Noshes, Pick-Me-Ups and Feasts at the JMM

Posted on July 29th, 2015 by

Probably anyone who knows me well would characterize me as a “foodie.” I find experimenting with new (and retakes on old) recipes a thrill, I’m always on the lookout for an unfamiliar and exotic restaurant to try (if you’re wondering, that Burmese restaurant in Silver Spring is a delight), and my Instagram is basically just a receptacle of photos of things I’ve eaten, and the far too many food magazines and bloggers I follow.

If my life didn’t already entirely revolve around food before my internship at the JMM, my condensed work schedule here has made matters even worse (or better—I’m going to go with better). Because I commute from DC, my supervisors have kindly allowed me to get in my weekly 30 hours in three days instead of five. This is fantastic, but requires a little bit more organization on my part. Actually, it really doesn’t—it just means that all of my Monday-Wednesday meals, snacks, coffee breaks and ‘I-can’t-stare-at-a-computer-anymore-without-chocolate’s take place on the premises or in the surrounding neighborhood. Fortunately for me, everyone at the JMM seems to share in my culinary enthusiasm (though, perhaps with not such intense dedication).

So as my time here comes to a close, I thought it might be nice to document the ins-and-outs of noshing here at the JMM.

#1 in everyone’s heart: the candy basket.

#1 in everyone’s heart: the candy basket.

Interns Carmen and Rachel search for the best candy choices.

Searching for the best choices.

Home to assorted chocolates, starbursts, peppermint patties, and a brief but highly unfortunate period of smarties, the candy basket sits in the main work room and provides solace to interns and full-time staff alike. It’s best to make the rounds early—Special Dark chocolates seem to disappear quickly. Just speculating here, but this may be due to the fact that certain interns horde them in their cubicles… you know who you are.

#2 Bowl of Desperation

#2 Bowl of Desperation

When the candy basket is empty (and there were QUITE a few days in June when this was the case)—there is always, for those that dare, the nondescript plastic container that sits directly next to the candy basket.

I actually think it has held the exact same number of generic sugar candies since the day I started– minus one. There was that one day when I was tempted, and then instantly regretted it.

#3 The Kitchen Table

#3 The Kitchen Table

Where all of our more substantial meals take place. Most of us generally bring our lunch and eat together (for those of you who regularly follow the JMM blog, you may remember my confuddling grits debacle).

The table is empty right now, but once in a while leftovers from events will appear here (or even delectable homemade rugelach from library volunteer Judy—you rock Judy!) There were also a couple of days where bland, and probably week-old, popcorn was deposited on the table. Not sure what that was about, but not to worry, we took it off your hands.

#4 The Fridge

#4 The Fridge

I’ve seen a few cluttered office refrigerators in my day—but the JMM fridge definitely takes the cake (pun is SO intended—sometimes there actually is cake). On any given day here, there are at least 6 of us interns, a handful of volunteers and board members, and all of the full-time staff. I’ve actually never had a problem locating my leftovers of whatever Ottolenghi recipe I’ve made the night before, but things do, inevitably, get a little crowded. Sometimes though, when you mention to (read: whine to) Intern Wrangler Rachel about how hungry you are around 5pm, she’ll inform you that there are snacks in fridge in the form of awesome homemade chicken taco fixins and mango-jalapeño salsa. You’re my hero, Rachel.

Finally, with our prime location right on Corn Beef Row and just a short trot away from Little Italy, I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a shout out to our favorite local eateries.

#1 on our list: Pâtisserie Poupon

#1 on our list: Pâtisserie Poupon

Sampling delicious macarons

Sampling delicious macarons

Some of our favorites here include: the macarons, chocolate croissants and chocolate soufflés, a delightful chocolate mousse cake that we don’t know the name of, chocolate chip cookies, any of the fruit tarts and, the quiche. We come here a lot. With an excellent array of coffee drinks and a lovely staff, how could you not?

#2: Attman’s Deli

#2: Attman’s Deli

I don’t think I need to explain this to anyone who lives in Baltimore– or who doesn’t, but is seeing these photos.

A familiar sandwich site...

A familiar sandwich site…

Finally, today we had one last hurrah in Little Italy with all of the interns (minus Sophia—we missed you!) and decided that our restaurant list warranted one final shout-out:

#3: Amiccis

#3: Amiccis

Look at the size of that bowl!

Look at the size of that bowl!

They might characterize themselves as a “very casual eatery” but they mean business with the food. These are the lunch portions. I think intern Rachel could actually fit inside her bowl quite comfortably.

Between our office kitchen lunches and various culinary field trips, we’ve shared some really great meals together, and a lot of laughs. Thanks for everything, JMM. It’s been a real treat.

IMG_0999A blog post by Exhibitions Intern Elizabeth Livesey. To read more posts by interns click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Sum-Sum Summertime!

Posted on June 3rd, 2015 by

Memorial Day is officially behind us and that means it’s summertime!  I read recently that Maryland beaches are probably some of the best in the country, surrounded by water from both the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean.  There are so many vantage points throughout the state where one can see beautiful sunsets.

Capturing the View

Capturing the View

Last weekend, my hubby and I went on a “road trip” to the Eastern shore. We did not take our usual path across the Bay Bridge.  Instead, we headed north to Chesapeake City in Cecil County and then drove directly south through the counties on the eastern shore along the Chesapeake Bay.  I had a mission in mind, I wanted to see the infamous, Tolchester Beach, the place where many spent hot summer days in the late 19th and early 20th century.  In its hey-day, Tolchester was a beach destination that had had hotels, restaurants, and games, picnics, horse-racing and an amusement park with a merry-go-round and a roller coaster. The steamship lines ran from 1877 through the early 1950’s to Tolchester until the construction of the Bay Bridge, enabling people to cross the Chesapeake by car.

Welcome to Tolchester!

Welcome to Tolchester!

I first heard about Tolchester Beach in one of the monologues of Ida Rehr, one of the JMM’s living history performances.  According to Ida Rehr, you could only get to Tolchester in the early days by steamship ferries that crossed the Chesapeake Bay. Part of Ida’s story includes reminiscing about the picnic lunch that she took on the trip – fried chicken wrapped in waxed paper.

I asked my own relatives if they recalled going to Tolchester.  My Aunt Naomi recalled that she along with my father and grandparents went to Tolchester many times.  They would leave in the morning and come back home around dark.  Aunt Naomi recalled my grandparents rushing in the car to get to the docks on Pratt Street, so not to miss the ferry. My grandmother loved the trip on the ferry and always prepared a picnic lunch for the day trip to the eastern shore.  The trip took about an hour.  My aunt recalled the sandy beaches, even though she was not allowed to go swimming.  She also remembered that my grandmother broke her wrist when she slipped on the deck of the ferry because of the rain.

From the Museum Collections - Edward Rosenfeld’s relatives at the Tolchester beach, c. 1935. JMM 2000.72.29

From the Museum Collections – Edward Rosenfeld’s relatives at the Tolchester beach, c. 1935. JMM 2000.72.29

Today, Tolchester Beach is just a memory and there is nothing visible that would allow one to imagine the vibrant place that it was during the 19th and 20th centuries. .  From the eastern shore, one can see the western shore’s skyline making Baltimore, Middle River and Dundalk seem like such a short distance away.  Today, there is a marina at Tolchester along with a tiki bar.  There were people on the beach enjoying the views.  In fact, I was not the only person trying to imagine the place of yesteryear. I met a friend from high school (who I had not seen in 40 years).  She and her hubby took their speedboat to Tolchester for the day.  She had also heard about Tolchester back in its hey-day and was looking for sea glass, hoping to find some beautiful treasures along the eastern shores of the Chesapeake.

Ilene and Deborah

Ilene and Deborah

We had a great day trip we had and I loved seeing and learning about Tolchester Beach!  Definitely worth the trip!

ileneA blog post by Education Director Ilene Dackman-Alon. To read more posts by Ilene click HERE.

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Arielle’s Top Three Things About Working at the Jewish Museum of Maryland

Posted on August 6th, 2014 by

When recalling this past summer and reflecting on all of my experiences interning at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, I cannot believe where all the time has gone – it has certainly gone by quick.  As I begin my last few weeks as an Education and Programming intern at the JMM, I certainly have a lot to reflect on.

If I could make a numbered list of the top three things about working at the JMM it would probably go like this:

Arielle’s Top Three Things About Working at the Jewish Museum of Maryland

Number 3:  Getting to know Jewish Baltimore

For me, one of the best parts of working at the JMM has been learning about Baltimore’s Jewish history.  Before I began this internship, I literally knew nothing about Baltimore Jewish history, except that the city had one.  I tell my co-interns all the time how it’s funny that although I’ve lived in Baltimore for two years studying at Johns Hopkins, there was so much I didn’t know about the city that I lived in or the Jewish people that called it home.  From the immigration story beginning at Locust point, to the once booming Corned Beef Row on Lombard Street, to the amazing stories of the museum’s two historic synagogues, there’s certainly a lot to learn about Baltimore and its fascinating Jewish history. I’ve had the pleasure to learn a lot!  Getting to know Baltimore has certainly been a highlight of this summer for me and I can’t wait to keep learning more.

It was awesome getting to know one of Baltimore’s most amazing Jewish residents, the AH-Mazing Mendes Cohen! What an interesting Baltimorean with an amazing story.  Be sure to check out the JMM’s new exhibit about him this fall.

It was awesome getting to know one of Baltimore’s most amazing Jewish residents, the AH-Mazing Mendes Cohen! What an interesting Baltimorean with an amazing story. Be sure to check out the JMM’s new exhibit about him this fall.

Number 2: Getting to know the Staff, Volunteers, and Interns

In my past seven weeks at the JMM, I have loved getting to know all of the members of the hard working staff, volunteers, and interns.  The staff at this museum is truly incredible.  When you look at all the work they do, and the cheerful attitude they maintain while doing it, you are reminded that you are in an atmosphere of not only professionals, but people passionate about telling the Baltimore Jewish story.  I absolutely loved working in the Education Department’s “West Wing” and I know that I am walking away not just with fond memories, but also with important skills and many lessons learned. The staff at the JMM has been so welcoming and kind and I have learned a great deal just by working with them all.

Although sadly we didn’t have Abby to join us in this picture, I am especially thankful to Ilene and Trillion and the rest of the Education Department for welcoming us to the JMM and giving Emma and me such a great summer.

Although sadly we didn’t have Abby to join us in this picture, I am especially thankful to Ilene and Trillion and the rest of the Education Department for welcoming us to the JMM and giving Emma and me such a great summer.

Moreover, to the volunteers, I am inspired by your commitment to the museum and time put in, and I have loved getting to know you all.  To Lois and Wendy, thanks for being amazing teachers when it came to giving tours and thank you for all of your kindness.  Also, to my co-interns, you girls all rock.  You guys are seriously the best group of interns a girl could ask to work with and I’ve loved getting to know each of you and wish you the best in your future endeavors.

Intern Emma and I playing dress up one morning.  We dressed up as Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln using costumes from last year’s exhibit on the civil war.  Even interns can be silly sometimes.

Intern Emma and I playing dress up one morning. We dressed up as Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln using costumes from last year’s exhibit on the civil war. Even interns can be silly sometimes.

Lastly, Number 1:  Getting to know the JMM visitors

For me the best part of working at the Jewish Museum of Maryland has been working with museum visitors.  The experiences of the visitors are the reason that all of the staff and volunteers at the museum work as hard as they do.  They are the reason that museums exist!  Highlights for me have been getting to know the student camp groups that came in all throughout June and July. The students were lovely, curious, and always excited to learn.  I particularly loved showing them the Electrified Pickle exhibit – an exhibit that both I and my co-intern Emma helped put together.  Another highlight was helping coordinate the logistics and attending the JMM’s Summer Teachers Institute for Holocaust Educators.  I must thank Deborah for including me in this amazing program and I loved meeting so many educators of the Holocaust and learning about this history alongside them.  I hope that while spreading the important meaning of the Holocaust to their own students, these teachers will bring their students to the JMM where they can learn even further about the history of the Jewish people.

Folders given to all teachers attending the STI program

Folders given to all teachers attending the STI program

An example I made for students during an activity connected to the Electrified Pickle exhibit.  The students loved playing with the play dough and LED lights – plus they learned about conductive and insulating electricity!

An example I made for students during an activity connected to the Electrified Pickle exhibit. The students loved playing with the play dough and LED lights – plus they learned about conductive and insulating electricity!

Anyways, thanks so much for reading.  Thank you Jewish Museum of Maryland for giving me such a wonderful summer and I know that these last three weeks of my internship are going to speed by quick.

All the best,

Arielle

I took this photo on my first day on the job when I excitedly arrived at the JMM.  I can’t believe it’s already been nine weeks since that point – time flies when you’re having a good time.

I took this photo on my first day on the job when I excitedly arrived at the JMM. I can’t believe it’s already been nine weeks since that point – time flies when you’re having a good time.

Arielle KadenA blog post by Education Intern Arielle Kaden. To read more posts from interns click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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