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Expressing Identity

Posted on June 30th, 2020 by

While the museum is closed the JMM team is coming together to bring some of our favorite activities from our recent family programs direct to your homes. Each collection of materials will be inspired by either one of our exhibits, Jewish History, or a Jewish holiday.

All of the activities we share are designed for families to complete together and use supplies you are likely to already have in your home. The activities we offer include crafts, games, scavenger hunts, online story times, and more. You can check out previous activity packs here!

~The JMM Programs Team


This week, inspired by Pride month, we are thinking about identities. Image via.

For all of us, our identity can include many elements, the things we choose to express and the things that society sees within us. Our identity can include our ethnic heritage, nationality, and religion which we often share with our family. Our identity can also include skills, interests, passions and political beliefs. It takes all of these elements to create each of our unique identities. With the activities in this packet, think about your own identity and what makes you who you are.

Pride month celebrates the members of our community who identify as LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, intersex, and asexual), an umbrella term used by some to describe their sexual orientation and gender identities. Individuals who identify as part of this group often face significant challenges across the world, including within our Baltimore community. It is for this reason that coming together every June to mark Pride month is so important, whether or not we personally identify as part of this group.

Don’t forget to share photos of you enjoying our crafts and activities on our FacebookTwitterInstagram, or Tumblr pages and use #MuseumFromHome.


Download the full Expressing Identity activity packet as a single pdf here.


Wear It With Pride

One great way to express your identity is through your clothing. This activity is inspired by our Fashion Statement exhibit and will help you think about the power of what we choose to wear.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

A printed copy blank t-shirt

A printed copy of our t-shirt icons

Markers

Download Instructions for Wear It With Pride


Eating Your Heritage

For many, food is a great way to celebrate their heritage. Perhaps you and your family enjoy turkey for thanksgiving or matzah for Passover. Inspired by our Chosen Food exhibit, in this activity, create a plate of food that represents your heritage.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

A printed copy of our sample place setting, paper or a paper plate.

Markers

Download Instructions for Eating Your Heritage


Pride Buttons

Rally button, JMM 1987.208.3; Chizuk Amuno Tikun Olam button, JMM 2003.60.1; Barack Obama campaign button, JMM 2008.78.1; March on Washington button, JMM 1992.103.1.

Buttons and pins are a great way to show your support of different causes. They can be almost any size, shape, or color. In this activity, you can design and create a button to support the LGBTQ community. Use these same instructions to create buttons that support other causes that are important to you.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

Recycled cardboard

Scissors

Craft Supplies

Safety Pin

Tape

Download Instructions for Pride Buttons


Pride Flag

Flags have historically been a great way to show your support, continue your support of the LGBTQ community by creating a Pride flag.

Supplies needed:

 Paper

Markers

Chopstick, skewer, or paint stirrer

Tape

Download Instructions for Pride Flag


Keep‌ ‌Discovering‌ ‌

‌ ‌If you enjoyed designing a t-shirt to express your identity, why not experiment with tie dye. Express your individuality and creativity by tie-dying t-shirts.

Art is a great way to express your identity and individuality. Try making a collage that expresses your identity.

Think about aspects of your identity you want to represent- your religion, heritage, personality, likes, dislikes, hobbies, groups and communities you belong to, and values. Then, draw your own silhouette or use a template. Fill it with magazine pictures, words, and drawings that express your personal identity.

Listen to readings of two books about expressing your identity. In Chik Chak Shabbat, hear about how food can express our personal and familial identities:

In Be Who You Are celebrate the many ways we can express ourselves and our uniqueness:

Ready for more? Explore the resources published by Keshet, an organization dedicated to working towards LGBTQ equality in Jewish life!


 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Exploring Jewish Art

Posted on May 28th, 2020 by

While the museum is closed the JMM team is coming together to bring some of our favorite activities from our recent family programs direct to your homes. Each collection of materials will be inspired by either one of our exhibits, Jewish History, or a Jewish holiday.

All of the activities we share are designed for families to complete together and use supplies you are likely to already have in your home. The activities we offer include crafts, games, scavenger hunts, online story times, and more. You can check out previous activity packs here!

~The JMM Programs Team


Did you know that May is Jewish American Heritage month?

This month we’re using our weekly family activity packets to highlight different aspects of Jewish American history, inspired by our collections. This week’s activities focus on art, looking at just a few examples from what makes up the vast category of Jewish art.

What is Jewish art anyway? One kind of Jewish art is ceremonial objects, also known as Judaica. These are objects used in rituals during Shabbat and holidays, like Torah covers, yads, tallit, candlesticks, etc. and are often beautiful and intricately designed. Another kind of Jewish art is Jewish folk art, which includes thinks like papercutting, calligraphy, and wood carving.

Silver spice box, JMM 1996.141.15. Gold-plated Torah crown used at Beth Jacob Congregation, JMM 2010.7.1. Glass-based wedding cup, JMM 1996.141.25. Cast metal dreidel, JMM 1996.141.46.

Art can also be called Jewish if it was created by Jewish individuals. Jewish artists have worked in a variety of different styles across history. For some artists, like Marc Chagall, Judaism was central to their work, while for others, such as the Impressionist Camille Pissaro, the influence of their Judaism on their work is less apparent.

Sketch by Helen Ries for Levindale Auxiliary Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital contribution card, JMM 19993.138.11. Rosalyn Shechter with her sculpture “Lady Eve,” 1962, JMM 1974.21.17. Sketch of Marian Anderson by Reuben Kramer,” 1954, JMM 1991.115.4. “My Mother’s Bread,” still life painting by Herman Maril, 1955, JMM 1989.125.1.

Learn about these different types of Jewish art through the activities below. From exploring the work of Maryland Jewish artists to creating your own ritual and folk art, we hope you enjoy this introduction to Jewish art.

Think about what you can learn by looking at and making art. The art objects in the Museum’s collections are not just beautiful works, they also tell us important historical information. Things like what materials were available to artists of the time, what places used to look like, and even what people valued at the time.

Art tells stories. What kinds of stories do you want your art to tell?

Don’t forget to share photos of you enjoying our crafts and activities on our FacebookTwitterInstagram, or Tumblr pages and use #MuseumFromHome.


Download the full Exploring Jewish Art activity packet as a single pdf here.


Everyday Observations

Drawing of a woman and child shopping in Baltimore, JMM 2005.66.84. Untitled painting of Lombard Street, JMM 2010.83.4. Sketchof the bar at Whitbread Tavern, September 17, 1979, JMM 2005.66.74. All works by Jacob Glushakow.

Jacob Glushakow was a Jewish Baltimore artist who painted scenes of everyday life, showing how our city and its people have changed over the years.

Now is a great time to use art to document your own life and how it has changed and is still changing. We’d love to add your work to our collections, just like Glushakow’s paintings! You can donate the work you create to JMM as part of our History is Now: JMM Collects Stories of the Pandemic Initiative.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

Paper

Pencil, pen, markers, or paint

Download Instructions for Everyday Observations

Bonus: Grab a copy of our JMM Jacob Glushakow Coloring Book and a special color-your-own Glushakow valentine!

Learn more about Jacob Glushakow’s life and legacy in this video with his nephew, Robert:


Abstract Creations

“Decalogue,” pair of acrylic paintings on canvas, 1977, JMM 1987.50.1a. “Moses at the Burning Bush,” 1951, JMM 2011.18.1. “Aaron,” cut paper relief, 1977. JMM 1987.13.2.

Amalie Rothschild was another Jewish Baltimore artist with a very different style from Glushakow. She created abstract paintings and sculptures, works of art that don’t look realistic or lifelike.

In this activity, create your own work of abstract art using shapes, forms, and colors.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

Paper

Pencil, pen, markers, or colored pencils

Download Instructions for Abstract Creations

Bonus: Learn more about Amalie Rothschild in this blog post from former JMM intern Codi Lamb.


Make a Mezuzah

Bezalel-style silver mezuzah, JMM 1996.141.54. Plastic mezuzah, Temple Oheb Shalom Collection, JMM 2004.97.65. Metal mezuzah cover, c. 1950s, JMM 1997.53.16. Bezalel mezuzah from Jerusalem, Temple Oheb Shalom Collection, JMM 2004.97.67.

A mezuzah is one of the key ritual art objects for the home.

In this activity, create your own mezuzah case – we suggest hanging it at a kid-friendly height on a doorpost. This is a perfect activity for using recycled materials from around your home.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

Empty matchbox or other small recyclable container with an opening

Popsicle stick

Glue

Craft supplies

Masking tape

Paper

Download Instructions for Make a Mezuzah

If you’re looking for more ways to practice hiddur mitzvah (the beautification of ritual objects), check out this website which has a  collection of Jewish crafts that are great for holidays, Shabbat, and everyday life!


Snowflake Papercuts

Tamar Fishman, papercut artist, at work, Baltimore Jewish Times Collection, JMM 2012.54.24.2. Snowflake-style papercut by Fishman. Ketubah papercut by Fishman. Baltimore Jewish Times Collection, 2012.54.24.4,5. Photos by Craig Terkowitz.

‌Papercutting is one of the most popular forms of Jewish folk art. While you can make papercuts anytime of the year, now is a particularly great time since some people decorate their homes with papercuts before the holiday of Shavout.

Supplies needed:

Paper

Scissors

Download Instructions for Snowflake Papercuts

Bonus: Learn more about papercut artist Tamar Fishman, who also designed the official 2018 US Hanukkah postage stamp!

Discover more about the history of Jewish papercutting and see some examples of beautiful artwork in this video:


Keep‌ ‌Discovering‌ ‌

Explore one of the largest collections of Jewish art online with the Center for Jewish Art. View works of art that are hundreds (and even thousands) of years old as well as more modern pieces.

Learn more about Jewish women artists around the world at the Jewish Women’s Archive.

Wikipedia has a long list of Jewish American artists to explore.


 

Posted in jewish museum of maryland




Coming to America

Posted on May 20th, 2020 by

While the museum is closed the JMM team is coming together to bring some of our favorite activities from our recent family programs direct to your homes. Each collection of materials will be inspired by either one of our exhibits, Jewish History, or a Jewish holiday.

All of the activities we share will be designed for families to complete together and only require supplies you are likely to already have in your home. The activities we offer will be varied from crafts, activities, games, scavenger hunts, and online story times. You can check out previous activity packs here!

~The JMM Programs Team


Did you know that May is Jewish American Heritage month?

This month we’re using our weekly family activity packets to highlight different aspects of Jewish American history, inspired by our collections. This week’s activity packets focus on immigration. These activities celebrate all those brave individuals who left their homes and families to try to make a better life for themselves here in America.

Soviet immigrants aided by HIAS, reuniting with family in the US, c. 1970s. JMM 1997.134.10.

The U.S. is a country made almost entirely of immigrants and their descendants, including the Jewish community. The earliest Jewish individuals came here during the colonial era, before America was even its own country!

The majority of Jewish immigrants to America came between 1840 and 1920 from countries in central and eastern Europe like Germany, Poland and Russia. Deciding to immigrate was a huge undertaking, especially without the modern conveniences we have today like air travel, cell phones, and the internet. People had to plan for a long and challenging journey and the reality that they likely wouldn’t return to their original homes or see the families they left behind again.

Naturalization ceremony held at JMM, June 20, 2019.

Baltimore plays an especially important part in the story of our country’s immigrants. Locust Point was one of the largest immigration ports in the country, second only to Ellis Island in New York. New immigrants could either begin to make a home in Baltimore or easily travel across the U.S. via the B&O railroad.

The activities in this package explore some of the challenges faced by immigrants, both historically and today.

Don’t forget to share photos of you enjoying our crafts and activities on our FacebookTwitterInstagram, or Tumblr pages and use #MuseumFromHome.


Download the full Coming to America activity packet as a single pdf here.


Packing Up

‌Greeting new immigrants at the airport, c. 1970s. HIAS collection, JMM 1997.134.682; Hecht family steamer trunk. JMM 2012.115.1; Russian passport for Moses Pines, 1911. JMM 1989.177.1a.

Deciding what to take to a new country is a tricky decision. You need to find a careful balance of both everyday items plus things that will help you earn money, create a new home and keep you connected to your home and family. Plus you are sometimes limited by the size and weight of items you can bring with you!

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

Suitcase template

Markers

Scotch Tape

Scissors

Immigration – Packing Up


Get Stitching

Giving a knitting lesson, 1935. JMM 1991.185.1; Baltimore tailor shop, c. 1908. JMM 1991.24.3a; Students from Holabird Academy learn about Baltimore’s garment industry in “Voices of Lombard Street” at JMM.

Did you know that the garment industry was once the largest industry in Baltimore? The textile industry is one that proved especially welcoming to new Jewish immigrants, requiring limited English and the skills many immigrants brought with them from Europe.

In this simple sewing craft you can develop your own sewing skills while also creating an “ear defender,” a particularly useful item in our current time.

Supplies‌ ‌needed:‌ ‌

Strong ribbon, 1 inch wide

Large buttons

Needle and thread

Scissors

Ruler

Lighter or candle

Download Instructions for Get Stitching


The New New Colossus

Handwritten manuscript of Emma Lazarus’ “The New Colossus,” 1883. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Unveiling of the Statue of Liberty by Edward Moran, 1886. Courtesy of the Museum of the City of New York. Engraving of Emma Lazarus, 1889 by W. Kurtz. Via.

The Statue of Liberty welcomed so many immigrants to our country, but she is so much more than a statue! Learn a little more about the poem The New Colossus and create your own poem to welcome new immigrants to America.

Learn more about Emma Lazarus, author of The New Colossus, The Emma Lasazrus Project at  from the American Jewish Historical Society!

Supplies needed:

Paper

Pencil

Download Instructions for The New New Colossus


Discovering Your Heritage  

Harvey Meyerhoff with baby Joseph Meyerhoff II, 1960. JMM 2004.80.84; Levy Family Tree. JMM 1991.20.30; A.D. Glushakow recording for Baltimore Jewish Radio Voice. JMM 1996.56.23.

The reason we know so much about immigrants to our city and our country, is through people sharing and documenting their family stories. This activity is a great way to connect all generations of your family and help you better learn and understand your own heritage.

Supplies needed:

Paper

Pencil

Download Instructions for Discovering Your Heritage


Keep‌ ‌Discovering‌ ‌

Explore the online portion of the JMM original exhibit Scrap Yard: Innovators of Recycling. The scrap industry attracted many new immigrants, requiring a low level of financial investment as well as requiring little English to start a new scrap business.

Learn more about other jobs that were more welcoming to new immigrants to America in this archival exploration from the JMM education team!

Listen to the story Mendel’s Accordion and learn about Mendel’s journey to the United States, including the important role music plays in connecting old traditions to his new life.  

The Baltimore Immigration Museum is a great resource to learn about the different groups who immigrated to Baltimore in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Interested in helping new immigrants? The Baltimore-based Esperanza Center has many tips on how to help, including getting involved in advocacy work.


 

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