A Full Museum: The Grand Opening of Cinema Judaica

Posted on July 6th, 2015 by

On Thursday, July 2nd the Jewish Museum of Maryland opened the doors of its new traveling exhibit: Cinema Judaica! 130 members and visitors came to see the new exhibit, enjoying signature 1950s cocktails, sparkling wine, and kosher refreshments before the presentation. It was a fun event for all and gave museum members an opportunity to unwind at the museum. The event helped me learn about what is involved in preparing for a big event.

Members of the museum and special guests enjoy cocktails and kosher refreshments.

Members of the museum and special guests enjoy cocktails and kosher refreshments.

Education and Programming Intern Eden serves drinks.

Education and Programming Intern Eden serves drinks.

Visitors have a conversation about the film posters in the exhibit.

Visitors have a conversation about the film posters in the exhibit.

After the special cocktail hour, Ken Sutak, author of the book Cinema Judaica, gave a fascinating lecture titled How Harry Warner, Ernst Toller, and Alvin York Helped Win ‘The Great Debate’ for American Interventionists. I enjoyed learning about how the movie posters influenced public opinion and were used to help the US decide to intervene in World War II. The leaders Harry Warner, Ernest Toller, and Alvin York went against popular opinion in Hollywood and developed films like A Nazi Spy which played a role in getting America to intervene in WWII. There was also a book signing after the presentation.

Ken Sutak, author and curator of Cinema Judaica talks about  “The Great Debate.”

Ken Sutak, author and curator of Cinema Judaica talks about “The Great Debate.” Photo by Will Kirk.

 Collections Intern Kaleigh Ratliff, and Education and Programming Intern Falicia Eddy encourage visitors to vote for, and take pictures by their favorite poster.

Collections Intern Kaleigh Ratliff, and Education and Programming Intern Falicia Eddy encourage visitors to vote for, and take pictures by their favorite poster.

Visitors will have plenty more opportunities to see the exhibit – though don’t wait too long as Cinema Judaica closes on September 6, 2015! The museum has planned several other great events around the exhibit including free outdoor film screenings: The Great Dictator on August 9th, and Gentleman’s Agreement on August 23rd.

Can’t wait until August? On Sunday, July 12th come to our Flickering Treasures talk at 1pm with photographer Amy Davis to learn about the history of Baltimore’s own movie theaters!

Falicia EddyA blog post by Education and Programs Intern Falicia Eddy. To read  more posts from interns click HERE.

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Cinema Judaica: Behind the Scenes

Posted on July 2nd, 2015 by

To celebrate the opening of our latest exhibit Cinema Judaica, I thought it would be fun to give you a quick behind the scenes look at what it’s like to prepare an exhibit for the public. Although I wasn’t involved much in the actual installation of this exhibit, I was able to lend a hand as opening day drew nearer and finishing touches were made.

 Labels are laid beneath their posters in preparation for putting them on the walls.


Labels are laid beneath their posters in preparation for putting them on the walls.

There was lot to be done the day before the gallery doors opened to the public. Labels needed to be printed and placed under each movie poster in the exhibit. The labels couldn’t be placed on the wall right away- they had to be matched up to their corresponding posters.

 Labels are laid beneath their posters in preparation for putting them on the walls.


Labels are laid beneath their posters in preparation for putting them on the walls.

Once the labels were matched up to their posters, it was time to stick them to the wall. Each label was to be carefully placed exactly one inch from the bottom of its corresponding poster and lined up with the right edge. Once it was determined exactly where the label would go, carefully the double sided sticky tape on the back was peeled and the label was gently and precisely placed on the wall.

 Rachel carefully measures one inch from the bottom of the poster.


Rachel carefully measures one inch from the bottom of the poster.

 Once she measured, she was finally able to place the label on the wall with double sided tape.


Once she measured, she was finally able to place the label on the wall with double sided tape.

The Queen of Sheba’s finished label mounted on the wall.

The Queen of Sheba’s finished label mounted on the wall.

Although a lot of the instructions when it came to labeling was fairly straightforward, some things were left to stylistic choices.

 Joanna decides where she would like to place this label, which belongs to all three of these posters. Should it go to the right, the left, or the center?

Joanna decides where she would like to place this label, which belongs to all three of these posters. Should it go to the right, the left, or the center?

Finally, all that was left was to put up the panels in the front of the exhibit.

Joanna and Rachel team up to put up the remaining panels at the front of the exhibit.

Joanna and Rachel team up to put up the remaining panels at the front of the exhibit.

This behind the scenes look highlights the fact that there is a lot that goes into creating and setting up an exhibit. It’s easy to walk into an exhibit and forget that in order for it to be available to you, so many people took their time to put it together and make it something worth appreciating.

CarmenA blog post by Marketing Intern Carmen Venable. To read more posts by interns click HERE.

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Voices from My Childhood

Posted on July 1st, 2015 by

SuperKids, a summer camp program, is organized by a nonprofit called Parks and People Foundation. The organization is “dedicated to supporting a wide range of recreational and educational opportunities; creating and sustaining beautiful and lively parks; and promoting a healthy natural environment for Baltimore.” So it’s only fitting that SuperKids takes a group of young, inquisitive learners around different places in Baltimore, expanding their environmental sights and experiences as well as their vocabulary list. The Jewish Museum of Maryland has been privileged to be one of these sites for the last few years during their Jonestown neighborhood tour.

On a wet and muggy Tuesday morning, a yellow school bus reminiscent of my own elementary school days brought 25 eager students to the museum’s red brick road. They were extremely well behaved for kids who would essentially be on a different field trip every day for the summer. It was me who couldn’t contain the excitement of seeing my fellow peers (I may look like a 20-something year old, but I’m a child at heart). Since the group was too large to take all at once, Lois, one of our super volunteers, took half of the kids on a tour of the Lloyd Street Synagogue while Falicia and I took the other half to do two activities- a scavenger hunt in the Voices of Lombard Street exhibit and an archaeology puzzle activity.

I’ve never been one to simply observe, so here I am “making” a traditional Sabbath dinner with some of the kids while reading them the newspaper.

I’ve never been one to simply observe, so here I am “making” a traditional Sabbath dinner with some of the kids while reading them the newspaper.

While Falicia helped with the archaeology “dig,” I assisted with the Voices of Lombard Street portion where the talk of immigration brought back my own memories of my parent’s journey to this country from South Korea for the “American Dream.” Unlike the Jewish immigrants who came to Baltimore on a ship, my parents took a plane, and they weren’t fleeing religious persecution. But I remember rolling my eyes at my parents every time they lectured me on how hard they worked to build a nice home for the family, and how they too worked menial yet necessary jobs beyond their intelligence and skills. I remember threatening my parents to call child services for making me work at their dry cleaners on my free Saturday, only to be bribed by McDonald’s. Like Paul Wartzman whose mom used to make gefilte fish every Friday, my grandmother used to make dduk-mandu-guk (rice cake and dumpling soup) every Sunday. And how my mom used to drive out of her way to go to a Korean market not just for authentic Korean food from the Motherland, but for human interaction with people who also spoke her native language.

This is me, age eight, standing in front of my new house being built. Although we only lived here for a year, this was a milestone for my family because it was the first home that truly belonged to us. No more living in relative’s homes and no more renting.

This is me, age eight, standing in front of my new house being built. Although we only lived here for a year, this was a milestone for my family because it was the first home that truly belonged to us. No more living in relative’s homes and no more renting.

And for me to now teach elementary school kids about that same topic brings this whole experience to a full circle. To set the record straight, I’m a natural born U.S. citizen and I’ve learned to not take that for granted.

I’m not Jewish. My family is Christian, and in fact, I’m part of a very loving and active church community. I came to work at this museum, excited to learn about another religion and perhaps learn more about my own. I didn’t expect to have much in common with those who lived on Lombard Street, but as I talked about each part of the exhibit to the students, I saw my own childhood in the quotes hanging on the walls.

It’s funny how June was Immigrant Heritage Month and on the very last day, it took a group of kids to make me realize how important that month should have been to me. If SuperKids were real superheroes, their superpower would be sparking a child-like spirit, curiosity, and wonder in adults. I certainly feel rescued. I may not have a degree in teaching, but I’m still so honored to be a small part of that process, and I look forward to a summer filled with SuperKids!

IMG_0993A blog post by Education Intern Eden Cho. To read more posts by interns click HERE.

 

 

 

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