the cosmos with an emphasis on the contributions of the Jewish community to those efforts.


For more posts from Paige Woodhouse, click here.

For more education newsletters, click here.


Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Fashion Statement: Students as Storytellers Part 2

Posted on April 11th, 2019 by

This post was written by JMM School Program Coordinator Paige Woodhouse. To read more posts from Paige, click here!


(This is Part 2 of a two-part blog post about the latest education programs offered at the Jewish Museum of Maryland for our special exhibits: Stitching History from the Holocaust and Fashion Statement. Missed Part 1? You can check it out here.)


At the Jewish Museum of Maryland, we are stories tellers. We are also storyfinders, storykeepers, and storyprotectors. We are finding new stories all the time. Our current special exhibit, Fashion Statement, is composed of items of clothing that tell stories about their wearers.

During their recent visit, students from John Ruhrah Elementary Middle School had the opportunity to become storytellers. Thinking critically and creatively, they worked in small groups to create stories about the clothing items on display in Fashion Statement.

Students from John Ruhrah’s 7th grade work together to complete their puzzle.

Piecing together a puzzle is like piecing together the story of an object. As each new fact is discovered, another piece of the puzzle falls into place, eventually revealing the whole picture. The 6th to 8th-grade students started with a puzzle. Working together as a team, they completed the puzzle to reveal an item of clothing from the exhibit.

Students made observations about their item of clothing in the exhibit.

After locating their item in the exhibit, students made observations about it. Taking their cue from Nancy Patz’ book “Who Was the Woman Who Wore the Hat?” students asked questions that a researcher would ask when trying to learn more about an object in a Museum. What is the clothing item? What material, or materials, is it made of? Who wore it? Why do you think someone would wear this specific item? Why was it chosen to be on display by the Museum?

Students used their observations and questions about their object to write stories.

Then, mimicking the rhythmic lyrics of Nancy Patz’ book, students worked together to complete fill-in-the-blank stories for their items. Who was the person who wore the (blank) coat? What was she like? Was she (Blank)?

Students thought about what questions they would want to ask the owner of the item. They came up with questions like: “Why did you put your name on it? Why this color? Where was it made? Was it comfortable?”

Taking an active role as the storyteller, students were empowered to think about what clothing represents. In the case of Stitching History from the Holocaust (see Part 1), clothing was a means for survival and representative of a talent lost to the world. In Fashion Statement, clothing is a way to express your identity.

At the end of the visit, students considered: What can we learn about people through their clothing? What can’t we learn about people from their clothing? What does clothing mean to you?

I encourage you to think about these questions as you visit Fashion Statement and explore how Jewish Marylanders, and all human beings, use clothing as one of the ways we assert who we are.

Thank you to the 6th to 8th-graders at John Ruhrah Elementary Middle School for visiting the Jewish Museum of Maryland this spring. If you are interested in bringing your school, summer camp, or group, please contact Paige Woodhouse, School Program Coordinator, at pwoodhouse@jewishmuseummd.org or 443-873-5167.


Not all stories fit on a label in an exhibit. Looking to learn more about some of the items on display? Check out some “extras” here.


 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Stitching History from the Holocaust: Students as Storytellers Part 1

Posted on April 10th, 2019 by

This post was written by JMM School Program Coordinator Paige Woodhouse. To read more posts from Paige, click here!


(This is Part 1 of a two-part blog post about the latest education programs offered at the Jewish Museum of Maryland for our special exhibits: Stitching History from the Holocaust and Fashion Statement. You can check out part two tomorrow!)


At the Jewish Museum of Maryland, we are stories tellers. We are also storyfinders, storykeepers, and storyprotectors.

We are thrilled to share the poignant story found in Stitching History from the Holocaust on loan to us from the Jewish Museum Milwaukee. This exhibit brings to life the dress designs by Hedy Strnad, who perished in the Holocaust. In doing so, the exhibit aims for visitors to see that each victim of the Holocaust has their own story that deserves to be remembered.

When students from John Ruhrah Elementary Middle School visited this week, they did not just hear the story of Hedy Strnad but took a behind-the-scenes look at how this story came to be.

Many stories begin with a question, a discovery, or someone’s desire to know something more. In the case of Stitching History from the Holocaust, the story began with the discovery by Burton Strnad of a red envelope containing a handwritten letter, a black and white photograph, and eight dress designs. Burton Strnad gave these items to the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee, who then began to piece together the story behind the couple in the photography, Hedy and Paul Strnad.

6th-grade students from John Ruhrah taking a close look at the dresses on display in Stitching History from the Holocaust, on loan to us from the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee.

Sometimes stories don’t begin with just one question. They begin with lots of questions. Students stepped into the shoes of Burton Strnad and the staff at the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee. Imagining they made this discovery, students pondered what would they want to know about these items and the people that they belonged to? Students came up with the questions: Who were the people in the photograph? What did they do? What happened to them? Where did they come from? Are they related to me? How did the letter get there? Who made the dress designs?

Students thought about how they would find the answers to their questions. They could talk to family members, search on the internet, go to the library or a museum. All great ideas (especially the Museum suggestion).

Hedy and Paul’s story is told using dresses that were fabricated from the designs found by Burton Strnad. Students discussed how the dresses represent a family’s attempt for survival. They represent a profession. A talent. An individual. They are a memorial for someone’s talent and potential that was lost because of the Holocaust. They allow Hedy and Paul’s story to live on and pass from generation to generation.

The story of Hedy and Paul is still being uncovered by the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee. As new pieces of information are discovered, the Museum is able to fill in the blanks. Students considered what else they wonder about the dresses and the Strnad family. Students asked: How did Hedy and Paul die? How old was Hedy? Are there any traces of her dress shop? Are there other designs or photos? How long did it take to make the dresses?

Students working with JMM Educator Marisa to think about what they would still like to know after learning about Hedy and Paul Strnad.

Exhibits are three-dimensional storytelling environments that you can move through and interact with. Unlike the paperbound novels that students are reading in class, an exhibit immerses them in the narrative. The dresses on display in Stitching History from the Holocaust do just that. They bring to life the Strnad family’s story and allowed students a behind-the-scenes exploration of how Museum’s tell important stories. Finally, the exhibit and the dresses don’t answer all the questions, but left students inspired to find out more.


Find out how students created their own stories about clothing items on display in the JMM-original exhibit Fashion Statement, in the next blog post, Fashion Statement: Students as Storytellers Part 2 (publishing on April 11, 2019).


 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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