Fievel and the Tooth Fairy visit the JMM

Posted on August 20th, 2015 by

This past Sunday, JMM Features continued, the second in a series of free movie screenings accompanying this summer’s exhibit Cinema Judaica. The classic animation An American Tail  drew a great crowd. Everyone seemed to enjoy the movie and there was plenty of popcorn to go around! It was especially wonderful to see lots of new faces.

The event included fun activities for the whole family. Children and parents learned how to draw their favorite Jewish cartoon characters. Other activities included creating Fievel out of pipe cleaners and illustrating modern cartoon version of An American Tail, considering the challenges faced by immigrants today.

The crowds gathering before the movie starts

The crowds gathering before the movie starts.

Learning how to draw Fievel

Learning how to draw Fievel.

My favorite activity -  making Fievel with pipe cleaners.

My favorite activity – making Fievel with pipe cleaners.

We also had a visit from an unexpected guest, the Tooth Fairy! Adam and his family, visiting from Ohio, joined us for the movie. However, while watching Fievel on his adventures, Adam’s wiggly tooth came out. We have welcomed guests from around the globe but this may be a first.

Adam

Adam

If you haven’t had a chance to join us yet for JMM Features you have one last chance this week. On Sunday, August 23rd at 8:00 p.m. we will be holding a free screening Gentleman’s Agreement in the lot in front of the JMM. Again this is a BYOC (bring your own chair) event but we will supply the popcorn. If you feel like making an evening of it, bring a picnic, or even grab something from one of the wonderful local restaurants.

I hope to see you on Sunday!

 

 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Ancient Egypt at the JMM

Posted on May 18th, 2015 by

I became involved in the development for The A-Mazing Mendes Cohen as I have a background in Egyptology, it isn’t something I ever expected to use when I started working at the JMM but recently it has been put to good use. In addition to working on the exhibit I have been able to plan a few programs that also draw on this knowledge.

Last month we held an Ancient Egypt family day here at the Museum. We wanted to make sure it wasn’t just the usual discussion of mummification but something that would teach some of the skills needed by an early Egyptologist like Mendes. We planned a series of interconnected activities that showed some of the process an archaeologist follows.

Excavation

Excavation

Understanding how to excavate was our first aim, everyone received their own archaeological dig to excavate. We started by carefully dividing the site into sections, these would be essential for recording our finds accurately . As we dug we also spoke about the importance of stratigraphy and how it helps to date a site and the objects we find.

Due to some careful planning everyone found the remains of two ceramic vessels which were carefully recorded and collected for the next stage.

ancient 2

Finds Analysis

This was an important part of the day that really taught some practical skills. We examined the pieces we found, discussing rim sherds especially. We looked at how they can be used to create a better impression of how a vessel may have originally looked, especially the size of the vessel. We also discussed why ceramics are such a common find on archaeological sites and what they can reveal.

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

Once we gathered as much information as possible regarding our sherds we stared the process of reconstruction, this took a lot of patience and a little creative thinking, but eventually we were able to reconstruct our precious artefacts!

Hieroglyphs

Hieroglyphs

The one thing that no Ancient Egypt day would be complete without is of course hieroglyphs. All of the materials that were excavated came ready inscribed with their ‘original’ contents, including bread, beer, cobras and fish. Once the translation was done we took the opportunity to do some writing in hieroglyphs ourselves.

Grave Goods

Finally we explored some of the types of object an archaeologist might discover. Most of the material that survives from Ancient Egypt, including all of the antiquities on display in The A-Mazing Mendes Cohen, were originally intended for a funerary context. So we decided to make a few grave goods of our own including this fantastic death mask and some shabtis.

If you missed out on Egypt Day don’t worry! We have another great family day planned for June 14th, the closing day of The A-Mazing Mendes Cohen and Flag Day.

Trillion BremenA blog post by Programs Manager Trillion Attwood. To read more posts from Trillion click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Program Wrap Up: Dr. Betsy Bryan on Egyptian Funerary Beliefs

Posted on April 2nd, 2015 by

This Sunday we welcomed Dr. Betsy Bryan of Johns Hopkins University to the JMM to offer a little more insight into Mendes Cohen’s collection of antiquities. Dr. Bryan’s fascinating presentation  discussed both the collection as a whole and the way in which it represents ancient Egyptian funerary beliefs.

The Program

The Program

The collection, originally consisting of nearly 700 objects, formed the basis of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, and was donated shortly after Mendes’ death by his nephew also named Mendes Cohen. Most of the pieces were acquired during his time in modern Luxor during his three month voyage down the Nile.

Dr. Bryan explained that the ancient Egyptians believed the afterlife to be similar to life, as such requiring many of the same possessions. These requirements ranged from the body, hence the need for mummification, to smaller items such as cosmetic containers, jewelry and food. Some items such as jewelry provided a dual function having protective powers, often associated with the preservation of the body.

Selections from Mendes' archaeological collection.

Selections from Mendes’ archaeological collection.

The talk predominantly  focused upon standards within wealthier members of the community especially Tutankhamun. However there was a particularly interesting discussion regarding ordinary members of society and the simpler grave goods that can be found in their burials based upon Dr. Bryans current work in Egypt.

Please enjoy this recording of Dr. Brayns presentation and share with friends and family!

Trillion BremenA blog post by Programs Manager Trillion Attwood. To read more posts from Trillion click HERE.

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




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