Performance Counts: July 2014

Posted on July 11th, 2014 by

We’re Gonna Be A Star!

Lights, camera, action!

Lights, camera, action!

Some of you may remember back in December when we introduced our new collateral material (Performance Counts: December 2013), the beautiful folder and brochure designed by Gallagher & Associates. What you may not remember is that this project, generously made possible by the William G. Baker, Jr. Memorial Fund, has a second part! We at the Museum have been hard at work developing a video calling card – that is, we’re putting together a short film (about 6 minutes long) that will serve as an introduction to the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

Why a video? As you know, the Museum has been expanding its development efforts, particularly in the corporate sphere. We feel that a video is the perfect way to capture the attention and hearts of those we hope will support the Museum and its mission. DVDs containing the video can be included with our brochures and folders whenever we put out a grant proposal. Digital copies of the video will be accessible on our website for those seeking to find out more about the Museum. Shorter clips can be shared with media outlets and on our own social media. This video will serve a variety of purposes and give us another tool to engage others with the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

Living History actress Karen Lyons

Living History actress Karen Lyons

Something you might not know: making a video is hard work! We’ve been working with the fantastic team from Blue Land Media and an extraordinary group of volunteers to gather and film the content we need. For our short, 6 minute video we started with over 12 hours of interview footage! This doesn’t include all the “b-roll” that the team shot. (B-roll is all the shots of buildings, landscapes, close ups of objects and exhibits, etc. Basically, all the material that isn’t a shot of someone talking.) We needed to complete all of our filming over two days. This meant a lot of coordination of schedules (we filmed 13 separate interviews, a school visit and multiple synagogue tours), a lot of equipment moving all around the Museum (we filmed in 4 different locations) and a lot of enthusiasm from everyone involved.

And we can’t thank our volunteer interviewees enough. We gathered board members, staff, teachers, museum volunteers and members of our community to tell the story of JMM. Let me tell you: they were wonderful! We couldn’t have asked for a better group of people – their love for the Museum and our neighborhood came shining through.

Past President Barbara Katz

Past President Barbara Katz

Now we’re in the editing phase – that means watching all the footage, identifying the best pieces and trying to reduce that 12+ hours of video by over 120%! We’re very excited by what we’re seeing and we can’t wait to share the finished product with you.

Rachel KThis month’s Performance Counts was written by Development and Marketing Manager Rachel Kassman. To read past editions of Performance Counts, click HERE.

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An Installation Process

Posted on March 2nd, 2011 by

One of the benefits of working at a small museum is that we each have the opportunity to wear many hats.  It’s how I became the graphic designer.  And the web master.  And part of the social media team.  Our days are full of little extra things that keep the job interesting.

One of those things is helping to move travelling exhibits.  The wonderful Community Outreach Coordinator Rachael Binning is responsible for finding homes across the state (and, possibly, the country) for the exhibitions curated and created by the JMM.  This is quite a task, it involves a lot of research, emails, and phone calls.  I can say that because our desks are next to each other.

This past week we installed Drawing on Tradition: The Book of Esther, an exhibit of work by artist JT Waldman, curated by the Jewish Museum of Maryland.  On Tuesday Rachael (from hereon known as Toodles to differentiate her from Rachel Kassman) drove to DC in a giant van with the work.  We unloaded everything at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue and then treated ourselves to Chinese food and frozen yogurt.

On Thursday night, Jennifer Vess (Archivist), Rachel Kassman (Photo Archivist), Toodles and I stayed after work to help with the 18 Stones Book Signing & Reception at the Museum.  It was here that we learned that (unsurprisingly, I guess) challah with sweet butter and chocolate sprinkles is delicious.

After the program we left for DC, with a stop at Target on the way (to buy an airmattress.  And a few blouses).  We arrived in DC at Toodles’ house, quickly snuggled her dog Wednesday, and then headed to Ted’s Bulletin for dinner.  Now, there are two points that need clarification.  1) We decided to all stay at Toodles’ house Thursday night so that we could get up and begin installing first thing Friday.  2) We chose Ted’s because they have adult milkshakes.

Mmmmm… adult milkshakes, burgers, and more!  This was a good dinner out.  After dinner we went back to the house, took Wednesday on a long walk, admired the architecture of Capitol Hill, and then knitted and watched movies.

Early the next morning we got moving, got breakfast, and arrived at Sixth & I.  Here is where I stop to say the most sincere thank you I can muster to Cecilio, the hanging genius/madman that helped us hang.  He was a precise hanging machine and we’d still be there, crying in the corner, exhibition unfinished, if not for him.  We all divided up tasks– hanging, condition reporting, putting up the giant decal that took 10 years off my life.  And amazingly, it went up!

Throughout the process, we took a lot of photos with my DSLR and the end product was (what we think is) an awesome stop-motion video.

 

Drawing on Tradition: The Book of Esther from Jewish Museum of Maryland on Vimeo.

Afterwards we rewarded ourselves with much deserved frozen yogurt.  Be sure to stop by Sixth & I to see the exhibit through April 29!

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