Introducing Our 2016 Summer Interns!

Posted on June 9th, 2016 by

We are so pleased to welcome this summer’s Interns to the Museum! This cohort has spent their week learning about the Museum and diving into their intern projects. You’ll be hearing from them throughout the summer as they explore the world of Museums and the Jewish Museum of Maryland in particular. Below they have kindly introduced themselves in their own words.


 

Who Am I?

My name is Rachel Morin and I am an Education Intern at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. I grew up in Owings Mills, MD, but I moved to Philadelphia when I was 18 to study at Temple University. I double major in Visual Studies and Advertising and, no, I could not tell you what I want to be when I grow up yet, but I am slowly learning that not knowing is “okay”.  That is why I am here; in fact, I had no idea that this is what I would end up doing with my summer. I saw an opportunity and applied for the Exhibitions internship position, but somehow got put into the Education group. I am not sure how this occurred, but I decided to go for it anyway, because any experience builds up your knowledge base, and who am I to deny myself that? As you can see, I love to learn, so that is all I really want from this experience. I hope to be able to apply my experiences and new knowledge to future jobs and I am excited to work with programming and learn what goes into the process of creating community-based projects.

(Day 1: Seems promising… )

(Day 1: Seems promising… )

A little about me; I went to George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology where I spent most of my time being trained in the traditional styles of drawing and painting and needless to say it made a big impact. I love to paint surreal imagery and dissect dreams and the human psyche. I am currently trying to transfer my passion to a more digital setting through the practice of Photoshop and Illustrator. Additionally, I love cats, yes really, traveling and tea. I am on my way to becoming a tea connoisseur. Try the Milk Oolong from Capital Teas. You’re welcome.


An official ID

An official ID

I’m Alice Wynd, one of this summer’s exhibitions interns! I am going to be a senior at the University of Rochester, but I grew up in Towson, immersed in Baltimore and Maryland culture. When I’m not writing or reading about history, I love to watch movies, play tabletop games, and listen to Hamilton.

During the past two summers, I worked at an archaeological dig in Bermuda, where I had the opportunity to excavate and catalogue artifacts from as early as the 17th century. While I was working in Bermuda, I had the opportunity to lead public tours and design exhibits for our sites, which showed me the importance of presenting our findings to the public. This sparked my interest in museum work, which brought me to the Jewish Museum of Maryland this summer!

This summer, I hope to learn the basics of curatorial work, from the principles of exhibit design to navigating the museum software, and gain an understanding of the process required to create a new exhibit from scratch. Hopefully, I’ll also get to see some cool artifacts!


 

Live from Jonestown, It’s Emilia Halvorsen!

I’m Emilia, and as one of the Exhibitions Interns here at the JMM, it seemed only right to make a formal introduction. I was born and raised in Baltimore City, and have really loved my experiences here- there’s always something to do, and there’s something really special about the Baltimore community, which I first began to appreciate after seeing the community come together and mobilize following the Baltimore Uprising. Before College, I attended Friends School from K-12. Now I attend Brown University, where I just finished my freshman year. In my free time I enjoy singing jazz, writing, and neglecting my gym membership. I also have an affinity for big earrings and fresh sushi. When I’m not working at the Jewish Museum, you can find me scooping Baltimore’s best ice cream at the Charmery in Hampden.

A super natural, very candid me making myself at home in my new cubicle.

A super natural, very candid me making myself at home in my new cubicle.

I am super excited to be part of the Jewish Museum team this summer. Museums have been the backdrops of some of my most special childhood memories, moments of awe and appreciation shared between me and my family. I really believe in the value of museums and the mission of the Jewish Museum of Maryland in particular, so I look forward to getting to know more about how museums operate, and to contribute to the behind the scenes work. The exhibitions internship seemed perfect for me, combining my passion for museums with my interest in anthropology. I can already tell it’s going to be a challenging summer, but also a rewarding one. I hope to look back at the end and see that I’ve gained important skills and made strong connections.


Beginning my Time at the JMM

My name is Oscar Cade Simon; I am the digital projects intern at the Jewish Museum of Maryland for the summer of 2016. I am new to the east coast and have lived in northern Baltimore for around five years now. Originally I hail from the Bay area on the west coast.  Currently outside of work I am a sophomore at the University of Maryland Baltimore County with an Animation major. I went to high school at the Baltimore School for the Arts in Mt. Vernon for all four previous years.

Living in Baltimore has been an interesting experience for me, as the Jewish Museum of Maryland demonstrates there is a plethora of history and information contained in every neighborhood of the city. I hope to learn more about the various waves of immigrants that settled in Baltimore and the changing social conditions that facilitated areas to become what they are today. The JMM presents a unique opportunity to combine my knowledge of media arts with history in a professional, interesting and visitor friendly way. This summer I hope to help digitize some of the Museum’s research and work so that it can be accessed on the internet where it is not subject to decay and change, and more importantly can be accessed by anyone. My goal is to ensure a legacy and prominent online presence for the JMM so that everyone can share in the history of Jonestown and the Jewish experience in Baltimore as a whole. I want to be able to gain new skills and insight into the lives of the people that inhabited Baltimore.

Me in my workspace, in front of this very blog post.

Me in my workspace, in front of this very blog post.


Hello, my name is Anna Balfanz. I’m from Baltimore, Maryland and currently studying Anthropology and Environmental Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. At the end of April, I found myself staring at my computer screen, half procrastinating for finals and half desperately searching for a summer internship that would

  1. Teach me new skills
  2. Relate to my major
  3. Fill my time – And –
  4. Be something I genuinely enjoyed

I went on to internships.com, a known savior of college students searching for a way to spend their summer productively. After quickly scrolling past a million “marketing” internships, I abruptly stopped when my eyes caught about five different internships for the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

I’ve gone to a Jewish day school for twelve years, thirteen if you count pre-school. Classes such as Hebrew, Bible, and Jewish History alongside Calculus, AP Environmental Science, and English Literature filled up a normal day. Of course, that changed when I entered college. While I felt ready to move away from a heavy focus on Judaics and pursue my own interests, I found myself really missing Judaism. Sukkot would pass during midterm week and I’d end up never stepping foot in a sukkah, or I would find that it was Purim a few hours before I needed to rush to the Megillah reading. I knew I wanted to re-connect to this part of me, but with such a busy schedule, I wasn’t sure how.

Me, Intently searching for the perfect internship

Me, Intently searching for the perfect internship

After reading a brief description, I quickly knew that an Education and Program Internship at JMM could not only hit all of my bullet points but also solve this problem. This summer, I’m excited to learn tangible skills such as leading tour guides, writing educational programs for museums, putting together exhibits, and promoting a museum. I also hope that I learn to think about museums from a different perspective, form close relationships with the other interns, and don’t feel too exhausted after spending ten weeks alternating between this and volunteering at the SPCA (I found a way to fill my summer!). All in all, I’m incredibly excited for the chance to work in this museum. It connects me back to Judaism, gives me practical experience working with the museum-side of anthropology, and provides me with a warm, welcoming environmental in which to spend my time. Let’s get started! 


 

Typing errors corrected below!

Typing errors corrected below!

Hello! My name is David Roth Agronin, and I hail from Owings Mills, MD. I am a twenty one year old male and an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where I study philosophy and specialized in ethics and metaphysics.

I decided to intern at the Jewish Museum because I want to gain experience working at a non-profit, because I one day wish to go into law with regard to non-profits and/or non-governmental organizations. I also think that the Jewish Museum, because of its history and the history of the Jewish people has a lot to do with overcoming oppression and striving for social justice, which is something I am passionate about and which I think is a major problem in our society today. The Jewish Museum is a logical jumping off point for me to start a career aimed at improving social justice, especially within the city of Baltimore.

This summer I am also working at a Thai restaurant as a line cook and am hoping to use both of these opportunities to gain experience and a more intimate knowledge of my hometown, Baltimore.

Sincerely,

David Roth Agronin

Education Intern

Esquire

P.S. I am thoroughly enjoying using this typewriter and would like to inquire as to its price for potential purchase.


Ben

Ben

Hello! My name is Ben Snyder, I am a rising senior at Towson University where I study Secondary Education with a focus in History. I have lived in Baltimore my entire life and I attended Beth El Synagogue. I graduated from Pikesville High in 2013 where I took Multimedia classes and was the Cross Country team Captain.

I decided to intern at the museum to improve my knowledge and expertise in history. I am very much looking forward to working with the JMM staff as well as the other interns.


Gina’s First Week

Posing at the Museum's entrance gates

Posing at the Museum’s entrance gates

Hi, I’m Gina Crosby, one of the newest Collections interns here at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  I’m originally from Rochester, NY, but am currently a senior studying history and museums at Johns Hopkins University here in Baltimore, MD.  Recently, I studied abroad-four whole months!- in Morocco to practice my Arabic language skills and experience a new culture.  I loved every second of traveling and living internationally, and being able to truly immerse myself in a whole different way of life.

This summer, I’m excited to be working in the Collections Department at the JMM.  I’ve been interested in and studying museums for several years now at Hopkins, because I believe that museums are a great way to combine community outreach and historical research, two things I’m very passionate about.  I chose to work within Collections because I love being so hands-on with history, both by working with artifacts as well as through the collecting process.  I’m seriously considering a future career in museums, and I’m hoping that this summer will not only give me valuable experience in the museums field but also give me insight into my future career path.  I’m looking forward to a great summer of learning and collecting!


It's official!

It’s official!

My name is Becky and I am the current Public History Intern at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. I am a rising senior History Major at Salisbury University, but will be studying abroad at Stirling University in Scotland this fall. I love to travel both internationally and within the United States. In fact during the winter of my sophomore year, I spent three weeks in Rome attending a theatre class and enjoyed every minute. At the end of the summer I have the opportunity to spend a week in Alaska with my family. I am always ready to go somewhere new and exciting.

This opportunity at the Jewish Museum of Maryland is a wonderful chance for me to explore museum work. As the Public History Intern, I will be working with others to document the history of the lives of the Jewish population. I enjoy connecting with others and am excited to listen to their stories. Through this internship, I hope to gain increased knowledge of the inner workings of the museum and grow to understand what it means to be a museum professional.


Greetings From Tamara Schlossenberg

Tamara

Tamara

Hello. I am a recent graduate from Hood College with a bachelor’s in Archaeology and a minor in French. Currently I reside in Owings Mills, but grew up in Reisterstown just to the North West, where I am still very active in the local community. I currently am assisting my mom with the preparations for the Reisterstown farmers market. On my weekends I reenact the Civil War and participate in living histories telling about Maryland’s role in the War Between the States. In October I’m going to be relocating to Denver, CO for ten months for a position with AmeriCorps to do various community service projects.

I have had a lifelong passion for history and material culture, so working in a museum is a great way to work with both of those. I did an internship at the National Civil War Medicine Museum in Frederick, MD this past spring and loved it. I have wanted to intern at some of the museums in Baltimore for a while now as we have so many great museums and I just really enjoy being Downtown.  As much as I enjoy doing archaeological fieldwork, museum work gives me and opportunity to present history to the public and share my interests. Through this summer I hope to gain additional museum experience and gain an idea of what I want to major in graduate school.

To read  more posts by and about interns click HERE.

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Noshes, Pick-Me-Ups and Feasts at the JMM

Posted on July 29th, 2015 by

Probably anyone who knows me well would characterize me as a “foodie.” I find experimenting with new (and retakes on old) recipes a thrill, I’m always on the lookout for an unfamiliar and exotic restaurant to try (if you’re wondering, that Burmese restaurant in Silver Spring is a delight), and my Instagram is basically just a receptacle of photos of things I’ve eaten, and the far too many food magazines and bloggers I follow.

If my life didn’t already entirely revolve around food before my internship at the JMM, my condensed work schedule here has made matters even worse (or better—I’m going to go with better). Because I commute from DC, my supervisors have kindly allowed me to get in my weekly 30 hours in three days instead of five. This is fantastic, but requires a little bit more organization on my part. Actually, it really doesn’t—it just means that all of my Monday-Wednesday meals, snacks, coffee breaks and ‘I-can’t-stare-at-a-computer-anymore-without-chocolate’s take place on the premises or in the surrounding neighborhood. Fortunately for me, everyone at the JMM seems to share in my culinary enthusiasm (though, perhaps with not such intense dedication).

So as my time here comes to a close, I thought it might be nice to document the ins-and-outs of noshing here at the JMM.

#1 in everyone’s heart: the candy basket.

#1 in everyone’s heart: the candy basket.

Interns Carmen and Rachel search for the best candy choices.

Searching for the best choices.

Home to assorted chocolates, starbursts, peppermint patties, and a brief but highly unfortunate period of smarties, the candy basket sits in the main work room and provides solace to interns and full-time staff alike. It’s best to make the rounds early—Special Dark chocolates seem to disappear quickly. Just speculating here, but this may be due to the fact that certain interns horde them in their cubicles… you know who you are.

#2 Bowl of Desperation

#2 Bowl of Desperation

When the candy basket is empty (and there were QUITE a few days in June when this was the case)—there is always, for those that dare, the nondescript plastic container that sits directly next to the candy basket.

I actually think it has held the exact same number of generic sugar candies since the day I started– minus one. There was that one day when I was tempted, and then instantly regretted it.

#3 The Kitchen Table

#3 The Kitchen Table

Where all of our more substantial meals take place. Most of us generally bring our lunch and eat together (for those of you who regularly follow the JMM blog, you may remember my confuddling grits debacle).

The table is empty right now, but once in a while leftovers from events will appear here (or even delectable homemade rugelach from library volunteer Judy—you rock Judy!) There were also a couple of days where bland, and probably week-old, popcorn was deposited on the table. Not sure what that was about, but not to worry, we took it off your hands.

#4 The Fridge

#4 The Fridge

I’ve seen a few cluttered office refrigerators in my day—but the JMM fridge definitely takes the cake (pun is SO intended—sometimes there actually is cake). On any given day here, there are at least 6 of us interns, a handful of volunteers and board members, and all of the full-time staff. I’ve actually never had a problem locating my leftovers of whatever Ottolenghi recipe I’ve made the night before, but things do, inevitably, get a little crowded. Sometimes though, when you mention to (read: whine to) Intern Wrangler Rachel about how hungry you are around 5pm, she’ll inform you that there are snacks in fridge in the form of awesome homemade chicken taco fixins and mango-jalapeño salsa. You’re my hero, Rachel.

Finally, with our prime location right on Corn Beef Row and just a short trot away from Little Italy, I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a shout out to our favorite local eateries.

#1 on our list: Pâtisserie Poupon

#1 on our list: Pâtisserie Poupon

Sampling delicious macarons

Sampling delicious macarons

Some of our favorites here include: the macarons, chocolate croissants and chocolate soufflés, a delightful chocolate mousse cake that we don’t know the name of, chocolate chip cookies, any of the fruit tarts and, the quiche. We come here a lot. With an excellent array of coffee drinks and a lovely staff, how could you not?

#2: Attman’s Deli

#2: Attman’s Deli

I don’t think I need to explain this to anyone who lives in Baltimore– or who doesn’t, but is seeing these photos.

A familiar sandwich site...

A familiar sandwich site…

Finally, today we had one last hurrah in Little Italy with all of the interns (minus Sophia—we missed you!) and decided that our restaurant list warranted one final shout-out:

#3: Amiccis

#3: Amiccis

Look at the size of that bowl!

Look at the size of that bowl!

They might characterize themselves as a “very casual eatery” but they mean business with the food. These are the lunch portions. I think intern Rachel could actually fit inside her bowl quite comfortably.

Between our office kitchen lunches and various culinary field trips, we’ve shared some really great meals together, and a lot of laughs. Thanks for everything, JMM. It’s been a real treat.

IMG_0999A blog post by Exhibitions Intern Elizabeth Livesey. To read more posts by interns click HERE.

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Sum-Sum Summertime!

Posted on June 3rd, 2015 by

Memorial Day is officially behind us and that means it’s summertime!  I read recently that Maryland beaches are probably some of the best in the country, surrounded by water from both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean.  There are so many vantage points throughout the state where one can see beautiful sunsets.

Capturing the View

Capturing the View

Last weekend, my hubby and I went on a “road trip” to the Eastern shore. We did not take our usual path across the Bay Bridge.  Instead, we headed north to Chesapeake City in Cecil County and then drove directly south through the counties on the eastern shore along the Chesapeake Bay.  I had a mission in mind, I wanted to see the infamous, Tolchester Beach, the place where many spent hot summer days in the late 19th and early 20th century.  In its hey-day, Tolchester was a beach destination that had had hotels, restaurants, and games, picnics, horse-racing and an amusement park with a merry-go-round and a roller coaster. The steamship lines ran from 1877 through the early 1950’s to Tolchester until the construction of the Bay Bridge, enabling people to cross the Chesapeake by car.

Welcome to Tolchester!

Welcome to Tolchester!

I first heard about Tolchester Beach in one of the monologues of Ida Rehr, one of the JMM’s living history performances.  According to Ida Rehr, you could only get to Tolchester in the early days by steamship ferries that crossed the Chesapeake Bay. Part of Ida’s story includes reminiscing about the picnic lunch that she took on the trip – fried chicken wrapped in waxed paper.

I asked my own relatives if they recalled going to Tolchester.  My Aunt Naomi recalled that she along with my father and grandparents went to Tolchester many times.  They would leave in the morning and come back home around dark.  Aunt Naomi recalled my grandparents rushing in the car to get to the docks on Pratt Street, so not to miss the ferry. My grandmother loved the trip on the ferry and always prepared a picnic lunch for the day trip to the eastern shore.  The trip took about an hour.  My aunt recalled the sandy beaches, even though she was not allowed to go swimming.  She also remembered that my grandmother broke her wrist when she slipped on the deck of the ferry because of the rain.

From the Museum Collections - Edward Rosenfeld’s relatives at the Tolchester beach, c. 1935. JMM 2000.72.29

From the Museum Collections – Edward Rosenfeld’s relatives at the Tolchester beach, c. 1935. JMM 2000.72.29

Today, Tolchester Beach is just a memory and there is nothing visible that would allow one to imagine the vibrant place that it was during the 19th and 20th centuries. .  From the eastern shore, one can see the western shore’s skyline making Baltimore, Middle River and Dundalk seem like such a short distance away.  Today, there is a marina at Tolchester along with a tiki bar.  There were people on the beach enjoying the views.  In fact, I was not the only person trying to imagine the place of yesteryear. I met a friend from high school (who I had not seen in 40 years).  She and her hubby took their speedboat to Tolchester for the day.  She had also heard about Tolchester back in its hey-day and was looking for sea glass, hoping to find some beautiful treasures along the eastern shores of the Chesapeake.

Ilene and Deborah

Ilene and Deborah

We had a great day trip we had and I loved seeing and learning about Tolchester Beach!  Definitely worth the trip!

ileneA blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more posts by Ilene click HERE.

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